Fast Company

THE NETFLIX SHUFFLE

CAN THE STREAMING GIANT GET SERIOUS ABOUT MOVIES WITHOUT ALIENATING FILMMAKERS?

Last summer, Netflix offered Hollywood something unexpected: a rare peek inside the highly secretive streaming service. The company rented out a huge L.A. sound-stage and invited each of the major talent agencies to come one by one and watch presentations from the heads of Netflix’s many divisions—from unscripted series to stand-up comedy—as they outlined the company’s ambitions. For Netflix to lavish this kind of attention on agencies—one attendee described the food offerings as “craft services gone wild”—it wanted something. The primary, not-so-secret message to the gatekeepers of the world’s biggest stars? Please make Netflix your destination, not your last resort, for making movies. “How do we convince A-list actors and directors to work at our studio?” is how one agent who was there describes the subtext of Netflix’s message. “How

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