Newsweek

Experts Suspect New Dead Sea Scroll Fragments Are Fake

One fragment references the two strongest condemnations of homosexuality in the Bible—such a coincidence could be a flag of fakery.
An employee of the Israel Antiquities Authority sews fragments of the Dead Sea scrolls in a preservation laboratory at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem on July 20, 2015.
10_28_Scrolls_01 Source: Eddie Gerald/Getty

While most Americans are riveted by a tumultuous presidential campaign, archaeologists and experts in ancient writing have been focused on some newly discovered bits of ancient history: 70 alleged fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls. The fragments reference some of the verses found in the Old Testament, and antiquities dealers and owners claim they were created by a desert-dwelling, ascetic Jewish sect called the Essenes in

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