The Atlantic

Even Now, Brexit Remains Impossible to Understand

International correspondents have the particularly challenging task of reporting on Brexit’s significance for readers who don’t follow its every twist and turn.
Source: Dylan Martinez / Reuters

LONDON—“There is a complete meltdown going on here,” Stephen Castle, a U.K. correspondent for The New York Times and a veteran journalist who has been based in Brussels and London for more than a quarter century, told me during another hectic week in Brexit Britain. “It’s a very slow-motion and incremental one, and that makes it harder to bring to light.”

For even the most seasoned analysts and reporters, Brexit has proved to be a political labyrinth. It’s a tumultuous moment for Britain—perhaps the most tumultuous to befall the country since World War II. Britain’s decision to leave the European Union is rife with extreme political and economic consequences. And yet, nearly three years of , , and later, Brexit remains seemingly impossible to understand. For the journalists tasked with covering this story, decoding and

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