Nautilus

The Case for More Intellectual Humility

I can remember, almost a decade ago, when I was convinced out of my “Young-Earth” Creationism. It was almost a process of de-radicalization. During high school I was a generic Christian, but then some friends suggested I watch a video of a pastor online and, well, you can guess the rest. The message encouraged spreading skepticism of evolutionary biology, geology, and cosmology—the fields which most directly contradicted the Christian fundamentalist worldview. It was this evangelism, though, that ultimately helped undermine that belief. It later led me, in my freshman year of college at U.C. Santa Barbara, to enroll in an intro to geology course—I thought I’d see through the arguments in

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