Popular Science

The oldest weapons in North America offer a new view of prehistoric tech

The Paleoamerican migration plot thickens.
a sliver of rock sharpened to a rounded point, on mud

A 15,000 year old stemmed point.

Texas A&M University

History exists in the past, but that doesn’t mean it’s static. New findings, published Wednesday in Science Advances, illustrate the discovery of a dozen projectile points at the Debra L. Friedkin site from the Buttermilk Creek complex in Central Texas. Those spearheads date back to more than 13,500 years ago, making them possibly the oldest weapons ever found in North America, and also painting a more complex picture of what we previously thought we knew about the continent’s first humans.

Spear points are a pretty iconic aspect of the , an old culture of Paeloamerican hunter-gatherers. Those points typically date back to between 13,000 and 12,700 years ago, and are lanceolate

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

Related Interests

More from Popular Science

Popular Science4 min read
These Plants Bring All The Birds To Your Yard
Carolina chickadees depend on the availability of high-calorie, high-protein prey, such as caterpillars, for a healthy breeding season. Doug Tallamy, University of Delaware Like songbirds? Right, many people do. It’s a different story when it comes t
Popular Science3 min read
Blow Flies Help Us Solve Murders—but Climate Change Is Forcing Them Out
A chrysomya megacephala, commonly known as a blow fly. Muhammad Mahdi Karim Climate change has spurred the spread of invasive insects that devour crops, destroy homes, and spread disease. Now, rising temperatures are driving cadaver-eating blow flies
Popular Science3 min readTech
Not All Twitter Bots Are Bad
All my friends are bots. Eleanor Cummins and her incredible screenshotting abilities Twitter is cracking down on bots. A fundamental part of the social media platform’s appeal, these automated accounts provide information—and comedy and artistry—in w