The Atlantic

Can Rich Millennials Be Convinced to Give Their Money Away?

A nonprofit helping wealthy young progressives become active philanthropists has gained new life under the Trump administration.
Source: Andrew Burton / Reuters

When Emily Kirkland, a self-described climate-change activist, was attempting to come to terms with the fact that she has what she describes as “direct access” to a trust fund worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, she did what many of us would do: She turned to the internet.

And that was how she discovered, the almost 20-year-old nonprofit that works with wealthy people between the ages of 18 and 35 to encourage them to devote a portion of their financial assets to left-wing causes including addressing the

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