NPR

'I Don't Believe In Science,' Says Flat-Earther Set To Launch Himself In Own Rocket

"Mad" Mike Hughes plans to take the rocket built from salvaged metal on a flight across the Mojave Desert on Saturday. His stated mission: to overturn two millennia of scientific understanding.

On Saturday, a limousine driver plans to launch himself on a mile-long flight over the Mojave Desert in a rocket of his own making.

His name is "Mad" Mike Hughes, his steam-powered rocket is built of salvaged metals, his launchpad is repurposed from a used mobile home — and he is confident this will mark the first step toward proving the Earth is flat, after all.

"It's the most interesting story in of his jury-rigged quest to overturn more than two millennia of scientific knowledge. And the whole thing is costing him just $20,000, according to the AP. (It goes without saying, but we'll say this anyway: )

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR6 min read
After Grim Deaths In The Borderlands, An Effort To Find Out Who Migrants Were
More than 200 migrants die attempting to cross the Southwest border each year. Slowly, scientists at a Texas laboratory are seeking the story of their bones.
NPR5 min read
2-Tiered Wages Under Fire: Workers Challenge Unequal Pay For Equal Work
For years after the Great Recession, employers were reluctant to boost wages. Now a tight labor market is giving workers the leverage they need to demand a larger slice of the nation's economic pie.
NPR1 min readTech
U.S. Postal Service Is Testing Self-Driving Trucks
The two-week pilot program will put five autonomous semi-trucks on the road, making the journey between Phoenix and Dallas.