The Guardian

'Waking up to our power': witchcraft gets political

One eve of Witchfest event, radicals say they believe magic and occult are natural extensions of feminism and eco activism
Grace Gottardello, 27, is a self-described witch. Photograph: Christian Sinibaldi/The Guardian

The south London borough of Croydon, often derided as the capital’s most unloved suburb, is the birthplace of dubstep and London’s modern tram network. But the area now lays claim to a new title: the UK’s witch capital.

On Saturday, about 4,000 pagans and witches will descend on Croydon to delve further into the occult. While many are simply drawn to the aesthetics of being a witch, there are a growing number of radicals in the country who believe

Sie lesen eine Vorschau. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen.

Mehr von The Guardian

The Guardian6 min gelesen
Crime, Power Cuts, Poverty: 30 Years On, The Townships Question Nelson Mandela’s Legacy
As South Africa marks 30 years since the anti-apartheid leader’s release from prison, some people on the streets where he once lived now see him as a sellout’ rather than a hero
The Guardian8 min gelesen
‘You Have To Face The Darkness Within You’: Meet The Real-life Jedi Knights
It started as an online prank, but Jediism now claims more UK adherents than Scientology. But is it a religion, a philosophy – or just a joke?
The Guardian3 min gelesenPolitics
From Khat To Coffee: Revitalising An Age-old Yemeni Crop
In Haraz, farmers and exporters are bringing new life to a globally acclaimed and desired product