The Atlantic

Tip Your Hotel Maid

My grandmother worked in housekeeping for 10 years—and it’s a job where you could use a gratuity.
Source: Nir Elias / Reuters

As I check out of a hotel, various excuses race through my head for not tipping the housekeeper. I’m in a big rush. I don’t have cash. Will the maid who folded my clothes get the money? Why can’t I just add a gratuity to the credit-card bill and expense it?

About 70 percent of hotel guests go through the same mental exercise and end up not leaving a tip. A waiter would have to spit in your soup, and you would have to see him do it, to stiff him. Housekeepers are stiffed every day. I’ve heard every reason why guests treat hotel workers so differently than other service workers, but I’ve not heard a good one.

I have more than a passing interest in the subject. For 10 years, my grandmother, Nellie O’Connor McCreary, was a maid at the Hotel Washington, now the W Hotel. If you lean over the railing of its rooftop bar after a drink or two, you’d

Sie lesen eine Vorschau. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen.

Mehr von The Atlantic

The Atlantic6 min gelesenPolitics
Americans Can Handle the Truth. Mueller Needs to Give It to Them.
If former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s testimony will have any value tomorrow, it should be to guide Congress to satisfy its constitutionally distinct role. Mueller, a former FBI director, has always displayed a “just the facts approach.” He alre
The Atlantic5 min gelesenPolitics
Bill Barr Already Won
President Trump’s attorney general had the first word on the Mueller investigation. It may end up being the final word.
The Atlantic5 min gelesenPolitics
Iran Is Acting Like the International Villain of Trump’s Prophecy
Any number of relatively mundane scenarios now have the potential to escalate U.S.-Iran tensions—from a fire at a militia base to the seizure of an oil tanker to the signal-jamming of a drone.