NPR

After Hurricane Katrina, Many People Found New Strength

A long-term study of people who survived Hurricane Katrina found that most were doing well, and some feel the experience transformed them. But others remain haunted by anxiety and depression.
A Houston resident walks through waist-deep water while evacuating her home after severe flooding following Hurricane Harvey in north Houston. / Win McNamee / Getty Images

Long after the floodwaters recede and the debris is cleared, the mental health impacts of disasters like hurricanes can linger.

Psychologist Jean Rhodes of the University of Massachusetts-Boston has spent more than a decade studying what happens to people years after a natural disaster — in this case, Hurricane Katrina.

She and her team had been studying the health of young parents attending community college in New Orleans starting.

Sie lesen eine Vorschau. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen.

Mehr von NPR

NPR3 min gelesenSociety
Tracking The Pandemic: How Quickly Is The Coronavirus Spreading State By State?
View our map and graphics to see where COVID-19 is hitting hardest in the U.S., which state outbreaks are growing the fastest and which are leveling off.
NPR3 min gelesen
Our Daily Breather: Ketch Secor Is Listening To Music From Around The Globe
In Our Daily Breather, we ask artists how to find calm in the midst of the COVID-19 crisis. Old Crow Medicine Show's Ketch Secor has been seeking solace in the music of artists from across the globe.
NPR4 min gelesenPolitics
4 Takeaways From Beijing's Hong Kong Power Grab
Hong Kong is supposed to be a semiautonomous enclave of China, "one country, two systems." But China is moving to impose a sweeping national security law on the city, which critics say is illegal.