Nautilus

Conservationists Are Learning How To Use a Pretty Face

This August, German photographer Kerstin Langenberger posted a photo to Facebook of a frail polar bear, evidently starved, adrift among the disappearing ice. In the photo’s caption, she blamed global warming for the bear’s malnutrition and for the death of many others she’d seen. Articles featuring Langenberger’s commentary and photo followed soon after, with headlines like: “Polar Bear’s Shocking Appearance May Be Tied To Climate Change” and “Emaciated Polar Bear ‘Doomed to Death’ Fuels Global Warming Debate.”

An emaciated polar bear, scavenging in the Arctic.Kerstin Langenberger

This story is real enough. If something doesn’t change soon, two-thirds of polar

Sie lesen eine Vorschau. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen.

Mehr von Nautilus

Nautilus18 min gelesenScience & Mathematics
The Trouble with Brain Scans: An aspiring cognitive scientist faces the sketchy truth about fMRI.
One autumn afternoon in the bowels of UC Berkeley’s Li Ka Shing Center, I was looking at my brain. I had just spent 10 minutes inside the 3 Tesla MRI scanner, the technical name for a very expensive, very high maintenance, very magnetic brain camera.
Nautilus6 min gelesen
How Surprising Connections Can Save the Ocean: Marine biologist Heather Koldewey on conservation, seahorses, and cross-discipline work.
Many marine biologists identify a gateway drug into their obsession, and for Heather Koldewey, it was the seahorse. Who can blame her? Seahorses seem to have evolved not entirely in the ocean, but also by way of a whimsical storybook, in which animal
Nautilus8 min gelesenIntelligence (AI) & Semantics
I Am Not a Machine. Yes You Are.: Debating the impact of machine-created art.
I’m trying to explain to Arthur I. Miller why artworks generated by computers don’t quite do it for me. There’s no human being behind them. The works aren’t a portal into another person’s mind, where you can wander in a warren of intention, emotion,