TIME

IT CAN BE A BOY, A GIRL, NEITHER OR BOTH

WITH A GENDER-NEUTRAL DOLL, MATTEL IS HOPING TO BREAK TABOOS AND APPEAL TO A GENERATION THAT DEMANDS SOCIAL JUSTICE IN BRANDS

A CHILD OPENS A BOX. He starts jumping and screaming with joy—not an unusual sound in the halls of Mattel’s headquarters where researchers test new toys. But this particular toy is a doll, and it’s rare for parents to bring boys into these research groups to play with dolls. It’s rarer still for a boy to immediately attach himself to one the way Shi’a just did.

An 8-year-old who considers himself gender-fluid and whose favorite color is black one week, pink the next, Shi’a sometimes plays with his younger sister’s dolls at home, but they’re “girly princess stuff,” he says dismissively. This doll, with its prepubescent body and childish features, looks more like him, right down to the wave of bleached blond bangs. “The hair is just like mine,” Shi’a says, swinging his head in tandem with the doll’s. Then he turns to the playmate in the toy-testing room, a 7-year-old girl named Jhase, and asks, “Should I put on the girl hair?” Shi’a fits a long, blond wig on the doll’s head, and suddenly it is no longer an avatar for him but for his sister.

The doll can be a boy, a girl, neither or both, and Mattel, which calls this the world’s first gender-neutral doll, is hoping its launch on Sept. 25 redefines who gets to play with a toy traditionally deemed taboo for half the world’s kids. Carefully manicured features betray no obvious gender: the lips are not too full, the eyelashes not too long and fluttery, the jaw not too wide. There are no Barbie-like breasts or broad, Ken-like shoulders. Each doll in the Creatable World series looks like a slender 7-year-old with short hair, but each comes with a wig of long, lustrous locks and a wardrobe befitting any fashion-conscious kid: hoodies, sneakers, graphic T-shirts in soothing greens and yellows, along with tutus and camo pants.

Mattel’s first promotional spot for the $29.99 product features a series of kids who go by various pronouns—him, her, them, xem—and the slogan “A doll line designed to keep labels out

Sie lesen eine Vorschau. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen.

Mehr von TIME

TIME2 min gelesen
Reimagining The Empire
“I’M FASCINATED BY THE GRANDEUR, the pompousness, the overmuch,” says Kara Walker. That sensibility fueled the American artist’s latest creation, Fons Americanus—a 13-m-high fountain unveiled Sept. 30 in London’s Tate Modern museum. With a cast of ch
TIME3 min gelesen
Survivors Are Also Voters
This month marks the two-year anniversary of the #MeToo hashtag, but it also marks the start of a monumental shift. In just a few hours, sexual violence, including harassment, went from a topic seldom discussed on mainstream platforms to one that dom
TIME4 min gelesen
Conversation
WHAT YOU SAID ABOUT ... HER CASE Molly Ball’s Oct. 14 profile of U.S. Senator Kamala Harris left readers divided on how far the California Democrat will go in the 2020 presidential race. Fred Wirtz of West Bend, Iowa, said the story convinced him H