Yoga Journal

Second Act

JANA LONG is a yoga therapist, wellness educator, meditation facilitator, mentor, and managing director of Power of One Yoga School of Ayurveda & Meditation Arts, and cofounder and executive director of the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance. She is the author and editor of Yoga as a Peace Practice, a curriculum and social movement that brings contemplative practice to individuals and communities impacted by violence. She inspires and empowers people 60 years and older to revitalize their bodies and spirits with yoga practices specially designed with aging bodies in mind.

In 2008, I was a 56-year-old director of news technology services in the newsroom of the Washington Post and began to hear rumors that retirement buyouts would be offered to select employees. The whisper was that this round of buyouts would deeply cut the workforce. I saw the writing on the wall and gave serious thought to my future.

By the end of the first quarter of 2008, the talk of buyouts transformed from rumor to reality. With 19 years on the job, I was eligible. The time had come, and I was ready for my pink slip. I decided to turn this transition into an opportunity to realize some of my

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