Bloomberg Businessweek

Another Dispute Over The Sept. 11 Lawsuit Bill

Legal experts say it’s already too weak to help plaintiffs much | “All the law does is clarify existing U.S. law, nothing more”
A protest outside the White House in support of allowing Sept. 11 families to sue Saudi Arabia, Sept. 20, 2016

For 14 years families of Sept. 11 victims have tried unsuccessfully to use the courts to pin responsibility for the terrorist attacks on Saudi Arabia. Legal obstacles have blocked those efforts, but on Sept. 28, Congress passed legislation—overriding a veto by President Obama—advertised as clearing the families’ path. “We rejoice in this triumph and look forward to our day in court,” declared Terry Strada, whose husband, Tom, died at the World Trade Center and who heads 9/11 Families & Survivors United for Justice Against Terrorism.

A close inspection of the

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek12 min read
Mexico’s Drug War: Live in Concert!
AN AMERICAN RECORD LABEL THAT HAS MADE MILLIONS CHRONICLING THE DRUG TRADE TRIES TO GO MAINSTREAM.
Bloomberg Businessweek5 min readPolitics
Working for Medicaid
Kentucky is about to become the first state to impose a work rule for Medicaid. Ben Abell and Bree Pearsall worry about what it will mean for their business. The married couple raise lamb and grow 40 crops on a farm outside Louisville that Abell says
Bloomberg Businessweek3 min readTech
An App That Comes With A Kitchen
Food delivery apps don’t make money. That’s one of the big lessons venture capitalists have taken away from the past few years, as the startup graveyard has filled with names such as Sprig, Jinn, and Take Eat Easy. Despite the $100 billion market, ma