Finden Sie Ihren nächsten hörbuch Favoriten

Werden Sie noch heute Mitglied und hören Sie 30 Tage lang kostenlos
Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451

Geschrieben von Kristi Hiner

Erzählt von Tim Wheeler


Fahrenheit 451

Geschrieben von Kristi Hiner

Erzählt von Tim Wheeler

Bewertungen:
4/5 (457 Bewertungen)
Länge:
3 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Mar 16, 2011
ISBN:
9781611067163
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

The CliffsNotes study guide on Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 supplements the original literary work, giving you background information about the author, an introduction to the work, a graphical character map, critical commentaries, expanded glossaries, and a comprehensive index, all for you to use as an educational tool that will allow you to better understand the work. This study guide was written with the assumption that you have read Fahrenheit 451. Reading a literary work doesn't mean that you immediately grasp the major themes and devices used by the author; this study guide will help supplement your reading to be sure you get all you can from Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451. CliffsNotes Review tests your comprehension of the original text and reinforces learning with questions and answers, practice projects, and more. For further information on Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451, check out the CliffsNotes Resource Center at www.cliffsnotes.com.

IN THIS AUDIOBOOK

• Learn about the Life and Background of Ray Bradbury
• Hear an Introduction to Fahrenheit 451
• Explore themes, character development, and recurring images in the Critical Commentaries
• Learn new words from the Glossary at the end of each Chapter
• Examine in-depth Character Analyses
• Acquire an understanding of Paradise Fahrenheit 451 with Critical Essays
• Reinforce what you learn to further your study online at www.cliffsnotes.com
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Mar 16, 2011
ISBN:
9781611067163
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Kristi Hiner is an English teacher at Wooster High School in Wooster, Ohio, where she also serves as the school newspaper advisor.


Ähnlich wie Fahrenheit 451

Ähnliche Hörbücher
Ähnliche Artikel

Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Fahrenheit 451 denken

4.1
457 Bewertungen / 420 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    Guy Montag is a fireman, but rather than extinguishing fires and saving lives, he burns the possessions of people who own and read outlawed books. Sparking up a conversation with his new neighbour, Clarissa, a young lady who has a liberal and refreshing approach to life makes him start to rethink how he is and what he want from life. After talking to her one evening, he returns home to find that his wife has overdosed on pills. Thankfully she survives, and he continues his conversations with Clarissa, until one day she isn’t there. A few days later he is helping his squad ransack a house prior to burning, he steals a book. The woman whose house it is, refuses to leave and sets fire to it with herself inside. Shocked and saddened he tries to talk to his wife Mildred about it, but it dawns on him that he has almost nothing in common or to talk about to her. As he struggles to get to sleep, he hears ‘The Hound’ outside, a robotic dog that seeks books out. Fraught with worry he takes the next day off sick. He is visited by his boss who explains how they reached this situation where books are outlawed and burnt. After he leaves Guy confesses that he has collected a stash of books, and secreted them in the home.

    They decide to look at the books, and if they have no value, then they will incinerate them. As they look at them they hear the hound return, carrying on when the creature goes away. Montag contacts an old English professor, and persuades him to help him. At home Mildred has some friends round, he tries to talk to them about the society that they are living in and the constant war that seems to be taking place, but they are not interested. He grabs a book of poetry and reads it to them, flustering them. Faber, through the communication device, tell him to incinerate it. Back at work he hands in the book he stole, and it is incinerated. Suddenly there is another call, and head off in the truck to Montag’s home. Montag is forced to destroy his own home, but realises that he cannot do this anymore and flees to the countryside

    Whilst this feels a little dated now, the message that it conveys is still important. The society that Montag inhabits, finds free thinking and creativity abhorrent, and any possible resistance to this ideal is dealt with brutally and quickly. The plot too is a tried and tested one, the main character has a slow dawning that all is not as it seems and after considering his new perspective decides that his society is fundamentally wrong, and starts to swim back against the flow. I can see that when this was written the image of books being burnt was horrific, and even more so that this was carried out by the authorities. This challenge to the freedom to read and think about what you want is still something that people feel strongly about. Not as terrifying as other classic dystopian novels, such as 1984, but good nonetheless.
  • (3/5)
    541 Fahrenheit Ray Bradbury (1953)

    It had been written that this book stands alongside such books as "1984" (1949) and "The Brave New World" (1932).

    I could not disagree more with that statement. In my opinion this book doesn't compare to those novels even slightly in the significant impact felt upon completion of novel. This book left me disappointed.

    "It was a pleasure to burn."

    A world where firemen create fires instead of putting out fires. Burning books and leaving ruins of history behind. When a woman wanted to burn with her books, Montag becomes uncomfortable with his job as fireman. He begins to take books home and marvels at the contents. Ultimately, it's The Bible, that survives the carnage to his own home after his deception is uncovered. He thought he could make a copy before he was discovered.

    Montag eventually goes on the run to escape when it's discovered he's been hiding books. I appreciate the authors desire to illustrate the importance of books or rather knowledge. The story initially gained my interest with this dystopian world but finally became a bore to me and just plain disjointed. The ending was rather disappointing for me.
  • (4/5)
    The important parts of this classic are the monologues by Captain Beatty, explaining how book burning became necessary; Faber, who describes the importance of books and their significance for real happiness; and Granger, who speaks of the future that will be shaped by those who carry the contents of books, even if imperfectly.For me at least, the power of the book was diminished by Bradbury's 1979 Afterword. He expresses an idea that minorities should not work to reduce the expressions by majorities, presumably even those that call into question the right of the minorities to exist as equals, or even at all. This places him well in the camp of the conservative Republicans today who think that speakers who fulminate on the theme that whites are superior, blacks are criminals, Mexicans are rapists, Muslims are terrorists, expressing a nostalgia for the Confederacy and believing that granting women the right to vote was a first step on the road to chaos, should not be interfered with. But there comes a time when saying that gays should be executed or blacks enslaved is not a "different" idea that should be allowed expression, and then countered with more speech. It is an evil whose time has passed. So maybe I would wind up on the side of the burners, but I don't think it has to go that far. It's just so easy for comfortable majorities to think minorities should constantly defend their existence, something the majorities are never required to do.
  • (5/5)
    I read the 60th Anniversary Edition with its introduction by Neil Gaiman and its supplementary materials. Both were full of wonderful facts about the story, but I kind of wish I had skipped the intro until the end. Bradbury’s worlds exist on their own, the familiar and real infused by magic or danger, and surrounded by the darkness and woods that separate them from our civilization. I don’t want to tie them to anything other than my own memories of the past and dreams of the future. However, once the flames die down and you realize that you could not be one of the heroes to memorize the book, check out the other material for some interesting context.
  • (4/5)
    I saw the movie first in a big-screen theatre, 1966 (directed by François Truffaut, starring Julie Christie as Claisse). Recently I came across a 1971 edition of F-451, and figured it was time to read what Bradbury wrote, rather than a screenplay version. I was destined for disappointment! The storyline is amazing and I have enjoyed other of RB's novels, but the technologically-advanced society in the movie brought the story to a reality that I couldn't grasp by just reading the book. The movie version of the story gets a 5-star rating. I admit I was perhaps unduly influenced by watching rather than reading this novel. Usually I prefer the book, but the movie deviated so much I didn't entirely recognize the characters in the written version. Caveat emptor!
  • (5/5)
    in most of the previous reviews, it seems that the readers have missed a few things. bradbury says the work is "not about censorship." He's right. When Fire Chief Beatty brings Montag to his home, the living room is lined with hundreds of books. "It is not the ownership of books that is against the law," he says. "It is the reading of them."Also, the city was not destroyed by atomic bombs. If it were, surely Montag and his walking books couldn't have survived close enought to watch the destruction, and they did. I suggest this future world has zappers (lasars/solar rays, whatever).the book is a solid classic for our time because so much of what it presents to us has come true. Clarisse says she doesn't hang around with kids because "they are mean. At school, kids are killing kids."Now THAT paragraph alone shouild send cills up anyone's back who saw Columbine, and the D.C. shootings.There's something wrong with the world protrayed in the book; the wrongness is on every page and shows with most of the people. I know a few Millies and Beattys. I don't know enough Montags or Fabers.Bradbury went futher with at least two characters -- Beatty and the girl Clarisse -- when he wrote the play and the screenplays for the story. I wish he'd add that material to the book, but it's his copyright!
  • (5/5)
    Save me a lot of time, haha. Thanks a bunch.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed the concept and I can see how different it might've been when it was first published. The writing is solid and I love how it forces readers to think how a society would be if people do not stand up for what is right and good.
  • (5/5)
    Fahrenheit 451 is Bradbury's warning of what the future could possibly hold. He saw the possibility of a society in which our lives are consumed with mindless entertainment through tv and other forms of media that books have no place in our lives. In Bradbury's future world, it actually becomes illegal to own books. If discovered, firemen, who no longer put out fires but start them, race to your home to destroy both books and homes with fire. Fahrenheit 451 is, presumably, the temperature at which paper will catch fire and burn. Bradbury had incredible insight about the dangers of mindless entertainment, that prevented people from actually thinking life. Rather, we are constantly inundated with shallow information that creates a numb, non-thinking society. Although written about 65 years ago, I found it incredibly relevant in today's culture, with not only reality tv (and most everything else on television), but also social media and smart phones. The book is pretty easy to read after you get oriented to what's going on, and it's a real page-turner. Although the book is pretty brief, the character development of the lead character, Guy Montag, (and a couple others) is pretty fascinating. Highly recommended book that is both entertaining and thought-provoking.
  • (5/5)
    This book has, without a doubt, the most twisted plot I’ve ever read about. Not twisted, exactly – more like ironic – it’s a book about burning books. It’s a book about one lone man’s struggle towards happiness, and the discovery that he is not alone after all. It’s about the true meaning of a book, and why people would fight to the death to preserve their fragile existence.

    I loved – love – Fahrenheit 451. Its name is so symbolic and so self-explanatory – 451°F or 232.778°C is when paper burns, and since this book is about people burning book, I think I’ll leave you to figure the connection out. The style in which it is written is so dramatic – the use of short sentences and quick scenery changes only serve to accentuate the action and confusion the Guy Montag was feeling throughout the whole book.



    Montag’s life would have been so much better without Mildred. Never mind that she interacts with her ‘family’ in her ‘parlour’ the whole day whilst he is out there earning money to pay the bills. Never mind that he was the one who called the doctors when she overdosed on sleeping pills, the one who worried about her as she lay there, unmoving. Never mind that all he ever asks of her is to read a book with him. She still turns him in – her own husband - when she decides, for some reason, that he isn’t good enough for her and she had put up with his nonsense long enough. Oh no, she just literally drives off into the sunset without so much as a ‘goodbye’ to the man who ensured she didn’t have to lift a finger in her everyday life.

    When I first started reading this book – or rather, when I added it to my ‘to-read’ list, I expected it to be a sci-fi dystopian novel – no more, no less – but it became so much more. It became a question on what made us happy. It became a question on why I read. It became a question on my life – do I notice the tiniest details of life like Clarisse does, or do I just blunder my way through, noting nothing but what is required of me? Am I full of zeal for life, or am I just simply tired of it to the point I will bait someone to kill me, like Beatty?

    This book made me ponder all these things. I’ve probably scared you off now, haven’t I, with all this talk of philosophy? You probably are just scrolling through the reviews to see if you should give the book a shot, or to see whether you should continue reading the book, and I’ll bet that you’re thinking to yourself: it sounds like a deep, philosophical book and I don’t want that – I merely wanted something to pass my time with!

    Well, what can I say to soothe your fears? I won’t say that all your fears are for naught, because they aren’t – this book does get you thinking about a lot of things your previously took for granted – but I’ll say that after finishing this book, I felt that it’s worth its weight in gold. This is a book that I don’t regret spending my time reading, a book that I have no doubt I will enjoy equally, if not more ten, fifteen, even twenty years into the future.
  • (5/5)
    Guy Montag's life is very simple. He works as a fireman, burning books to preserve society. He comes home to his wife, Mildred, every night. And he never really thinks much about his life. Until he meets Clarisse whose questions suddenly have Montag thinking, which is always a dangerous proposition.As a classic, this novel has been sitting on the TBR list for ages but I was finally motivated to pick it up by the Vlogbrother's book club (check out John and Hank's views, although be warned there are spoilers for the first section of the novel). The novel itself is fascinating and terrifying in its image of the future but it is the thoughts on humanity and ideas that are truly the most beautiful part of the work. The characters themselves never reach any significant depth, not even Montag, but Bradbury uses the characters as vehicles for his amazing prose which is thoroughly haunting.
  • (3/5)
    Een boek waar ik duidelijk niet veel mee had. Toen niet en nu nog steeds niet.

  • (4/5)
    I loved it! But the end was a bit disappointing. It felt a slightly wishy washy, lots of speculation about what might be going on back in the city, what might be going on with his wife. Lots of thoughts and ideas and not a great deal of anything happening. Aside from that, it was a wonderful book.
  • (4/5)
    My son liked this book and asked me to read it. It is always interesting to read the mid-century version of the future. Somethings were spot on. Some complete misses! So I enjoyed the envisioned world and predicaments, and the first half of the book. The last half dragged a bit but once he finally burned the dog and escaped it picked back up. A book worth reading, but I didn't love it.
  • (5/5)
    I just re-read this book recently (the audiobook version read by Mr. B himself), and I have to say that Ray Bradbury is a genius. I know that this book is a classic, but it is so much more than just something that can be chalked up to "classic" status.

    He is a poet in his language. I could re-read the book again just based on the beauty of these phrases. I think this book is chillingly contemporary as well - I can't tell how many times I sat and thought of the parallels to iPods, big screen TVs, people I've heard judging their politics by presentation and looks...all the manifestations of Big Brother who is doing the greatest song and dance number on the American population that I've ever heard of. If you haven't read it lately, do. I plan on making this book part of my regular reading list.
  • (5/5)
    A weird, terrifying book. Weird because the writing is, in parts, extremely chaotic. In some parts, you just do not know what the hell is happening, and in some cases, it is never cleared up. Terrifying because it shows us a future we are actively moving towards.

    Be it the general "contentlessness" (I know no other word for it) of the entertainment in this book, the nonexistant memory of most people, the non-communication between people and the high-speed, reckless life of the youth (I sound like a disgruntled grandmother), I have no problem imagining that our society may look like that in, say, 40 years. Reading 1000 pages of a book has appearently lost its charm for many people, at least compared to watching 30 minutes of "Arrow" (a series with a weird, inconsistent storyline and mediocre characters which I have been guilty of watching the first season of) or, even worse, the Supermodel / Superstar bullshit that has infested almost all channels.

    When I sit inside a subway train and see everyone of the age of thirty or less staring at their smartphones and chatting, I can't help but feel that the age of sitting together at home for three hours, cooking something nice and talking about everything there is to talk about, has mostly passed in favour of the age of chatting all the time, without saying anything at all. Just glancing at a chat conversation, I regularily see more emojis than actual letters.

    This is made even worse by the fact that all those communication channels are, appearently, under constant surveillance. The only form of communication you can be reasonably convinced is private, is face-to-face meetings at home (which, appearently, does not happen very often anymore) or encrypted communication (which is only done by very few people, although there are, by now, messengers offering easy-to-use, encrypted chats).

    All in all, I came out of this book depressed. Which is good, since it is supposed to be that way.
  • (4/5)
    A picture of a horrifying future where books are abolished. A disturbing book, but a ray of hope shines through. Very thought-provoking.
  • (3/5)
    Unlike the fireman of today who put out fires for a living, the firemen of Ray Bradbury’s world in Fahrenheit 451 start them. More specifically, when their alarms go off in the middle of the night, they rush to the home of individuals who are harboring and reading books. As the books burn (at 451 degrees Fahrenheit), the owners are arrested. The reading of books is considered a threat to the greater good and is a subversion against society.Although on the surface books are targeted as the source of evil, it is not the books themselves that the government fears, but the knowledge that people can acquire from reading those books. In fact, all forms of media have been watered down and controlled in an effort to keep the people at peace and without worry or fear. All to the extreme. The society in Bradbury’s world values conformity and to be different, an individual, is considered dangerous.Guy Montag is a fireman, one who has enjoyed his job for many years, but suddenly he finds himself in doubt. It begins with a girl, “I’m seventeen and I’m crazy” Clarisse McClellan, who he meets one night on his walk home. Clarisse is a curious girl whose questions make Montag question his own life, his own happiness. What Montag finds disturbs him. And from there, his life as he knows it begins to unravel and change. He doubts everything he once valued and held dear; and with these thoughts, he knows that nothing can ever be the same.It is Clarisse, a horrific tragedy at the house of an older woman whose books must be burnt, and the memories of an elderly professor in a park, that spur Guy Montag into action. He seeks out the old professor, hoping to find answers to his questions. In a world where asking questions and seeking the answers can be fatal, Montag places himself in a very dangerous position.Fahrenheit 451 is a powerful novel that forces readers to face the extreme of where censorship of not only books, but especially of thought and knowledge, can lead if unchecked. And yet it is also a novel of hope, of the possibility for change, if only a person is willing to remember and learn.I came away from this novel feeling a little ashamed at my recent thoughts of wanting to keep the world out and only focus on my own life. The stressors of watching and reading the news and keeping those events at arms length, seemed less stressful, less worrisome. It’s easier not to think of that which we can’t control—a way to avoid the fear and worry that can creep in. While these thoughts of mine come and go and are not to the extreme preached about in the novel, it’s a thought worth pondering all the same.Favorite Parts: I really enjoyed the moments with Clarisse McClellan. Her curiosity and openness, however simple it may have seemed at the time, helped spark Guy Montag into taking a closer look at his life and society around him.Beatty was an interesting character who made me grateful my copy of the novel included an afterward by the author which explained some of the character’s past. Beatty, although spouting the company line all the while, intrigued me. His knowledge of history and literature seemed counter to the denial and ignorance that society was encouraged to live in.Note about the Author: Ray Bradbury spent most of his time writing the first draft of Fahrenheit 451 in the basement of the UCLA library, typing away on a typewriter that cost him a dime every half hour. He said that in all, it cost him nine dollars and eighty cents in dimes to complete that first draft.
  • (4/5)
    a favorite.
  • (3/5)
    The idea is wonderful. The characters are interesting. The ending is dissatisfying.
  • (4/5)
    After a slow beginning, a very nice read.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent story and easy to follow. Much much better than the movie. Thought provoking.
  • (5/5)
    I didn't like it until the very end, but then I loved it. Deep, huh?
  • (5/5)
    Sci-fi Classic novel of censorship and defiance in an insane world. Books were for burning along with the houses that hid them. Guy Montag was a fireman and his job was to start the fires. The book was frightening to me as my house is full of books and would definitely be burned if that were the law today! Scary thing is that offensive ideas are still being protested today instead of allowing others to have their own beliefs. Recommended!
  • (5/5)
    Scary vision of the future
  • (4/5)
    There's a reason classics are classics. That said, and although there isn't really any excess in the book, I felt that ultimately Bradbury let the story lead him too far, and some revision would not have been amiss. I quite appreciated the way the story is written to feel futuristic without much concrete description - and at the same time, 1950s norms are glaringly evident to a modern reader!
  • (5/5)
    In the year 2016, Stephen Johnson, a 23 year old fireman in Perth, Western Australia, was charged with starting three separate fires deliberately. There was another case in 2009. Firemen are supposed to put fires out, not start them, aren’t they? Imagine an alternative world where that isn’t true, where the fireman’s mission is to wield the flame-thrower of state oppression. What then is the state most scared of?The success of Fahrenheit 451 is, I think, down to a very simple connection the author makes with the audience: Knowledge is better than ignorance, so we don’t burn books, do we? Imagine a society where they did and how shallow would that be. ‘We don’t burn books’ means any books, even gormless examples. I think the story has more gravity because it is set in the USA, a country which protects free speech to the extent that its citizens are allowed to say anything they like, no matter how abusive or unreliable. The principle’s the important thing, that it should protect everything we hand across generations, so what is known can never become smaller and what has enriched the heart can uplift and inspire new hearts. We instinctively feel that protecting the side of reason and higher emotion (thought, learning, art) is the right movement to be in, the side with real worth. Let’s feel warmth from that glow and keep it coming please. Championing this helps us to believe humans are noble creatures, can rise from the floor and create a fertility of value around them. If an alien ship landed, we’d expect them to be impressed by something as simple and yet as complex as one of our libraries. Culture is magnificence. Intelligence is cool. Burning books is regressing to ditch-shit. We feel it.What about people who don’t feel it? We feel sorry for them and realise it’s probably a cry for help, that we should address their resentment, jealously, illiteracy and the social reasons why they have become the ‘have nots’. Turning away from books is a failure of society. If educational dysfunction ever produced the majority of a population, that would go very badly for the ‘haves’, so there is a threat implied. What would happen then if a society became so daytime-television pathetic that the brainwashed public stopped learning? Not replacing their thinking with different thinking but instead turning down the dial on thinking altogether and blocking the sources that intellect reaches to? This could happen, incidentally, if AI did all the work and the main incentive for learning ended. Would the population then begin to resent self-improvers? Probably not, but it is not impossible.The author then adds the vibe that (like Orwell’s 1984, V for Vendetta and Reading Lolita in Tehran) an authoritarian state has institutionalised ignorance because knowledgeable and informed citizens who reach conclusions alone are potentially very dangerous to one’s mighty aegis. Therefore, ban the books. Also echoing Orwell, the state in this story keeps its subjects occupied by continually being at war with someone, anyone, every year. If you think of the first country that springs to mind, that has been fighting someone almost every year since it was founded, does that sound familiar?Closing schools, turning academics out into the fields, confiscating property and propagating conflict as an excuse to arm your enforcers, using martial law and to conflate non-conformism with helping the adversary – burning books – has happened for at least a few years in all of these places: Cambodia, Vietnam, Germany, Myanmar and Russia. Some of them have retained aspects of fine culture (approved composers, the national ballet) but only did this to demonstrate to the world a lingering sense of superiority, ignoring the twist that everything elevated they celebrated had been created under a quite different system.This is also the journey of a man from ignorance. He starts metaphorically huddled around a fire in the darkness and, through self-realisation, takes fumbling steps toward the light, comprehending its value and rejecting his indoctrinated past, seeing what the worthless ideology has done to him and seeking salvation in a higher cause. The redemption angle has been done many times before but this is strong stuff, so rewarding and ultimately an elemental force of pro-literacy. At the end, he doesn’t need to be a professor to be valued by itinerant professors as being the right-thinking sort makes us equals in our struggle against density. The fireman just needs to be on the right side; and so do we. Giving this book a high star rating in a review is like voting, publically announcing that you cherish reason. Anyone who gives it a one star rating should probably be checked on occasionally as it’s only a matter of time before the TV breaks, monotony wins, their eyes cross and they fuck the cat.
  • (4/5)
    As Karen noted, the contemporary reader knows the narrative. There are no surprises, yet I found it sublime.
  • (4/5)
    The premise of Ray Bradbury's short novel Fahrenheit 451 is well known: its a story about a future time in which firemen no longer put out fires, but instead are employed burning books, which have become illegal due to their depressing tone and contradictory ideas. But there is more to it than that. In this dystopia, people get a constant barrage of news and entertainment through "seashells" that fit into their ears. Furthermore, house walls are equipped with devices that project constant cheery soap operas, and viewers can even become part of the story. In this entertainment-saturated world, fireman Montag meets first a mysterious girl, and later an outlaw English professor, who help him realize the of value of the "depressing" ideas books hold. Fahrenheit 451 has earned its status as an classic piece of dystopian fiction. I think it is less about book burning per se than it is about living in a shallow world that is allergic to reflection and obsessed with entertainment. Kind of like our current age.
  • (5/5)
    Hard to believe I’ve never read this classic before. The book opens to make the reader question what he or she is reading. It has a crazed, abstract poetry to it. Gradually, it dawns the story is about much more than is seemingly on the page, questioning the meaning of books, the attention span of society, of works  shortened, condensed into snippets, even of politics, censorship and, ultimately, war. The book feels timeless yet never more timely than now, speaking of people turning from books to technology. This story is visionary. Clarisse McClellan: ‘She didn’t want to know how a thing was done but why.’ Fantastic line. Even better ones: ‘If you don’t want a man unhappy politically, don’t give him two sides to a question to worry him; give him one. Better yet, give him none.’ This on a page well worth reading alone. A subliminal work perhaps, certainly supreme. Some say works of fiction aren’t real but no fictional work can get more real than this.