The Atlantic

Why Kids Might Be Key to Reaching Herd Immunity

Children rarely get very ill from COVID-19. But there’s another reason to vaccinate them.
Source: REUTERS/Flavio Lo Sc

A few days after Christmas, Molly Hering, 14, and her brother, Sam, 12, got their first shots as part of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine trials for kids. Their mom had heard about a clinical trial being conducted at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, and Molly told me that she’d agreed to join because she wanted to contribute to the vaccine-development effort.

Molly and Sam’s dad was recently hospitalized with COVID-19. (He recovered.) Both kids have spent most of the past year dealing with Zoom school and its attendant technical glitches. Molly finally went back to in-person ninth grade this month, but masks and social distancing are required at school. Like everyone else, she’s looking forward to the end of the pandemic. “I’ll finally be able to go to school normally,” she said.

With COVID-19 vaccines proven to be safe and effective in most adults, and have both begun U.S. trials for kids as young as 12. And if those trials go smoothly, the vaccines

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