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Transparent Things

Transparent Things

Geschrieben von Vladimir Nabokov

Erzählt von Christopher Lane


Transparent Things

Geschrieben von Vladimir Nabokov

Erzählt von Christopher Lane

Bewertungen:
4/5 (13 Bewertungen)
Länge:
3 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Oct 20, 2011
ISBN:
9781441873507
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

"Transparent Things revolves around four visits of the hero - sullen, gawky Hugh Person - to Switzerland. . . . As a young publisher, Hugh is sent to interview R., falls in love with Armande on the way, wrests her, after multiple humiliations, from a grinning Scandinavian and returns to New York with his bride. . . . Eight years later - following a murder, a period of madness and brief imprisonment - Hugh makes a lone sentimental journey to wheedle out his past. . . . The several strands of dream, memory, and time [are] set off against the literary theorizing of R. and, more centrally, against the world of observable objects." - Martin Amis

One of the twentieth century's master prose stylists, Vladimir Nabokov was born in St. Petersburg in 1899. He studied French and Russian literature at Trinity College, Cambridge, then lived in Berlin and Paris, where he launched a brilliant literary career. In 1940 he moved to the United States, and achieved renown as a novelist, poet, critic, and translator. He taught literature at Wellesley, Stanford, Cornell, and Harvard. In 1961 he moved to Montreux, Switzerland, where he died in 1977.

"Nabokov writes prose the only way it should be written, that is, ecstatically." - John Updike
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Oct 20, 2011
ISBN:
9781441873507
Format:
Hörbuch


Über den Autor

Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977) es uno de los más extraordinarios escritores del siglo XX. En Anagrama se le ha dedicado una «Biblioteca Nabokov» que recoge una amplísima muestra de su talento narrativo. En «Compactos» se han publicado los siguientes títulos: Mashenka, Rey, Dama, Valet, La defensa, El ojo, Risa en la oscuridad, Desesperación, El hechicero, La verdadera vida de Sebastian Knight, Lolita, Pnin, Pálido fuego, Habla, memoria y Ada o el ardor; La dádiva, Cosas transparentes, Una belleza rusa, El original de Laura y Gloria pueden encontrarse en «Panorama de narrativas», mientras que sus Cuentos completos están incluidos en la colección «Compendium». Opiniones contundentes, por su parte, ha aparecido en «Argumentos».

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Was die anderen über Transparent Things denken

4.1
13 Bewertungen / 7 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    The dull rainbow of a fog-dogged moon
    ..."he grunted and sighed in his sleep, dreaming of large unwieldy blocks of blackness"...
    I suppose it goes without saying that Nabokov's prose is brilliantly inventive, full of vivid turns of phrase and dark humour, but how does the book stack up as a whole? Well, Transparent Things is a novella about the life and memories of a seemingly average man. Hugh Person is his name, and this is the snapshot story of his stand-out moments which (as the short chapters reveal) are both strange and familiar, humdrum and disastrous.
    Transparent Things is a subtle book: the way Nabokov shows Hugh Person is surreal and sublime, yet also mundane and melancholic. All in all Transparent Things is an elegant work - a masterclass in the art of long short-story writing: understated, wistful, perceptive, deft, elusive and engaging -: definitely worth reading for the imaginative writing.
  • (4/5)
    The hero of "Transparent Things" is an editor for a publishing company. He travels to a town in Switzerland to meet with an author, and there becomes involved with a woman who becomes his wife. It is a very short, seemingly simple, story (104 pages), yet Nabokov manages to reveal layer upon layer of complexity in the telling of Hugh Person's love/life story. I know a book has something special when I begin reading again from the first page a second after finishing the last. Nabokov caught me off guard here. I usually am irritated by his erudite, yet disdainful playing with the reader. Maybe I am just getting used to his style...?
  • (2/5)
    summer-2013, fraudio, published-1972, satire, switzerlandRead on August 13, 2013Transparent ThingsFraudio> rosado> Read by Christopher Lane.pub 1972summer 2013tbr busting 2013short story (105 pages)> murder and madnesstongue in cheeksleazy> paedophillic undertones againfrom wiki: This short novel tells the story of Hugh Person, a young American editor, and the memory of his four trips to a small village in Switzerland over the course of nearly two decades.Hugh Person is a Who? person, another dislikeable character that flooded in from the Nabokovian nib. Fantastic use of language showpieced in put-downs and acrid observations.5* Pale Fire4* Sebastian Knight3* Lolita3* The Eye2* Transparent Things4 likes
  • (4/5)
    When Nabokov plays with words, the rest of us benefit for it. Short, but thick. Go through it multiple times, to (1) savor Nabokov's masterly use of language and (2) find out what on earth is going on here.
  • (4/5)
    While with some authors one might get away with less than full attention, with Nabokov it's almost like a prerequisite for the reader to have a single-minded concentration, lest you miss his train of thought or his unique way of expression. Almost always it's like intellectual exercise. This book's title, "Transparent Things", does mean just that at first, as the author focuses on the history of some random "objects" in the story, but Nabokov doesn't stop there: his protagonist and those around him become "transparent" too - no less would be expected of him. The book starts on a rather lugubrious note, and with some dark sarcasm the author does lighten it up in the middle, but all in all, it's a life of agony on display. This one was a bit too heavy for me.
  • (4/5)
    It is one of the last novels written by Nabokov. The novel is the antithesis of the title- nothing is transparent, self explanatory, clear or simple. The motivation guiding people is equally mysterious to an individual as it is to others judging his behaviour. The mystery of being or not being is profoundly locked and closed to our understanding.The plot is relatively simple. We accompany Hugh Person, an editor of an American publishing house, during his four consecutive visits to Switzerland. The style is typical for Nabokov, and typical to many modern East European writers: philosophising, aphoristic, poetic and at the same time self mocking and ironic. Since I am reading Milan Kundera at the same time, I see an uncanny similarity between the two in both style and narration technique. Another writer that comes immediately to mind with a very similar technique is Stanislaw Lem.
  • (5/5)
    For me, this slender volume is notable much more for its virtuoso display of Nabokov's magnificent literary style than for its particular story. From the back-cover description by Martin Amis, "Transparent Things revolves around four visits of the hero - sullen gawky Hugh Person - to Switzerland . . . [who later] makes a lone sentimental journey to wheedle out his past... [through] several strands of dream, memory and time."The overall story floats in and out, in non-linear sequence, in imagination and in reality, and in the past, present and future, including even the afterlife. In fact, being Nabokov's next to last novel, it briefly collects and develops ideas of the afterlife that have flitted through previous novels, and have been of interest to him ever since the simple religious beliefs of his mother that he described in Speak Memory.A chapter from the hereafter(!) describes how the effects of an unknowable and unprovable afterlife might nevertheless surround us, completely unnoticed, during our entire lives and how they just might influence events in the here and now, even though certainly never determining the course or outcome of any event.It is an intriguing philosophical speculation that Nabokov puts to the reader. But, more to the point, we finally see (but only after rereading and rethinking, of course!) how cleanly he has woven the speculation into his story and how, indeed, it finally does affect the outcome. It is as transparent as clear glass that one can finally see only by looking at it.