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The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon

The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Anne Heche


The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Anne Heche

Bewertungen:
4/5 (141 Bewertungen)
Länge:
6 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Apr 1, 1999
ISBN:
9780743563390
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

What if the woods were full of them? And of course they were, the woods were full of everything you didn't like, everything you were afraid of and instinctively loathed, everything that tried to overwhelm you with nasty, no-brain panic.

The brochure promised a "moderate-to-difficult" six-mile hike on the Maine-New Hampshire branch of the Appalachian Trail, where nine-year-old Trisha McFarland was to spend Saturday with her older brother, Pete, and her recently divorced mother. When she wanders off to escape their constant bickering, then tries to catch up by attempting a shortcut through the woods, Trisha strays deeper into a wilderness full of peril and terror. Especially when night falls.

Trisha has only her wits for navigation, only her ingenuity as a defense against the elements, only her courage and faith to withstand her mounting fear. For solace she tunes her Walkman to broadcasts of Boston Red Sox games and the gritty performances of her hero, number 36, relief pitcher Tom Gordon. And when her radio's reception begins to fade, Trisha imagines that Tom Gordon is with her -- her key to surviving an enemy known only by the slaughtered animals and mangled trees in its wake.

A classic story that engages our emotions at the most primal level, The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon explores our deep dread of the unknown and the extent to which faith can conquer it. It is a fairy tale grimmer than Grimm, but aglow with a girl's indomitable spirit.
Freigegeben:
Apr 1, 1999
ISBN:
9780743563390
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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3.8
141 Bewertungen / 76 Rezensionen
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  • (3/5)
    This book is about a girl who gets lost in the woods during a family hiking trip. As she struggles to survive her ordeal in the woods she draws strength both from her idol Tom Gordon and from her Walkman that allows her to listen in on her favorite Red Sox games.I was impressed by the tenacity and skill that Trisha shows surviving in the woods for as long as she does. The story does get a bit slow at points and I kept waiting for something to happen...aside from the normal disasters you would encounter wandering around in the woods. There is also a lot about baseball in here; I am not even anywhere close to being a baseball fan and many of the baseball references were lost on me.Overall an okay read. If you are interested in survival stories with a very light element of horror to them you might like this. I did enjoy some of the survival elements here and the book is a quick read. I didn?t enjoy this nearly as much as some of Stephen King?s other books though.
  • (5/5)
    Typical Stephen King suspense/horror book. I liked it.
  • (4/5)
    Not as exciting as the other books I've read by Stephen King. This one is a very mild read, and the creepy, scary bit might not be so creepy depending on how you interpret it. If you want a fast, easy Stephen King book that won't give you nightmares, this is a great pick, but if you are looking for the thrill of his darker work, this one may be very dull. I enjoyed the wilderness survival aspect of this book a lot, but the baseball references got a bit hard to follow. I'd have liked just a bit more narrative assistance to help me understand the baseball stuff as it applied to the story, cause otherwise those segments were just meaningless filler for me as someone who doesn't follow baseball and know the jargon.
  • (3/5)
    The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon is a slow book with a mixture of survival and adventure. First Looking over this I expected it to be a little more thrilling. Although this book didn't have the creepy stereotypical plot expected from Stephen King, it still gave a great sense of adventure. This book taught me a few helpful skills to help live out in the woods, but it still didn't have the detail I was looking for. This book had a fairly quick start, Trisha wonders of the trail to go to the bathroom, this is when she decided to take a shortcut, little did she know this move could kill her. Trisha didn't care what happened to her at the time, she felt like she was hated. If it wasn't for this girls huge amount of knowledge, and baseball that kept her moving she would surely be dead. By the end of the book she realizes she was loved, and that her mother would rather die herself then lose her own daughter.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this book. I am not a Stephen King fan...his books are a little too frightening for me. But this was just wonderful. I would read it again and again.
  • (4/5)
    Like all of Stephen Kings book, it was very well written. That's why he's the master. I thoroughly enjoyed the story. Right from the start you were pulling for Trisha to find her way out of the woods. The adventure she endured would have broke many of us, but the resilience of a child never ceases to amaze me. I gave this a 4 stars, if I could have, I would have said 4.5 stars.
  • (3/5)
    This novel had little dialogue and LOTS of descriptive prose. Most of the time I do not like books written this way. This book was OK, but not one of my favorite King novels.
  • (3/5)
    The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, Stephen King's Grimm fairy tale of nine-year-old Trisha lost in the woods, failed to hold my interest despite that promising premise. The story meanders rather than propels forward. Trisha's words and inner thoughts often seemed far too knowing, advanced, and smart-alecky for a child that age in such a harrowing situation. This novel contains not nearly King's usual level of horror, blood, and gore, but as assuredly this still is a nighmarish tale, he does convey some appropriate sources of terror, such as marauding, bloodsucking mosquitos; and clouds of minges and noseeums delivering outsized bites.Though not noted anywhere, I'd guess that King's inspiration for this story may have been the true-life survival adventure of twelve-year-old Donn Fendler, who in 1939 was separated from his family and was lost on Maine's Mount Katahdin until rescued nine days later (and sixteen pounds lighter).
  • (5/5)
    I loved every minute of this book! I have to admit, not being a sports person, I had no idea who Tom Gordon was. When I found out he was a ball player, I hesitated, thinking that I didn't want to read about baseball. I am so very glad that I decided to take a chance and dive in anyway and the baseball part didn't put me off in the least. I was pulled in, rooting for Trish all the way, and thanked my lucky stars that I have never come close to being lost in the woods. I'd have never made it!. The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon could be one of my favorite Stephen King books ever!
  • (3/5)
    Not terribly frightening story about a nine-year-old girl lost in the woods. Well-written and suspenseful.
  • (3/5)
    A quick read, but it really displays how well King can write from the perspective of a child.
  • (5/5)
    I think I'll give this book five stars. Because I was so scared Tricia wouldn't survive! And I was so relieved when she actually survived!

    I wonder if the wasp man and the wasp bear were hallucinations. The bear was really there, but the wasps?

    I was so glad when a hunter found her and got her to hospital. I was very relieved that he was a nice man! I worried for a bit that he wouldn't be, but he was!

    So I'm giving this book the full five stars because it was a really tense read!
  • (4/5)
    I love survival stories!!
    Absolutely LOVE them!!
    Same with sports! And same with Stephen King!! I just love them all!

    What I loved about this story is how King weaves together a survival story with sports and horror.

    We have a survival story of a little girl who gets lost in the vast forests of New England. That’s pretty damn scary on its own. But then King, with his creepy voodoo storytelling, throws in these terrifying dark images. I wasn’t even the girl lost in the woods. I’m just the reader and I was creeped TF out!

    That’s why stories like this are my favorite. Ones that take place in the wild. Whether it’s a survival story or a camping story, or a ship frozen in the Arctic Ocean. Those kind of stories are scary! Especially when you make it a horror fiction. YIKES!!!

    The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon was a short, fast paced read. It was heartbreaking reading about this poor girl, lost in the vast wilderness. With her health dwindling away from hunger and dehydration she starts to lose touch with reality. It gets intense and dark. But luckily, there is some humor in it which will help keep your spirits up when reading.

    4 stars
    I really enjoyed it. Plus, the audiobook was fantastic!
  • (3/5)
    This was the first Stephen King novel I read and I picked it because it was his shortest. I've read several since then and this isn't his best work. I didn't think that girl would ever get out of the woods.
  • (5/5)
    This book was much better than I thought it was going to be. I just couldn't imagine how good a book could be with one character alone by themselves lost in the woods, but the author managed it. I was also surprised by the amount of dialogue made by one character and a radio. The story was kept interesting with the various survival issues the main character Trisha faced, as well as a mysterious beast that stalked Trisha throughout the book.
  • (5/5)
    Definitely one of the better Kings I've read - short and sweet, just walking the line between realism and King's brand of cosmic supernatural, and plenty realistically terrifying. It kinda makes me wish I liked baseball.
  • (3/5)
    If you have already watched one chapter of Bear Grylls' Man vs. Wild, then you'll be quite familiar with this book, because it is basically Man vs. Wild with a nine year old (and too tall for her age) girl. Or, if you already took a peek on Stephen King's recent book In the Tall Grass, it basically this plus Blockade Billy, which is not necessarily bad. As usual, the experience of little Trisha are quite vivid and the way King wrote the story reminded me a bit of The Long Walk.
    I think that this book wasn't so bad, but I still missed a bit of the "real Stephen King element" in the story. You know, the psychological games, a bit more of family drama (which was going pretty nice, but was only shown in small flashes, the main focus being on Trisha's adventures in the woods). The element I was expecting to see more often, which was the scenes with Tom Gordon, could have appeared more often. I think I was hoping to see stronger bonds between Trisha and the Tom Gordon that lived in her mind. I don't know, perhaps some more interaction?

    This book definitely wasn't King's best book, but it was a very good one nevertheless.
  • (4/5)
    A terrific book. Very little use of standard King heebie-jeebies. An excellent book inside the head of a little girl lost in the woods. I really enjoyed this and read it in one sitting.
  • (4/5)
    Trisha McFarland is a nine year old who is going hiking with her mom and older brother. As the hike begins, the mom and teenage brother are busy arguing once again and Trisha who is walking behind them, decides to veer off and use the bathroom in the woods. She figures she won't be missed and she even hopes that her mom and brother might look back and be scared once they realize she's gone, since they've been paying her no mind. Once she's done using the bathroom, Trisha decides to take a shortcut through the woods, instead of going back to the trail. Within minutes, she's completely lost. Her brother and mom still haven't even realized she's not walking behind them anymore."Trisha turned back toward the slope, and then turned around again as the worst idea of her life came to her. This idea was to go forward instead of backtracking to the Kezar Notch trail. The paths had forked in a Y; she would simply walk across the gap and rejoin the main trail. Piece of cake. There was no change of getting lost, because she could hear the voices of the other hikers so clearly. There was really no chance of getting lost at all." p.21Days roll into nights and the deeper she walks into the woods, the worse it is for her. Soon enough, Trisha realizes she is not alone, something is following her. She can't see it, but she knows it's there. This 'something' is leaving dead animal carcasses and claw marks on trees. Trisha's poor sense of direction continues to lead her further and further into the deep woods.Do you know what amazes me most about this book? The fact that Stephen King can write a story about a nine year old girl being lost in the woods and turn it into a tense, creepy, page turner. I decided to re-read The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon one weekend and it was a nice dose of horror.Characterization is wonderful here as per King's usual. Trisha's parents are divorced, while in the woods she has flashbacks of her mom and dad. She wonders how she could have been sitting in her car one minute, and lost in the woods the next. You can't help but root for her and be scared for her too. King doesn't miss a beat though, Trisha hallucinates at times as the exhaustion and stress take their toll on her. As I read I could easily envision the dense woods, the sounds of birds, the fear Trisha felt.You don't really know what is following Trisha, whether it's a bear or a monster. King does a fantastic job at making you scared of something that hasn't even shown itself yet. It's simply the thought of that monster in the woods that is really scary."The unreliable moonlight had changed the shapes of the trees, had turned them into bone faces with black eyes. The sound of two branches rubbing together became the clotted croon of a monster. Trisha turned in a clumsy circle, trying to look everywhere at once, her eyes rolling in her muddy face." p.98I recommend The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon to all King fans or to anyone looking for a quick dose of horror. This one is mild compared to his other works, so if you are new to this author and are looking to read one of his books that isn't too scary, I think this is a good choice. The fear of the unknown, inner strength, courage and hope are what lies at the core of this scary story. King delivers here and I'm glad I re-read this one. King has a knack for creating young characters that the reader can root for and care about. Disclaimer:This review is my honest opinion. I did not receive any type of compensation for reading and reviewing this book. While I receive free books from publishers and authors, I am under no obligation to write a positive review. I purchased my copy of this book.
  • (3/5)
    The getting lost in the woods part is so descriptive it made me itch as I was reading it... or maybe I'm just WAAAY open to suggestion.
  • (4/5)
    This book was very suspenseful and thought provoking. The story is a psychological study of saving yourself under cruel conditions. King creates a 9 year old character who is likable, charmingly, and totally believable.. The baseball metaphor and Anne Heche's truly brilliant performance further enhance the narrative. However; there is an unexpected, ill-fitting musical interlude at the end of each "inning". Good job SK.
  • (4/5)
    This book was very suspenseful and thought provoking. Was what she saw real? Was it a bear or evil spirits? If it was the bear, why did he spare her life?
  • (4/5)
    Amazingly my stepdaughter gave me a Stephen King book, that I haven't read, for Christmas. A nine year old girl gets totally lost while hiking. Her Mom and older brother were too busy arguing too notice. We get to experience her struggles including what's going on in her head. One of her coping mechanisms is to invoke Tom Gordon, her favorite Red Sox player along for the ride. She encounters all sorts of terrain, including bogs and rocky hills. She scrounges for whatever she can find to eat and water to drink with some horrendous digestive consequences! And, oh yeah, there is that unidentified monster stalking her along the way. It is always a treat to experience the character's thoughts and join them on a familiar yet not so normal journey that Mr. King is so good at describing! You just never know where he'll take you next!
  • (4/5)
    Nine year old Trisha gets lost in the woods. But these aren't just any old woods. These are the woods of Stephen King, and of course, that means something spooky has to be in there too! And it is! But Trisha's love for the Boston Red Sox, and their closer Tom Gordon, keeps her going and going. I had fun reading this and I totally geeked out by using an actual Tom Gordon baseball card as my book mark!
  • (4/5)
    Juni 1998.Patricia "Trisha" McFarland p? 9 ?r er p? en udflugt med sin mor Quilla Andersen og sin storebror Pete McFarland. For?ldrene blev skilt for et ?r siden. Quilla har l?rt Trisha visse basale regler om hvordan man overlever p? egen h?nd i naturen og det viser sig praktisk, da Trisha g?r lidt for sig selv og forvilder sig bort fra stien. Hun bliver skr?mt af en slange, falder og mister orienteringen. Det skulle bare v?re en kort udflugt, s? hun har gummisko og nogenlunde fornuftigt t?j p?, men ikke noget af det udstyr man ville tage med p? en dagslang tur i ?demarken. Trisha er v?ldig glad for baseball og for sin far, og dem t?nker hun meget p?, mens hun f?lger en str?mmende flod nedad og ud af skoven. Desv?rre er hun ogs? hurtigt ude af det omr?de, der bliver efters?gt.Hun er ikke helt tabt bag en vogn, s? hun spiser bregner (fiddleheads) og sm?rer mudder p? myggestik og senere over det hele for at slippe for flere bid og stik. Men hun drikker ogs? af vandet i floden og f?r diarre og opkastninger som tak. Hun synes ogs? at hun bliver forfulgt af noget, m?ske en stor bj?rn. Hun finder checkerberries og beechnuts og f?r fra nu af f?lgeskab af en imagin?r Tom Gordon. Feber og lungebet?ndelse f?lger.Imens er for?ldrene ved at miste h?bet som dagene g?r uden at hun er fundet.Til sidst kommer hun ud af skovene, desv?rre med en bj?rn/uhyre/gud i h?lene. En krybskytte skr?mmer bj?rnen v?k og redder Trisha.Hun bliver genforenet med for?ldrene p? hospitalet og alt er godt.Udm?rket roman, men handlingen kan st? p? et frim?rke.
  • (2/5)
    Trish McFarland, a nine-year-old girl goes hiking with her mother and brother. While these two are engaged in conversation, Trish leaves the trail and becomes hopelessly lost in the woods. The more she tries to find her way out, the more upset and injured she becomes. Meanwhile, there?s something or someone who keeps watching her. As Trish?s physical state deteriorates, she imagines (or was it really her imagination) that Tom Gordon is giving her hints for survival.Not too much happens in The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon. Where?s the imaginative story I?ve come to expect from the author? This book was rather boring. I couldn?t wait for Trish to get out of the woods. That wasn?t from fear, but rather from the tedious story. It was neither funny nor frightening. I think the author can do better. I must add, though, that I liked the author?s postscript. As a matter of fact, I liked it better than the novel.
  • (3/5)
    That?s it exactly ? a fairy tale. I read some reviews on Amazon.com that cited the utter unbelievability of this novel and that?s right if you forget that it?s fiction. As fiction it works fairly well. Tricia is separated from her family and gets lost. She has her lunch and a bottle of soda but that?s it. She remembers from somewhere that certain things are edible and survives on those too. The water she drinks though, makes her sick and she vows to never tell anyone that when she had diarrhea she fell right over into it. The presence of the monster though it what was impressive. King has gone the way of Lovecraft in crafting this monster. We never really get to see it. We see evidence of it ? trees ripped up, disemboweled corpses of deer and the creepy, watched feeling that Trisha has sometimes. Once, she fell asleep and woke up with a circle around her that was scraped into the earth. I liked the effect.
  • (3/5)
    ?The Girl who Loved Tom Gordon? is a wonderful example of how Stephen King can take something as simple as a hike and make it every person?s own private nightmare.

    When 9 year-old Trisha goes with her mom and brother for a brief hike on the Appalachian Trail in Maine, her brief bathroom break becomes the thing of nightmares when she tries to take a shortcut off the path to get back to her mom and brother. Unfortunately for Trisha, her ?shortcut? takes her deep into the woods leaving her alone and struggling to find someone or someway to get back to her mom. Trisha is not your average young girl and she is smart enough to ration her food, find water, locate edible wild foods (such as checkerberries and fiddleheads) and to use her imagination to survive her dilemma and find a way home.

    This novel is an example of why Stephen King remains the king of the horror genre. His writing is absorbing and the details of branches snapping, claw marks and the feeling of desolation encourage his readers to live the horror of being lost in the woods with Trisha. King?s ability to get into the mind of a young girl and what scares her is incredible. His ability to realize the basic fears of every person, put them into captivating text and his normal characters with ordinary frights transcends the bounds of time and space making him an exceptional author and an American classic.
  • (4/5)
    Book on CD performed by Anne Heche

    A young girl who loves baseball (and particularly one Red Sox player) takes a few steps off the path when on a hike through the Appalachian Trail with her mother and older brother. In the blink of an eye, she is lost and trying very hard not to be terrified.

    King is a master craftsman and he is never better than when playing on all our childhood (and adult) fears, magnifying them tenfold and letting his (and our) imagination carry us away.

    I loved Trisha McFarland! She?s resilient, intelligent, and brave. She?s also young and makes some wrong decisions which get her farther into trouble. (Number one rule of being lost in the woods ? STOP moving, stay put and wait for rescue ? but if she?d followed that rule there wouldn?t be much to the novel.)

    I grew up going camping with my family. We slept out in the open (no tent), though we usually had a tarp of some kind to keep off the rain. But I don?t think I could fare half so well as young Trisha did. She remembered a science class that helped her, and lessons her mother imparted on other nature hikes helped her forage for a few berries or edible ferns.

    This is not to say that she had an easy time of it. The ?tough tootsie? voice in her head definitely shoots holes in each theory and idea Trisha has, filling her with doubt and increasing her fears. The noises and violence of nature can be frightening and shocking to anyone, let alone a nine-year-old town girl, not accustomed to such experiences. It?s easy to imagine boogie men and monsters lurking in the dark (not to mention the real dangers of snakes, poisonous plants and predators). The best thing she did, however, was keep her spirits up by relying on her beloved Tom Gordon, the Red Sox ?closer.? It was those ?conversations,? and using her Walkman to listen to the ball games, that sustained her and gave her hope and courage.

    Anne Heche did a marvelous job of performing the audio version. She knocked it out of the park! 5**** for her narration.
  • (4/5)
    Ein altes M?rchenmotiv wurde hier neu aufgelegt: Die neunj?hrige (Pa)Trisha kommt vom Waldweg ab und nachdem sie zun?chst nicht sehr beunruhigt ist, muss sie bald einsehen, dass sie sich verirrt hat und um ihr Leben k?mpft. Trishas einzige Verbindung zur Au?enwelt ist ihr kleiner Radioempf?nger, insbesondere die ?bertragungen von Baseball-Spielen geben ihr Hoffnung. Da der Autor Stephen King hei?t, ?berrascht es nicht, dass sie neben Orientierungslosigkeit und Hunger noch Schlimmeres in den W?ldern erwartet. Es ist aber kein blutr?nstiger Roman. ?ber weite Strecken passiert nicht viel Dramatisches, stattdessen verschlechtert sich langsam die Situation der Protagonistin. Das ganze ist souver?n vom Autor umgesetzt, er beschreibt glaubw?rdig die Gef?hlswelt der Hauptperson und treibt die Geschichte einem spannenden Ende entgegen.