The Christian Science Monitor

How to make science experiments as common at home as bedtime stories

On a recent Saturday, Sage and Aven Davis – aged 8 and 5 – are eagerly experimenting with oil, water, glitter, glow sticks, food coloring, and AlkaSeltzer to make “lava lamps.”

Sage’s is glowing a bright green, while Aven’s has turned to a muddy brown – “like chocolate,” she says happily, shaking the container to make it fizz. Eventually, when the lamps are finished, they move on to a project that allows them to create electrical devices from everyday items like fruit and playdough.

The family is one of dozens that came out to a Boulder, Colo., event sponsored by Science Galaxy, a local organization that encourages kids and their parents to come together around science, curiosity, and critical

The push for more supportCombine literacy and science

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