TIME

SOUTH AFRICA’S DIVIDING LINE

Twenty-five years after Nelson Mandela was first elected, the country remains two unequal nations
The informal settlement of Imizamo Yethu overlooks Hout Bay, a picturesque suburb of Cape Town

EVEN FOR THE WESTERN CAPE, A PROVINCE KNOWN for its stunning vistas, the view from the settlement of Imizamo Yethu is extraordinary. A panorama of rolling hills, sand dunes and stone cliffs unfurls to the sea. To one side is a fishing village that has gentrified into quaint cafés and handicraft shops; on the other are stately mansions, horse paddocks and the expansive campus of a prestigious private school.

The view of Imizamo Yethu from the suburb below, Hout Bay, is also extraordinary, if for different reasons. This ramshackle settlement clinging to a rock escarpment is made up of small brick houses, corrugated-aluminum shacks and lean-tos constructed from old shipping pallets. The few paved roads intersect with a network of mud paths that reek of raw sewage in the summer heat, and flood under winter rains. More than 6,000 black families live in this area, which is about the size of a suburban American shopping mall. Hout Bay, which is about 50 times larger and mostly white, has roughly the same number of residents. Violence in Imizamo Yethu is rife; in April, five people were killed in a shoot-out between rival transport cartels that run the minibus networks linking the settlement to central Cape Town, 12 miles away.

A few days after the minibus shootings, Kenny Tokwe, a community organizer who has been living in Imizamo Yethu for nearly 30 years, looks down on Hout Bay’s idyllic expanse. It’s been 25 years since South Africa’s first multiracial democratic elections, held on April 27, 1994, were supposed to bring an end to the institutionalized racial segregation of the apartheid regime. But little has changed, says Tokwe. “South Africa is

Sie lesen eine Vorschau. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen.

Mehr von TIME

TIME1 min gelesenMedical
Racism In Medicine
Our new report published in Health Affairs examined four leading medical journals and found that they almost never publish scientific articles that name racism as a driver of poor health outcomes. Of the more than 200,000 total articles published ove
TIME16 min gelesen
Pioneers
By Lucy Feldman IT’S ABOUT 12 MINUTES INTO THE Q&A WHEN REESE Witherspoon starts to cry. “A long time ago, people drew some lines on this world,” she says, reflecting on families separated by immigration policy. “We are just part of a common humanity
TIME6 min gelesen
Uzo Aduba Will See You Now
THERE ARE A FEW WORDS, UZO ADUBA points out, that we tend to whisper. Therapy is one of them. Saying it out loud is more than part of the job for the actor, who’s preparing for the May 23 premiere of her latest show: a new installment of HBO’s 2008–2