TIME

No more chemo for certain types of breast cancer

The majority of newly diagnosed breast cancers in the U.S. may not require chemotherapy

PHYLLIS LACETTI FOUND HER OWN BREAST CANCER WHEN she felt an abnormal lump in her right breast in 2007. A nurse at Montefiore Medical Center, she had a lumpectomy to remove it, but an MRI afterward revealed remaining cancer cells, so she opted to get a mastectomy.

Her cancer doctor recommended that she get chemotherapy to ensure that her cancer wouldn’t recur, since Lacetti’s family history put her at high risk. Her sister and father had died of leukemia, and her brother passed away from thyroid cancer. Chemotherapy, he said, was her best option for preventing the cancer from coming back.

But Lacetti was reluctant to get the toxic therapy. “I saw my sister suffer, I saw my brother suffer, and I didn’t know if that’s what I wanted to do,” she

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