The Atlantic

NASA's Space Probes Shouldn't Be Tacky Billboards

Apollo, Voyager, Hubble … The Dorito?
Source: NASA

The year is 2043. A skyscraper-tall rocket sits atop a launchpad. The engines ignite with a roar. The rocket lurches upward, climbing higher and higher until it leaves Earth’s atmosphere. In space, the nose of the rocket breaks open and releases its payload. It’s the most powerful space telescope in history, built by NASA to photograph Earth-like exoplanets orbiting stars like our own. The technology is so advanced that the telescope can detect shapes of oceans, clusters of vegetation, and peaks of volcanoes.

The telescope unfurls its mirrors. Its name is emblazoned in large, silvery letters across its side: the Budweiser

Sie lesen eine Vorschau. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen.

Mehr von The Atlantic

The Atlantic7 min gelesenPsychology
The Role Of Cognitive Dissonance In The Pandemic
The minute we make any decision—I think COVID-19 is serious; no, I’m sure it is a hoax—we begin to justify the wisdom of our choice and find reasons to dismiss the alternative.
The Atlantic14 min gelesen
How a Fake Baby Is Born
For years, women on the internet have been writing conspiracy theories about celebrity pregnancies. What sparks them?
The Atlantic17 min gelesenSociety
All the President’s Lies About the Coronavirus
Editor’s Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here. Updated at 1:56 p.m. ET on July 13, 2020. President Donald Trump has repeatedly lied about the coronavirus pandemic and the c