New York Magazine

1. TO UNDERSTAND THIS NEW RIGHT, IT HELPS TO SEE IT NOT AS A FRINGE MOVEMENT, BUT A POWERFUL COUNTERCULTURE.

WHEN DID THE RIGHT WING get so bizarre? Consider: For a brief and confusing moment earlier this year, milk somehow became a charged symbol of both white supremacy and support for Donald Trump. The details are postmodern, absurdist, and ominous—not unlike the forces that brought them about. In January, the actor Shia LaBeouf mounted an art installation designed to protest the president. The next month, neo-Nazis who organized on the message board 4chan crashed the show, where they started chugging from milk jugs—because northern Europeans digest milk well, or because milk is … white. In other words, an innocent dairy beverage as old as time had been conscripted as a Donald Trump surrogate on the internet. It was yet another message-board in-joke—freighted with political meaning—suddenly in the news.

But weirdness, perhaps, is what happens when a movement grows very quickly and without any strong ideological direction—from a disciplined party, from traditional institutions

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