PC Magazine

Asus ROG Rapture GT-AC5300 Router: Features for Gamers

PC MAGAZINE EDITORS’ CHOICE

Asus ROG Rapture

GT-AC5300

$379.49

4.5/5 Stars

PROS Speedy throughput performance. Lots of gamer-friendly features. Eight LAN ports. Works with Alexa voice commands and IFTTT applets. Slick user interface.

CONS Expensive. Huge footprint. Middling file-transfer speeds.

Hardcore gamers rely on fast systems with blazing graphics cards to gain an edge while competing online, but all that speedy hardware means nothing if your router can’t deliver the throughput needed to overcome network lag. Enter the Asus ROG Rapture GT-AC5300, a high-end tri-band router designed for gamers. This beast of a router looks the part and offers hardware- and software-based gaming acceleration and prioritization, a whole heap of LAN ports, robust protection against malware and viruses, and a powerful quad-core processor. It’s expensive and big, but its speedy performance and robust features make it a must-have whether you’re a serious online gamer or you manage a high-traffic home network.

LARGE AND IN CHARGE

At 2.5 by 9.6 by 9.6 inches

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