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American Appetites

American Appetites

Geschrieben von Joyce Carol Oates und Nick Olcott

Erzählt von Keith Carradine, Anna Gunn und Full Cast


American Appetites

Geschrieben von Joyce Carol Oates und Nick Olcott

Erzählt von Keith Carradine, Anna Gunn und Full Cast

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (4 Bewertungen)
Länge:
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
Jul 25, 2009
ISBN:
9781580816052
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

L.A. Theatre Works presents the exclusive dramatization of Joyce Carol Oates’ best-selling novel. In American Appetites, the façade of an affluent suburban couple crumbles under the weight of tragedy and scandal. When Ian McCullough accidentally pushes his wife through a plate glass window during an argument, the American dream turns into a nightmare. A sophisticated, witty and chilling tale.

An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring Lisa Akey, Keith Carradine, Alastair Duncan, Paul Eiding, Anna Gunn, Dan Lauria, Jean Louisa Kelly, Frank Muller, B.J. Ward, Elizabeth Ward Land, Liza Weil and Tegan West.
Freigegeben:
Jul 25, 2009
ISBN:
9781580816052
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch


Über den Autor

Joyce Carol Oates is a recipient of the National Medal of Humanities, the National Book Critics Circle Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award, the National Book Award, and the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction, and has been several times nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. She has written some of the most enduring fiction of our time, including the national bestsellers We Were the Mulvaneys, Blonde, which was nominated for the National Book Award, and the New York Times bestseller The Falls, which won the 2005 Prix Femina. Her most recent novel is A Book of American Martyrs. She is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University and has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters since 1978.

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Rezensionen

Was die anderen über American Appetites denken

3.3
4 Bewertungen / 3 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    A well-to-do couple in an upper-middle class neighborhood live both literally and figuratively in a glass house. Although they appear happy on the surface, they have their appetites and their secrets. One night, their marital politeness explodes into a physical fight that ends with a fatal accident. Or did it end in murder? Excellent.
  • (1/5)
    I am not having a successful audio reading time on Scribd these days, but at least this one was short. Fortunately, Mary Trump's book is eminently readable, and *Mrs. Dalloway* and Juliet Stephen's interpretation were perfect!
  • (4/5)
    Taken from my comments elsewhere on this site -- I reread Oates' novel American Appetites (1989) yesterday. I picked it up because, on a quick flip, I was tickled to realize that a significant part of the storyline relates to a shady Egyptian boyfriend, Fermi Sabri, who's suspected of abducting and/or killing his American girlfriend. I never really noticed that the first time I read this, several years ago. And so, since the representation of Arab and Muslim characters in literature interests me nowadays, I decided to reread this book. (Can anybody think of any other Oates story that features an Arab or Muslim character...?)Anyway. The words that kept coming to mind as I read were 'impulsive' and 'displacement'. Those also seem, to me, like the kind of descriptors Oates might have been going for in terms of the 'American appetite' overall. There's a thoughtless, almost careless impulsiveness to the way that characters make significant personal decisions (to begin an affair, for instance). Most of Oates' main characters here are, as in many of her books, among the intellectual and economic elite. The men work think-tanky jobs; the women maintain themselves and their homes and write cookbooks. The cushion of money and social capital makes their lives seem almost buffet-like... and yet most of them seem bored and dissatisfied. So they impulsively sample whatever seems exciting (or is 'supposed' to be exciting) and/or obsess over whether others are doing the same, typically in a very passive aggressive way. Connected to the impulsiveness and suspicion and passive aggression are the male characters' constant displacements of their emotions: fears, neediness, anger. I felt like displacements really drove the plot. It also seemed like, when things fell apart, the (white, well-off) male characters tended to focus their suspicions on either 1) the dark outsider (the Egyptian Fermi Sabri), or 2) the infidelities of their women. Along those lines, because he's Not Really Guilty, and unwilling or unable to defend himself by admitting personal responsibility or vulnerability, the (white wealthy male) main character Ian loses control of his life and gets sucked into a media circus. For a while, he has no handle on the way he's portrayed to others. As a figure of suspicion, he can't 'represent himself' anymore, either socially or in court. In fact, in an interesting twist that I noticed on this second reading, he winds up effectively taking the place of Fermi Sabri by the end (both in the courtroom and in a relationship). It's another displacement, and one that Ian barely survives... by the end, it's not clear if he even wants to. Not my favorite novel by Oates, but somewhat suspenseful and easy to read. For a more compact piece along these lines, you might want to try her shorter novel 'Cybele.'