The Christian Science Monitor

In atomized Britain, a collective push to tackle loneliness

A woman walks down a residential street lined with typical row houses in London. In response to increasing concerns over social isolation in modern Britain, Prime Minister Theresa May has appointed the country's first minister of loneliness. Source: Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff

Frank Buckley, a widowed retiree, puts the kettle on after spending his second day this week doing woodwork in an old converted barn with a group of other men. His group of amateur carpenters are part of a national initiative for socially isolated Britons called – what else? – The Men’s Shed project that has opened more than 400 communal sheds for men who have retired or are unable to work due to disability or unemployment.

“It’s good because a few men get together, have a cup of tea and help each other with bits and pieces using the wood lathe and other tools,” says

An unhealthy problemA respite from Brexit

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