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What Now?

What Now?

Geschrieben von Ann Patchett

Erzählt von Ann Patchett


What Now?

Geschrieben von Ann Patchett

Erzählt von Ann Patchett

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (32 Bewertungen)
Länge:
54 Minuten
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 15, 2008
ISBN:
9780061632341
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

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Auch als verfügbar...

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Beschreibung

Based on her lauded commencement address at Sarah Lawrence College, this stirring essay by bestselling author Ann Patchett offers hope and inspiration for anyone at a crossroads, whether graduating, changing careers, or transitioning from one life stage to another. With wit and candor, Patchett tells her own story of attending college, graduating, and struggling with the inevitable question, What now?

From student to line cook to teacher to waitress and eventually to award-winning author, Patchett's own life has taken many twists and turns that make her exploration genuine and resonant. As Patchett writes, "'What now?' represents our excitement and our future, the very vitality of life." She highlights the possibilities the unknown offers and reminds us that there is as much joy in the journey as there is in reaching the destination.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 15, 2008
ISBN:
9780061632341
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

ANN PATCHETT is the author of eight novels: The Patron Saint of Liars, Taft, The Magician’s Assistant, Bel Canto, Run, State of Wonder, Commonwealth, and The Dutch House as well as three books of nonfiction: Truth & Beauty, about her friendship with the writer Lucy Grealy, What Now? an expansion of her graduation address at Sarah Lawrence College, and This is the Story of a Happy Marriage, a collection of essays examining the theme of commitment.


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Was die anderen über What Now? denken

4.4
32 Bewertungen / 10 Rezensionen
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Kritische Rezensionen

  • Graduates have always been asking themselves "what now?," as the title of author Ann Patchett's acclaimed 2009 commencement address suggests. But perhaps never so much as this summer, during these strange pandemic times, when graduation ceremonies are happening in driveways, not stadiums, and the state of the job market is more anxiety-inducing than final exams ever were. The author of "The Dutch House" and "Bel Canto" offers solace and inspiration for grads (and anyone at a crossroads, unsure of what lies ahead): "Sometimes not having any idea where we're going works out better than we could possibly have imagined."

    Scribd Editors

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    I have read none of Ms. Patchett's other writings nor heard her speech. The direct personal message she offers here should resonate with certain personalities ready to hear her, or may simply lodge in their memories for later contemplation. I like who this author presents as a person. She identifies a type who is willing to wait and who responds to messages from others, but with an underlying drift of her own commitment to the dream of being an author. I see validation for the great number of us who labor in the field, perhaps learning how to stare into meaning. I look forward to meeting this person again, perhaps when I read something else she has written.
  • (5/5)
    Listened in the 2 days before graduation, May 2009. Excellent story of change and growing up. What Now is always a work in progress, where the journey is the story - not the destination!
  • (5/5)
    rabck from Rhonder; a beautiful, though-provoking book. I loved the liberal use of pictures throughout the book, illustrating the "what now?" point
  • (4/5)
    I loved the postscript and am very glad that she trashed the original keynote address. This one was lovely, as are the author's books.
  • (3/5)
    A tiny, but interesting book that aims to instill an appreciation and openness to uncertainty. There are no profound prompts for introspection, just a general alleviation of anxiety for those experiencing disarray during a crisis of identity.

    The photos undermine seriousness of the writing by inundating the reader with trite, corny photos evoking feelings of misdirection and confusion.

    However, as someone who currently relates to Patchett's stories of emotional and geographic dislocation during the many quixotic passages of one's life, there is relevance for those who feel similarly.
  • (3/5)
    I believe it you had been present at the commencement address at Sarah Lawrence College on which Ann Patchett based this book, the speech would have moved you. Reading it in a book - didn't move me. That been said, I think an 11th grade (junior) student would find relief in reading that all students this age are troubled by the phrase "where are you going to college?
  • (4/5)
    Portions read by author at Southern Festival of Books, Nashville, October 2008. Worth hearing and reading.
  • (4/5)
    A simple book that takes on an important subject: how do I decide what to do with my life? With humility and wisdom, Ann Patchett reminds us that ourlives are unpredictable. That education, status, and the labels placed onus by ourselves and others only tell part of the story. The paradox that we have to figure our paths out for ourselves and yet "the truth is that we need to hear other people, all people, especially in those moments when we don't know exactly where we're going ourselves (p.35)."Based on a college commencement address, this is a great book for anyone who is searching, puzzled, stuck, disillusioned or disappointed.
  • (3/5)
    Ann Patchett gave a commencement speech at Sarah Lawrence College that was so widely regarded that it ended up as this book. I liked this part: “The secret is finding the balance between going out to get what you want and being open to the thing that actually winds up coming your way. What now is not just a panic-stricken question tossed out into a dark unknown. What now can also be our joy. It is a declaration of possibility, of promise, of chance. It acknowledges that our future is open, that we may well do more than anyone expected of us, that at every point in our development we are still striving to grow.”
  • (3/5)
    Quick read that was once a graduation speech about how if you're lucky you'll always be asking yourself throughout life "what now?"