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Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace . . . One School at a Time

Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace . . . One School at a Time

Geschrieben von Greg Mortenson und David Oliver Relin

Erzählt von Patrick Lawlor


Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace . . . One School at a Time

Geschrieben von Greg Mortenson und David Oliver Relin

Erzählt von Patrick Lawlor

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (300 Bewertungen)
Länge:
13 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 15, 2006
ISBN:
9781400172511
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

In 1993 Greg Mortenson was the exhausted survivor of a failed attempt to ascend K2, an American climbing bum wandering emaciated and lost through Pakistan's Karakoram Himalaya. After he was taken in and nursed back to health by the people of an impoverished Pakistani village, Mortenson promised to return one day and build them a school. From that rash, earnest promise grew one of the most incredible humanitarian campaigns of our time-Greg Mortenson's one-man mission to counteract extremism by building schools, especially for girls, throughout the breeding ground of the Taliban.



Award-winning journalist David Oliver Relin has collaborated on this spellbinding account of Mortenson's incredible accomplishments in a region where Americans are often feared and hated. In pursuit of his goal, Mortenson has survived kidnapping, fatwas issued by enraged mullahs, repeated death threats, and wrenching separations from his wife and children. But his success speaks for itself. At last count, his Central Asia Institute had built fifty-five schools. Three Cups of Tea is at once an unforgettable adventure and the inspiring true story of how one man really is changing the world-one school at a time.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 15, 2006
ISBN:
9781400172511
Format:
Hörbuch


Über den Autor

Greg Mortenson is the director of the Central Asia Institute. A resident of Montana, he spends several months of the year in Pakistan and Afghanistan. David Oliver Relin is a contributing editor for Parade magazine and Skiing magazine. He has won more than forty national awards for his work as a writer and editor.

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3.7
300 Bewertungen / 286 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    Fascinating and heart warming tale of climber Greg Mortenson's attempts to build schools and educate some of the poorest communities in Pakistan and Afghanistan. A real insight into a difficult region and a reminder that at the heart of the stories of war are many normal people fighting to make life better for themselves and their families. A great read.
  • (3/5)
    Inspirational story.
  • (3/5)
    The first few chapters are going really slow. Yeah, yeah, yeah...we know Greg Mortenson is an amazing person that everyone loves and has lots of gumption. We don't need a resume showing off as a character witness. Get to the actual story!Update: Ok, it was much of the same throughout the book. Mortenson showing off how spartan he can live while doing everything selflessly for others, little character development for the children he's doing all of this for, the idea of actually getting teachers for the schools is entirely glossed over (the book is so damn fixated on the logistics of the buildings).
  • (5/5)
    This is an extremely engaging book! I just couldn't put it down! It is about the co-founder of the Central Asian Institute, who was mountaineer climbing K2. As he was coming back from attempting the climb, he got lost in Pakistan. A village took him and brought him back to health. This lit a fire to help the people in Pakistan to become better educated, and improve the quality of their lives. By doing so, he has also realized that building schools promote peace, and tolerance.
  • (3/5)
    This was on my to-read list for a long time but I just couldn't seem to pick it up. Then it became a pick for my reading club. I missed the book club meeting and still hadn't finished the book two weeks afterward. It's just the kind of story that takes you a while. One of those books where the comment "it has a lot of words" meets nods of understanding.While the story is quite good and morally awakening, the power of Mortenson's activism can get lostin all the descriptions. Since it's a plot you know before beginning the first chapter - Mortenson asmountain climber turned do-gooder builds schools in Pakistan, especially for girls - the narrative turnslengthy with small anecdotes that slow the progress of the reader in much the way that politics and turfwars impeded Mortenson's building; these details are important, but just get really old really quickly.Certainly a must-read for anyone wanting an emotional pick-me-up, but definitely lacks the structure of a good novel.
  • (5/5)
    Greg Mortenson's journey to become a great humanitarian was all but accidental, but his example is now a phenomenal model for the way in which one human being can quite literally make the world a better place, infecting thousands of individuals with a drive for education, for peace, and for understanding. The account of this journey given in Three Cups of Tea, artfully delivered by Mortenson himself and David Oliver Relin, is nothing less than required reading for any individual who feels strongly that this world--and the people who call it home--is worth believing in, and worth effort.By tracing Mortenson's journey from grief-stricken and hapless mountaineer to humanitarian miracle-worker and educator, this work brings to life the educational and peace-driving efforts of Mortenson and his Central Asia Institute, based in Montana and working tirelessly for the education and improvement of individuals in some of the world's most dangerous environments. And yet, through conflict, through logistical nightmares, through violence, and through a lack of resources, Mortenson has managed to create a magnificent effort, and the achievements to match.Simply, this book should be required reading for everyone, regardless of age or location. It's an inspiring account, and more than that, a representation of efforts and engagements which must be shared, understood, and celebrated. In all honesty, the world will be a better place with each single person who reads this work.Absolutely recommended.
  • (1/5)
    As a book club selection, I was eager to delve into a book I wouldn't traditionally select on my own. That's one of the hidden beauties of book clubs - opening yourself up to books out of your habits and find otherwise hidden gems.

    I realize this book has moved many, many other readers. Not so much for this reader.
  • (4/5)
    I resisted this book for a long time despite the appeal of its topic, largely because of its popularity as a book club book. And we all know I'm a snob like that, despite my claiming of the bookslut title. Anyway, when Tava sent me a copy, it erased most of my excuses not to read it.

    I'm very glad I finally did read it. The author, through a chance encounter, develops a relationship with the people of a small, remote village in Pakistan, and pledges to build them a school. This, despite his limited income, working only enough as a nurse to finance his many mountain-climbing expeditions, incredibly limited contacts, and complete lack of fundraising experience. Still, he somehow succeeds, and goes on to build dozens of schools, despite the opposition of corrupt local organizers and mullahs, a kidnapping at gunpoint, wars and rapidly changing political climates. What he accomplishes is truly amazing, though it makes the rise of violent Islamic factions toward the end of the book all the more depressing.

    Highly recommended to anyone who wants to better understand what's going on in the region, and to anyone who believes in the power of education.
  • (3/5)
    The writing isn't great, but the story is VERY interesting. I thought the author came across as self-centered and somewhat selfish, but perhaps that is the fault of the writing. Still, he has accomplished SO much, and I really like his message.
  • (5/5)
    I love what Mortenson is doing in Pakistan and Afghanistan.
  • (3/5)
    This book covered wonderful content. The writing style, however was very blah. I finished the book and gave it 3 stars simply because of the wonderful topic of educating women and children in Pakistan and Afghanistan.
  • (3/5)
    I should start by saying that I really think Greg Mortenson is doing really good work and I value his philosophy of fighting terrorism with education instead of violence. That being said, I didn't really like this book as much as I'd hoped. The back of the book refered to Greg Mortenson as a "real-life Indiana Jones" and the entire book followed in that vain of some sort of adventure novel with Greg Mortenson as the hero. I most enjoyed the parts of the book that focused on the political and social situations of Pakistan and Afghanistan and why there are so few schools and Mortenson had such a difficult mission. I got bored and annoyed with Mortenson's trials and tribulations as he played the hero. I'm sure this has nothing to do with Mortenson's character, it just the manner in which the story was told.
  • (2/5)
    Synopsis
    Three Cups of Tea is the story of mountain climber/humanitarian Greg Mortenson as told by David Oliver Relin. After failing to make it to the top of mountain K2, Mortenson stumbles across a village in Pakistan that has no schools. Seeing children practicing lessons without a teacher by scratching with sticks in the dirt moves Mortenson, and he makes it his goal to get a school in every village of Pakistan. The book follows his life during this journey and gives some background so we better understand him and his motivations.

    Review
    I feel kind of bad for not liking this book. It's centered around humanitarian work and education, two things that every good person is supposed to be in support of. And it's not that I disagree with the message here, I just didn't like reading about it.

    Mortenson's mission is noble and interesting, but the story itself is repetitive, and shows just how tedious humanitarian work can get. Granted, I didn't get very far into the story before calling it quits, so maybe it gets better, but when I left off I felt like I'd read the same two chapters three times.

    Considering how much I've heard about this book and how often I see it around, I was disappointed.

  • (3/5)
    A former mountain-climber and nurse made his life's mission to raise support for education in the mountains of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Not well written, but a fascinating tale.
  • (4/5)
    Reading this book gave me a chance to learn about the situation in Pakistan and Afghanistan from the ground level and one person's continued effort and successful effort to help. That the book is also well written helps the reader keep focus and find inspiration to make a similar effort each in our own way.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed listening to this as an audio book. It takes you into their lives and makes you admire them but in the end the book had a very political slant. We (Americans) are bad and cause the problems not the poverty or politics of the area. I'm afraid Greg Mortenson lost his perspective after a time.
  • (4/5)
    An humanitarian adventure story. Inspiring in the sense that you will wonder what you've been doing with your life while Greg Mortenson has been out climbing mountains and building schools, especially schools for girls, in the Karakoram Mountain villages of Pakistan (Baltistan) and across the border in Afghanistan.
  • (4/5)
    Once I got into it, I really liked this book. Amazing, hopeful.
  • (4/5)
    Five stars for inspiration and subject matter, two and half for flat writing. It's good to read it just to see how God can use one man to make a difference in many lives.
  • (3/5)

    I mentioned many of my deeper thoughts on this book in a previous post. My mom bought me this book so, thanks, mom! But she has no idea the hare-brained ideas I get from reading these books.

    Mortenson is impressive. He is driven with a singular purpose-- build schools, primarily for girls, where there are no schools other than radical Islamic madrasas.

    One overall message I get from this book (and that Mortenson got to deliver to the Pentagon and Congress) is that the only way to win the war on terror is to build trust and promote education. Dropping bombs that sometimes kill civilians only serves to alienate people and deepen their resentment of the West. If the only American a rural Afghan sees is one carrying lethal weapons then we've lost the war on terror. Mortenson saw too many students in his rural villages become "collateral damage."

    At one point the Pentagon offers to give Mortenson millions of dollars, covertly through off-shore accounts, to build schools. But he declines because the attachment to the military was too big a risk to take. I had read previous interviews and op-eds by Mortenson before reading this book, which had already shaped my views on the war. But the book isn't about the war, it's about improving the outcomes of thousands of kids that had either been neglected or forgotten.

    Questions I asked while reading this book:
    Why hadn't anyone done this before?
    Why didn't the government build schools?
    Why didn't private charities, Islamic or otherwise, or other NGOs build these schools?
    Why didn't the locals, who built their own houses and often shared the wealth of the village, build these schools?

    I think the villages didn't build these schools themselves because they had more pressing needs, or it was seen as a somewhat wasteful use of materials and labor. It took an outsider to put up the capital for the new investment to take place. And it took a commitment of ongoing funds from Mortenson's foundation to pay the teachers and provide supplies-- without which the buildings would be worthless. In some cases, maybe the idea had never occurred to them. Many were used to the idea that their children would never be able to compete with children from larger towns, so it never occurred to them to try.

    Mortenson found ways to build these schools cheaper than the World Bank, the local governments, or an NGO ever could. There was basically no red tape for him.

    I'd like to read his sequel.

    4 stars out of 5. You have to assume the profound statements the locals make throughout the book, sometimes in uneducated English, were properly understood/translated. And you know they were edited for clarity. Sometimes assuming Mortenson somehow (almost magically) had the language skills to properly translate was a bit of a stretch of faith for me. But I trust the authors strove for accuracy and authenticity. It's an amazing story.
  • (3/5)
    I loved the story and it makes me wish there were more people in the world who were willing to do things like this. The writing itself left something to be desired, but it seemed to go along with the theme of the book that it really was just a guy who decided to do something and didn't really know what he was getting himself into. After reading the book, I heard a rumor that many of the details were fictional. Hopefully, this was not the case.
  • (3/5)
    I read the first half. Truly, what he did was amazing. BUT I just couldn't read anymore. The writing wasn't great, although the subject matter was. I'm glad there are people in the world willing to work so hard.
  • (3/5)
    This was a well put together account of a hiker's mission to build schools in the mountains of Pakistan. Highlights included him getting told that 'a village called New York' had been bombed on September 11 (and a tribal elder staring at the mountains of Afghanistan and saying 'your problem comes from there'). High on the inspiration list were stories of the young women who became the first educated women in their region.
  • (5/5)
    This is a great adventure of one American who tries to make a difference by establishing schools in the most remote areas of Pakistan. Greg Mortenson exhibits determination, vision, hard work, stamina and obviously a little luck to survive many great challenges. I do not believe anybody can read this book and not feel a little differently towards the remote people of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Mortenson arguably has accomplished more through books, schools & good will than the NATO forces have with guns, soldiers, bombs and threats. Good read!
  • (4/5)
    When the book started with Greg stuck on K2 gasping for air, I knew it was going to be good!
    Loved it!
  • (4/5)
    A very moving story, sometimes charity doesn't start at home.
  • (5/5)
    It's been a long time since a book has so powerfully touched me, and this book is probably the first that's made me want to give all of my money away. Greg Mortenson's efforts to help the children of Afghanistan are astounding, and I only wish that more people were aware of what he's trying to do.
  • (2/5)
    I have to think on this one for a while because the story of what Mortensen has done and accomplished is a separate story from a review for the book as written by David Oliver Relin.
  • (5/5)
    It's been a long time since a book has so powerfully touched me, and this book is probably the first that's made me want to give all of my money away. Greg Mortenson's efforts to help the children of Afghanistan are astounding, and I only wish that more people were aware of what he's trying to do.
  • (5/5)
    After failing a mountain climbing expedition in Pakistan, Greg Mortenson is cared for by a group of villagers in a remote corner of the country. While at the village, Mortenson sees the local children struggling to attend classes outdoors, in the cold, with no supplies. In gratitude for all they have done for him, Mortenson pledges to return to the village and build a school. After seeing the poverty of rural Pakistan, however, Mortenson is determined to do more, risking danger and death to educate all children- a mission that grows more critical and controversial after 9/11.Quote: “Haji Ali taught me to share three cups of tea, to slow down, and make building relationships as important as building projects. He taught me that I had more to learn from the people I work with than I could ever hope to teach them.â€?This book is both enjoyable and enlightening. It makes the case excellently that the only long-term solution to terrorism is building stable nations with educated citizens- give young people a reason to choose life over death. Mortenson chooses to aggressively wage peace, and believes that this is not only helpful to poorer nations, but is also of great benefit to the United States. A fantastic read.