Los Angeles Times

California Supreme Court backs greater access to police misconduct cases

SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court decided unanimously Monday that the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department and other law enforcement agencies may alert prosecutors that a deputy who is slated to testify in a criminal case has a history of misconduct.

The decision overturned a Court of Appeal ruling that barred the sheriff from giving prosecutors the names of deputies who had committed misconduct, including lying, taking bribes, tampering with evidence, using unreasonable force or engaging in domestic violence.

By law, prosecutors

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