SAIL

Handheld VHF Radios

For many sailors, cell phones have become their primary means of both ship-to-shore and ship-to-ship communication. Even the Coast Guard will often ask for a cell number after it receives a distress call. None of this, however, makes a VHF radio any less important—and this goes just as much for a handheld as any fixed-mount model.

There are a number of reasons for this: first and foremost, the fact that despite the seeming ubiquity of cell coverage these days, it is still far from total, even for those sailing coastal. Of course, for those going off shore or venturing to remote locals, cell coverage simply isn’t part of the equation.

Beyond that, while it may be convenient to call ahead to a marina or make dinner reservations by phone, VHF remains the primary means of making a distress call, either to the Coast Guard or any

Sie lesen eine Vorschau. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen.

Mehr von Sail

Sail4 min gelesen
Dufour 360
When you have a successful product, you don’t completely change its design. You tweak it. The Dufour 360 is a well tweaked version of the Dufour 350, and the changes are quite worthwhile. Dufour has always been a step above many standard production b
Sail3 min gelesen
Bright Lights, Wednesday Nights
A dozen or so years ago, my wife, Julie, and I arrived at the Cedar Point Yacht Club’s parking lot in Westport, Connecticut, with little more than dreams and ambitions. We’d been told the people there, all strangers, sometimes needed help racing thei
Sail6 min gelesen
Flying Blind
It was a dark night, utterly black. Any light was blanketed by the fog. My chartplotter was night-blinding me. I looked at the Navionics map on my phone, waited half a second for my eyes to adjust and then looked at the depthsounder. After that I loo