Artist Profile

ROBERT BESANKO

WHAT WAS IT LIKE FOR YOU TO BE IN A PHOTOGRAPHIC darkroom for the first time?

I remember it very well. I couldn’t have been older than two, because the darkroom was in Temora (NSW) and we moved to East Melbourne when I was three. I remember being very affected by the metaphysics of the darkroom: the black velvet curtain, the darkness, the red light, the equipment, and the way my father and his friend were really into photography, it was remarkable.

Were there other art forms?

As a boy I loved painting, listening to music and learning to play the piano. But I was also into sailing, swimming and tennis and they evoked my ability for concentration and helped me win races and competitions. But I disliked any attention, especially being praised, I am very uncomfortable with success. Attention traumatised me so much, there were moments I couldn’t engage in my achievements. This anxiety has affected my entire life, even right now talking to you, I feel I shouldn’t be speaking. Art grew in

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Artist Profile

Artist Profile4 min read
Murray Fredericks
When you began photographing you were travelling through places like Iran and Pakistan. What was it about those landscapes that appealed to you? The first thing was that I enjoyed the time and the space. I started becoming fascinated with little moti
Artist Profile5 min read
Anita LARKIN
How do you start a work? I interact with an object in a physical, curious way, much like little children do. Children don’t have any preconceived ideas about what the object is expected to be, does or means, they just play with it. So that’s my start
Artist Profile8 min read
Tim Storrier: An Unlikely Liaison
I first met Tim Storrier in 1987 when, as a freelance journalist, I was asked by the Melbourne Age newspaper to do a profile on the artist following the release of a major monograph on Storrier authored by Linda van Nunen. It was, in its way, an awkw