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Viral Social Media Posts Offer False Coronavirus Tips

Quick Take

Posts are circulating false and misleading tips on social media — in some cases wrongly attributed to Stanford University — about how people can monitor and avoid the coronavirus.


Full Story 

As the U.S. and countries around the world work to address the pandemic spread of COVID-19, posts disseminated by tens of thousands on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter are feeding misinformation to people about how to avoid and self-test for the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

The  a   about the virus, such as wrongly instructing people to hold their breath to gauge whether they’ve been infected and falsely suggesting that water consumption can kill the virus. posted on the Instagram account of actress Debra Messing, which has since been deleted. They were also widely in screenshots on Twitter.

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