The Atlantic

Catastrophe and the Comedy of the Self-Aware Marriage

Season 3 of Amazon’s show is funnier than ever as it portrays a couple negotiating serious issues with a smirk.
Source: Ed Miller / Amazon Prime Video

Toward the end of the first episode of Catastrophe’s third season, Sharon sits down on a couch next to her husband Rob after confessing that she’s betrayed his trust. She asks a question: “What now?”

Rob re-etches his magnificent block of a face, and what had been stoic rage at his wife’s betrayal becomes resignation. “I don’t know,” he says. “I guess over time I’ll have to learn to forgive you.”

“Right,” Sharon says, her brows knotting and her lip twitching, a picture of worry and shame. “Over how much time?”

“I don’t know. I guess it’ll take two or three months. A

Sie lesen eine Vorschau. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen.

Mehr von The Atlantic

The Atlantic4 min gelesen
Is Loki Darker Than It Seems?
A Brutalist aesthetic. Allusions to autocracy. The early episodes of Marvel’s new series may seem breezy, but its dystopian design hints at more sinister twists ahead.
The Atlantic4 min gelesen
The Atlantic Daily: This Summer Could Be the 2000s Again
Americans are excited to dance again. This summer’s pop charts may soak up some of that energy.
The Atlantic8 min gelesenPolitical Ideologies
Democracy Is Already Dying in the States
While Senator Joe Manchin is demanding that both parties agree on any further federal voting-rights legislation, a new study quantifies how completely Republicans have excluded Democrats from the passage of the restrictive voting laws proliferating i