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The Poisonwood Bible

The Poisonwood Bible

Geschrieben von Barbara Kingsolver

Erzählt von Robertson Dean


The Poisonwood Bible

Geschrieben von Barbara Kingsolver

Erzählt von Robertson Dean

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (640 Bewertungen)
Länge:
15 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
16. Mai 2017
ISBN:
9781543613308
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

The Poisonwood Bible is a story told by the wife and four daughters of Nathan Price, a fierce evangelical Baptist who takes his family and mission to the Belgian Congo in 1959. They carry with them all they believe they will need from home, but soon find that all of it—from garden seeds to Scripture—is calamitously transformed on African soil.

This tale of one family's tragic undoing and remarkable reconstruction, over the course of three decades in postcolonial Africa, is set against history's most dramatic political parables.

The Poisonwood Bible dances between the darkly comic human failings and inspiring poetic justices of our times. In a compelling exploration of religion, conscience, imperialist arrogance, and the many paths to redemption, Barbara Kingsolver has brought forth her most ambitious work ever.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
16. Mai 2017
ISBN:
9781543613308
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als ebook verfügbareBook

Über den Autor

Barbara Kingsolver is the author of ten bestselling works of fiction, including the novels Unsheltered, Flight Behavior, The Lacuna, The Poisonwood Bible, Animal Dreams, and The Bean Trees, as well as books of poetry, essays, and creative nonfiction. Her work of narrative nonfiction is the influential bestseller Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life. Kingsolver’s work has been translated into more than twenty languages and has earned literary awards and a devoted readership at home and abroad. She was awarded the National Humanities Medal, our country’s highest honor for service through the arts, as well as the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for the body of her work. She lives with her family on a farm in southern Appalachia. 


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4.5
640 Bewertungen / 319 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    My Favorite
  • (5/5)
    A great read
  • (5/5)
    Poignant & potent
  • (5/5)
    Life changing!
  • (5/5)
    First reading - don't know when; second reading - September 2008; third reading - March 2015. I love this book.
  • (4/5)
    What a sadly depressing, but poignant tale...

    The last half of the book was absolutely unnecessary and could have been condensed into a few chapters. But the first half is eerily poetic in many, many ways...
  • (5/5)
    One of my all-time favorite books. The distinct voices of each daughter and of Orleanna's intercalary chapters shape this saga of coming of age amidst culture clash, Congolese independence, and the backdrop of colonization.
  • (5/5)
    One of my Favorite Books! Just when I thought that no other book other then Cutting for Stone could transport me so fully into another culture across miles of water thankfully Barbara Kingsolver wrote this book. An epic tale of a headstrong, unbendable Reverend, his wife and four girls who take a mission assignment to Africa in 1959 when The Congo was ruled by Belgium and at the brink of upheaval. While Nathan Price, the Reverend, assumes he will be the changeable force for Christ in the Congo, it is the Congo that changes the Price Family. This book will transport your heart and mind into the beautiful and deadly Congo where you cannot survive on prayer alone. Each chapter is told by the point of view of one of the four sisters and also by their mother, Orleanna thus giving the women a distinct voice and insight into their struggles.
  • (5/5)
    Very powerful and overwhelming.
  • (4/5)
    This may be one of the most beautifully-written books out there.Kingsolver has composed a truly epic tale, the story of Nathan Price, an evangelical preacher, and the wife and four daughters he takes with him on a missionary trip to Africa in the late 1950's. Price and his family think they know what to bring with them, and what to expect, but they could not be more wrong. Kingsolver follows the family through three decades of change, tragedy, revelations, and choices, and readers are right there for the journey.Kingsolver is an author who not only writes so beautifully, but does her research as well. This is a book that will not leave you, even when you turn that final page and close the cover.
  • (5/5)
    I have read this book at least ten times over the years. One of my all time favorites. It is a great story.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing book. Powerful, poignant, poetic, historical, humorous with a plethora of moral messages interwoven in the narrative. One of those books that you'll always remember and one that should have won an array of awards.
  • (4/5)
    This book is giving me mixed emotions but I can definitely say it was well-written. If I was judging just on characterization alone I would give it a five. But I mark it down for one because I don't understand why it went on and on. It felt like the story, if there was one, should have been done about halfway through the book. And I'm not really clear on the message. I definitely felt things--sometimes poignance, sometimes anger. My anger was often a result of the characters bemoaning their situation too much...and I feel really awful saying that because their situation was awful. But still. That's how I feel. And I feel really sorry for the dad that everyone else seems to hate.
  • (5/5)
    I first read this book in high school. Much like To Kill a Mockingbird, I didn't expect to like it. Again, I was wrong. This novel by Barbara Kingsolver chronicled the lives of children throughout their growth, and their parents with incredible detail. Readers are able to develop relationships with these characters. In addition Kingsolver expresses the idea of cultural acceptance and empathy in a very unique way by completely immersing one's self and family in that culture in a time that was nowhere near ideal. Again, not a book I would share with elementary students, but one that is great for secondary students.
  • (4/5)
    The initial section of this book was really slow going for me. The impact of Africa on an American Baptist preacher's family who go as missionaries? An exploration of American culpability in the instability of African governments? A well written multi-generational tale that I found tragic and enjoyable.
  • (3/5)
    A missionary family travel to the Congo, and their story is told by the wife and four daughters. Long-winded, with the husband an unpleasant caricature, yet somehow compulsive reading.
  • (5/5)
    I learned that I can read a very long book and appreciate it. I'm still not interested in epics in general, or most trilogies, or most series - but this was important.
  • (4/5)
    A minister takes his wife and four daughters to Congo to be missionaries at a time of political upheaval in the country. He's terribly ineffective as a minister, husband, and father. The book is told in alternating voices from the female voices. The reader learns a great deal about the influence of this upon each narrator. I don't necessarily believe Kingsolver intends this to be an anti-Christian book. She makes heavy use of the Bible and Apocrypha, particularly Bel and the Dragon, throughout. Rather, I believe she is showing what happens when Christianity is presented in a Pharisaical manner and lived out in such a manner that alienates not only those who need the Gospel, whether a native of a foreign country or a member of one's own family. Kingsolver's writing, as usual, is beautiful. This book did not resonate as well with me as some of the author's other books, but I suspect it is primarily due to the setting. I think I have finally figured out why books set in Africa generally have no appeal to me. Entirely too many snakes are present!
  • (4/5)
    A very different book from her previous works. Here she mines her own childhood for material. A Baptist missionary takes his family (including a disabled child) to the Congo with some predictable (and some NOT so predictable) results. A VERY good book and great book club discussion.Update: 10June2001 Read again for a second book clubWe discussed family dynamics, representations of the "ideal" African, choicse made in desperation
  • (5/5)
    I had tried reading this many times and could not get into it. I had given up. MY coworker recommended it this time.I read all the reviews here on shelfari. I could not get into the book,so I borrowed the audio version from the library. I enjoyed this! The "reader' has a southern accent which goes along with the Price family in the story.
    This is an excellent story.It is well written. I would never have read the book,but the audio version was well worth it. I listened to 1 tape a night,there are 10 tapes.
    If you can't read the book,get the audio.It is worth your time. I cried at the end. But the author ties all the loose ends up by the end.
    Well done.
  • (5/5)
    The Poisonwood Bible, by Barbara Kingsolver, has been on my TBR pile for such a long time that I'd almost forgotten about it. It was only when I heard Maureen Corrigan reviewing Kingsolver's latest book that I felt a sudden, dire need to read the first book. And shame on me, but I have two more novels by this author that I'd picked up years ago and haven't touched. I might be a hoarder.Barbara Kingsolver's first novel is indeed riveting and thought-provoking. In 1960, Nathan Price, a Baptist minister from Georgia, takes his wife and four daughters on an ill-advised trip to The Belgian Congo, with the hope of spreading the word of Jesus. Unfortunately, Rev. Price is too arrogant to look and listen to what is going on around him. While his daughters and wife are picking up the local language and having life-changing revelations, he is stubbornly trying to baptize people who have valid reasons for fearing the idea of being dunked in the water. So much is lost in translation, and his daughters and wife know this, but can't reach a man who has become despicable and abusive.The most powerful thing about this novel, for me, was that the fear and desperation felt by Oleanna and her daughters Rachel, Leah, Adah, and Ruth May was not lost in translation. When it become obvious that they really should leave, their father refuses, so they are stuck. At this point, the story gets downright scary, and this story becomes an urgent read. I dreaded the future for all of them. They are no longer getting any outside help, they have no money, and Rev. Price is not popular. Nevertheless, their poor neighbors do what they can for them; no one wants to see them starve.This situation had to come to a head, and it did so with a tragedy; poor little Ruth May, after surviving a prolonged illness of malaria, is killed suddenly by a poison snake. I worried about Ruth May the whole time, but this turn of events was a shock. At this point, Orleanna is compelled to act drastically. She feels guilty for so much. With strength she never had before, she drags all their possessions out of their house for the neighbors to pick through, gathers her daugthers and what little she needs, and they make the long, long trek to Leopoldville on foot, where somehow, someway, they will make it out of there. None of them even glance back at Nathan Price.The Price family is never to be together again, and its members are deeply changed. Each of the three surviving daughters builds a life around what they have taken away. It is not even possible to imagine what their lives would have been, had they stayed in Georgia.The Poisonwood Bible is about so many things! The corrupt, greedy European and American powers that purposely keep African nations in debt, that set up puppet governments that they can control, and imprison anyone for speaking out against them. The arrogant missionaries and businessmen who use the Congolese people for their own purposes, and of course the appalling racism. Personally, for the Price women, the religion that was the centerpiece of their lives before looks different to them now.It's a powerful tome. My only criticism is that some parts at the end of the book seem to be longer than they should be, so that the pace felt like it was dropping from urgent to languid. However, I thought the ending, with Ruth May's voice, was very effective. This is a very important story and I'm glad that I finally read it.
  • (5/5)
    I admit, I had a difficult time getting into this book. I got through the first fifty pages or so in fits and starts, and wasn't looking forward to what I saw as slogging my way through around 500 more pages. Then, at some point, I got sucked in, and was suddenly unable to put the book down except when my eyes simply dictated rest. It snuck up on me, but now, I have to recommend it as a wonderful read, and as a beautiful story.Kingsolver's structure takes some getting used to; each chapter rotates from one female member of the Price family to another: four daughters, and their mother. Getting used to this is tricky, and at first the voices blend together a bit, but in the end each character (and their voice) is expertly conceived and drawn. For much of the book, their lives revolve around their father, a reverand who's missionary position changes all of their lives permanently. The journey covers around forty years spanning various parts of Africa, one village in particular, and some south east locations of the U.S. Scenery is expertly drawn and incorporated---it's obvious Kingsolver has done her research: geographical, religious, and historical.The tapestry drawn here is both heartbreaking and magnificent, with comedy to spare. Kingsolver's writing is elegant, and gives grace to a story raw with power. I don't see myself forgetting this book, and I imagine that it's one I'll come back to more than once. Yes, it is a journey in itself and a long work that takes some time to get through, but it is worth every moment, and I'd absolutely recommend it to all readers.
  • (5/5)
    This was a thoroughly enjoyable story. The author tells the tale through the eyes of a mother and each of her four daughters. By doing this , she reveals the character of each one and highlights the differences in their hopes and aspirations. The book describes the effect of the white race on what has happened in Africa over the last couple of centuries. Each character has a very different outcome.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this book, I could not put it down. It speaks to me as a person who has moved continents as a child, and felt the alienation of my new home, my desperate longing to return to my original home, and the disbelief when, years later I had the choice to return "home", and discovered I no longer knew where home was. Beautifully written, evocative. I would like to read more by the same author, but feel because of the history I share with this story, it was a one-off book love affair.
  • (5/5)
    I agree that this book is a must read for any serious bibliophile. For me, a refugee from a Southern Baptist upbringing, it was a road map to redemption, a pilgrim's progress to revelation. I can't imagine why it took me so long to get to this book. Although I enjoyed Kingsolver previously, it wasn't until I was halfway through Prodigal Summer that I really fell in love with her work. Halfway through Poisonwood Bible, I elevated her to literary goddess status. Her writing is lyrical, haunting, and I wonder if it falls in the category of magical realism? Her message is transformative, evolutionary, universal. In places I confess I got a little bogged down (with the dream sequences, especially), but with patience, perserverance, the book leaves the reader not only satisfied, but wiser. Ah!
  • (5/5)
    I have attempted to read this book several times, and never got beyond the first few pages. On a recent 4000 mile trip, I picked it up again, and what a wonderful book to read and reread. Race, religion, sin, politics, redemption are all woven like a tapestry in this book, and the reader comes away with a deep sense of the Congo, the politics behind that area and the mistakes people make and some overcome to become better people. Nathan Price, a fierce evangelical Baptist missionary takes his wife and 4 young daughters to the Belgian Congo. They are caught up in the Congo's fight for independence and its devastating consequences, and as the story unfolds, it is impossible to lay the book down. Told by each character, the plot never dulls until the unforgettable epic chronicles the disintegration of a family and a nation. A must read.
  • (4/5)
    A little bit slow to get going, but really worthwhile in the end. Very interesting way of telling a story through the eyes of four different people (mother and 3 daughters). Ingenious. You really have to feel for each of the characters, as you get to know their feelings and reasoning behind actions. The story feels very 'real'. Also interesting was the setting of the Congo. The excellent descriptions of the surrounds and events truly places the reader into this jungle setting. This is a book that I will always remember and will recommend to others.
  • (4/5)
    I cannot tell you how much I loved this novel. Having each of the women in the Price family narrate this novel was fantastic because each woman had their own views about what was going on. This was due to their age, their relationship to Nathan Price, and their world view when they arrived at the Congo. What made this even more amazing was that I could have told you within just a few sentences who was narrating without being told otherwise because each of the five women had such a distinctive voice. The narrator was also incredible, bringing each of these characters alive as individuals. I especially loved the way Dean Robertson, who sounded like a woman to me the entire time, took Rachel's common phrases and made them just so perfect.Of all the characters, Adah Price, the twin sister with hemiplegia was my favorite. She lived so internally because of her condition and she used her brain to play with language. That use of language wasn't just for her own amusement. It added a dimension to their lives and to the Congo that brought me there so easily.I hated Nathan Price. I feel somewhat judgmental saying that as he had no voice in the novel. Still, what he did - or more often didn't do - to and for his family while they were in the Congo so that he could answer to his calling was appalling. He may have bullied his family, but he was a weak man who hid behind the Bible.The only issue I had with The Poisonwood Bible was that it got somewhat preachy about Africa and the Western world. Although I believe those were the thoughts and feelings of the narrators, the actual story and their lives said that much more loudly than the narrator's opinions.I cannot recommend this novel more highly. If you haven't read it yet, you really should. Not only is the story rich, but the writing is excellent. You will not be disappointed.
  • (4/5)
    Full Disclosure: I love Barbara Kingsolver books, I love Africa, I love the indigenous people of Africa, I love the teachings of Jesus (the one's closer to Tata Bird's than Tata Price's interpretation). I think Kingsolver does a masterful job of creating historical fiction through the eyes of five women: a mother named Orleanna Price and her four daughters. They are dragged along in the wake of the missionary Nathan Price into the heart of the Congo as the Belgians (seemingly) give up rule to a democratically elected Congolese government. It's a story of perseverance and survival amongst the harsh conditions of Africa herself complicated by the machinations of outside governments. Loved the book, hated some of the actions of the people and governments. This book will stay with me for a long, long time.
  • (5/5)
    Reread after 10 year and listened to author on World Book club. Fantastic!