Bloomberg Businessweek

Under Fire and Losing Trust

Facebook’s attempt to play the victim isn’t shifting attention from its product problems

On March 20, Facebook employees were quiet even for Facebook employees, buried in the news on their phones as they shuffled to a meeting in one of the largest cafeterias at headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Mark Zuckerberg, their chief executive officer, had always told them Facebook Inc.’s growth was good for the world. Sheryl Sandberg, their chief operating officer, had preached the importance of openness. Neither appeared in the cafeteria. Instead, the company sent a lawyer.

The context: reports in the New York Times and the Observer the previous weekend that Cambridge Analytica, the political consulting firm

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