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American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.s. Military History

American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.s. Military History

Geschrieben von Chris Kyle, Scott McEwen und Jim Defelice

Erzählt von John Pruden


American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.s. Military History

Geschrieben von Chris Kyle, Scott McEwen und Jim Defelice

Erzählt von John Pruden

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (422 Bewertungen)
Länge:
10 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jan 3, 2012
ISBN:
9780062116130
Format:
Hörbuch

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Anmerkung des Herausgebers

Tense and tragic...

Navy SEAL Chris Kyle lived one hell of a life. This memoir recounts his tense, tough decade at war in the Middle East, but the true tragedy comes in 2013, when Kyle was killed by a young vet with PTSD on American soil.

Beschreibung

NOW A BLOCKBUSTER MOTION PICTURE DIRECTED BY CLINT EASTWOOD—NOMINATED FOR SIX ACADEMY AWARDS, INCLUDING BEST PICTURE

From 1999 to 2009, U.S. Navy Seal Chris Kyle recorded the most career sniper kills in United States military history. His fellow American warriors, whom he protected with deadly precision from rooftops and stealth positions during the Iraq War, called him “The Legend”; meanwhile, the enemy feared him so much they named him al-Shaitan (“the devil”) and placed a bounty on his head. Kyle, who was tragically killed in 2013, writes honestly about the pain of war—including the deaths of two close SEAL teammates—and in moving first-person passages throughout, his wife, Taya, speaks openly about the strains of war on their family, as well as on Chris. Gripping and unforgettable, Kyle’s masterful account of his extraordinary battlefield experiences ranks as one of the great war memoirs of all time.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jan 3, 2012
ISBN:
9780062116130
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

SEAL Team 3 Chief Chris Kyle (1974–2013) was awarded two Silver Stars, five Bronze Stars with Valor, and numerous other citations. Following four combat tours in Iraq, he became chief instructor for training Naval Special Warfare sniper teams. He is the author of American Gun: A History of the U.S. in Ten Firearms. A native Texan, Kyle is survived by his wife, Taya, and their two children.


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  • (5/5)
    Excellent autobiography by Chris Kyle. Gives insight into the physical and mental stress that war puts on men & women. Not only great military insight but also how it effects relationships (marriage, mother/father, etc.) I saw the movie and it was fairly accurate and matched the book pretty well. Enjoyed greatly and if you like military novels you'll love it.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed the story and I'm really in awe of our military and in particular the Seals. The training and dedication they have is amazing. I didn't find it particularly well written and would drag periodically.
  • (3/5)
    While some of the content of Chris Kyle's memoir is interesting, you can tell he is not a writer, essentially leading his co-author to make it readable. As a book, it is essentially written in choppy fragments, and, if you look up the history, it also becomes hard to rely on anything the book says to be the truth given the known lies of the author, also somewhat harming it as a text. In other words, it is simply not good as a book in general, with, in this case, a far superior movie adaptation available as well. That said, it is not without redeeming value, as there are elements about the view of the war and everything else that ring true, and the co-author did make it work as a reasonably cohesive narrative to allow a reader to gain these insights.
  • (3/5)
    Not the kind of book I'd normally read (or listen to in this case), but it was good difference in perspective for me.
  • (4/5)
    A great story for both men and women. It shows two sides of the war on terror and the strain that can be put on man by combat, and family by distance. Beyond that, and more importantly to me there is a lot of good writing surrounding the actual combat during the GWOT.
  • (5/5)
    Great book. This is not a political diatribe over whether Operation Iraqi Freedom was appropriate. Rather, it is a very personal account of a man's journey into war and his experiences. It chronicles his training through basic training and sniper school and the brash, outspoken manner of young men in their prime. It chronicles the difficulties on a mission by mission basis of fighting in Iraq against terrorists who did not fight fair, who hid among civilians, and who disguised themselves
    as innocents. It chronicles the fact that when you are at war, your mission is to protect your fellow soldiers.

    Interspersed with Kyle's tales of war are thoughts from his wife and her frustrations at Kyle's re-enlistments and his absence.
    This is a long book and it will take a commitment on your part to read through it. But it is worth reading. It has a somewhat different feel to it than the movie because Kyle's voice is much clearer here and his
    thoughts about bureaucratic foolishness and the minute to minute life on the modern battlefield are set out quite candidly. Overall, a terrific book
  • (4/5)
    This one I did a little backward. I watched the movie and just barely got around to reading the book. The book is better, in my opinion. More detail, more insight into his life and his personality. I'll admit, at first this book had me falling asleep. I attribute that to the writing style more than anything else. This is an incredible story of heroism, patriotism, and good versus evil. I enjoyed hearing about his life and experiences as well as what he went through to get to where he was.

    If you don't already know, American Sniper is an autobiography by Chris Kyle, a former SEAL who holds the record for most sniper kills and was an all-around bad-ass. I loved this book and recommend everyone to read it, if you haven't already.
  • (5/5)
    Great book, although it took me a while to be able to handle the readers fake southern accent.
  • (5/5)
    An amazing book, I highly recommend it to anyone interested in snipers or soldiers
  • (3/5)
    Good book gets a little repetitive after a while. worth a listen/read
  • (5/5)
    Amazing book such truths and harsh realities. RIP Chris and thank you for your Service.
  • (4/5)
    A great personal biography. The action picks up not until Chapter 7. Loved hearing the tributes and acknowledgement of those other seals and friends who died. A lot of military jargon but of course the best parts were hearing about his thoughts on being a sniper, a husband, father, friend, family member and person.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic book, well told story and I found it inspirational.
  • (5/5)
    Great book. Chris Kyle is person to look up to.
  • (5/5)
    this was a good book to read. you need to read this before you watch the movie
  • (5/5)
    Excellent. Brilliant man. Highly recommend this book. I loved it.
  • (5/5)
    This is the first book I enjoyed listening to and I could listen to hours on end!
  • (3/5)
    I remember hearing about this book at sometime in the past. I remember thinking it might be interesting to read--but apparently I didn't go out looking for a copy. I came across this one at a local book exchange.I have great respect for those who serve or have served in the military. They do a job I can't do--a job I don't want to do. They protect us and our way of life.I obviously don't know the subject well, but I thought the book did a good job explaining the training and process gone through to become a SEAL. Parts of the narrative discussing Kyle's deployments etc. were interesting and parts dragged for me. Some concepts were repeated far too many times. I also think the book did a decent job of showing how much strain deployment and other aspects of the military can put on a marriage--and even on the soldier himself.I know Kyle and his wife got married young, so I'm not sure if I can put some of her statements down to immaturity. There were times when I thought she planned to give up on the marriage. But I do also see a kind of love there as well--particularly later in the book. Yes, she gave him a sort of ultimatum, but she also was honest with him about what she and the family needed from him. She, at one point, says she sees the order as God, Family, Country where Kyle sees it as God, Country, Family. I think I tend to lean more to her ordering than his--that may be because I'm a woman and nurturing family would come before the more abstract idea of country. It may be because I am not military and though I have relatives in the military, it seems that those choosing the military might have a different mindset about country. I was sorry to read about Kyle's friends Marc and Ryan. Ryan's death especially hit me, since he'd survived his injury and seemed to have pulled his life together despite the tough stuff life had thrown at him.
  • (2/5)
    Chris Kyle is the record holding US sniper--in this book, he's hum le about it. It shows two sides of the war on terror and the strain that can be put on man by combat, and family by distance. Kyle's perspective is that of a grunt, with regard for the "head shed" only as it pertains to their tactical expertise....demonstrates the ethos of the SEAL teams. The USA needs people like that. I skipped major portions of the book because it got boring and repetitive as well as heavily tactical, again and again. I'd like to watch the movie.
  • (5/5)
    All the details and stories and action were awesome!!
  • (5/5)
    Great book. Weird to listen now that he is gone. Thank you for your service!
  • (3/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    This was an interesting read. It was a very one-sided American perspective with poor grammar in parts, and could also get boring.
    I struggled with the racism and the comment where he stated he'd like to kill everyone carrying a Qu'ran. I lack respect for people who blanket label a group of people as "evil" as it demonstrates a lack of insight.
    But this was his experience and perspective.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (4/5)
    American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History
    Since the movie got so much attention and I was hearing how "every American should see it," yet how Kyle exaggerated various stories, how it portrayed the Iraq war in too nice a light, yet how it was helpful in shedding light on PTSD. Both praised and cursed, I thought I'd read the book for myself.

    First of all, it's a pretty tame book-- perhaps even boring for a war autobiography. Kyle notes that he didn't get his 160 kills mostly by his skill, but rather by opportunities (staying alive, re-upping, and seeing plenty of targets in Iraq) and luck (being at the right place at the right time). Lone Survivor is a more interesting/intense book if are looking for adrenaline and close calls. By the end of this book, killing becomes "no big deal," and what was probably harrowing and dangerous seems pretty mundane and routine. You probably need a movie theater to make it better.

    I think the endearing aspect is that Taya Kyle writes parts of it, describing what a jerk Kyle was, how it was difficult to be married, the changes she saw in him after his deployments, and her love for him growing as he finally decided to put his family first and not re-enlist. Most books of this nature don't have the spouse's perspective, so that made it interesting. At the Oscar's last week, Taya is quoted:
    "It's not just our story; it's every veteran's story," she said. "People have been relating to it so much, as well as healing. We're hearing stories of couples who were in combat 30 and 40 years ago, who are walking away [from the film], opening a dialogue they haven't been able to open before. So, I think it's just an honor to be able to help in some way, and have it be more than just our story.""

    The book begins similarly to Lone Survivor because, like Marcus Luttrell (who Kyle later befriends), Chris Kyle was raised a Texas patriotic country boy who can simultaneously profess love for Jesus while cursing like a sailor. He was an effective cattle ranch hand and college dropout. He was initially denied Navy entry due to screws in his arm from a rodeo injury. After the Navy called him back, a recruiter lied to him to forfeit his signing bonus saying that he had to do it if he wanted to make the SEALs.

    His Hell Week and BUDs training read a lot like every other such story I've read. He broke foot in BUDs (Luttrell broke his arm in his story). He's disappointed not to see combat in Afghanistan after 9/11, but he does engage in anti-piracy activity and his platoon is called up a year later to fight in Iraq. His initial deployment seemed unremarkable, Taya notes that he returns with symptoms of PTSD. He appreciates the American well-wishers but remembers the protestors most of all, and bitterly. He makes a good point that people shouldn't protest soldiers sent to fight the battles that elected officials vote for-- protest Congress instead.

    He eventually enrolls in sniper school, but graduates about the middle of his class. He details the work he did with Polish special forces in Iraq, speaking highly of them. During the insurgency, he notes Iraqi insurgents of different stripes-- nationalists, Baathists, Al Qaeda-affiliated Islamists. He notes that they had evidence many were on drugs to "boost their courage."

    Repeatedly, Kyle puts country ahead of family as in "God, country, family." His wife continuously does not want him to redeploy, but he can't not. So long as he's healthy and his country is at war (which is now perpetually), he feels he has to go serve. It takes him over 10 years in the service to get over this. He does multiple tours before suffering any casualties among his close friends. He loses two friends close together, and it affects him deeply.

    There is not a whole lot related to leadership or management in this book. One good quote: "I had a lot of good commanders. The great ones were humble."
    He notes the tediousness of strict adherence to Rules of Engagement. How every kill in Ramadi (and he had a lot) required filling out a detailed after-action report along with other reports to confirm that the killing was justified. On one occasion an Iraqi family of a dead insurgent protested that her husbands had been carrying a Koran rather than a rifle, which gets investigated. Kyle is not complimentary of Iraqi army, writing that it was a mistake to put an Iraqi face on the war and to train them to take over in the middle of insurgency.

    He gets arrested on one homestay, a bar fight with "scruff face" who Kyle later claimed was Jesse Ventura, who is now suing Kyle's estate for $1.7 million. (Dude, just say "it couldn't have been me" and move on. The damage to your reputation is greater from the lawsuit than from Kyle's potentially mistaken claim.) Eventually, he decides he needs to be a husband and a father, that he's not irreplaceable to his family like a soldier is with a new recruit. It took him a long time to get over SEAL life and guilt over getting out, but he gets there.

    In the end, he helped start a company to train snipers, does charity work for wounded warriors, and finds a new identity apart from the old. It is a shame that he was killed by someone he was trying to help.
  • (3/5)
    An interesting, readable account of war, the best American sniper in history and the effects that this all had on him and his family. Obviously his tragic death adds poignancy to the story but it does involve the reader, well and quickly. Worth looking apbut not as good in my eyes, as Marcus Luttrells Lone Survivior.
  • (3/5)
    First background as why to why I read this book.A while ago I watched the movie Shooter starring Mark Wahlberg who is a retired and reclusive ex-sniper. Decent and enjoyable movie. A year a so ago when my wife Heather was out I was flippin' channels and enjoined the movie again part way through. Still enjoyed it. Watching the credits I noticed it was based on the book "Point of Impact" - the first of a series about the ex-sniper Bob lee Swagger. Superb book. Apart from being a wonderful and well crafted conspiracy thriller I really enjoyed the technical parts about the science and technique of sniping. So when the movie "American Sniper" came out I watched it. I was disappointed. So I read the book and in summary, disappointed.While the movie differs from the book in some small but annoying details it has been criticized as pro-war, pro Iraq, distasteful ("savages" etc.) and these traits are consistent with the book. The book has also been criticized as "simply written". The last point is arrogant . You have to be impressed by anyone who can write a 448 page book. At least I am. Simply written - for sure and accordingly a very fast read. Pro war - not a chance. No one would be convinced to serve in the military after reading this book! Chris Kyle's priorities were God, country, family - not mine - but they're his and it didn't upset me. One doesn't need to believe in a book to read it.As a chronicle of one man's personal passage through Iraq it does a good job. Where I was really disappointed is that it isn't about sniping! There's about a page talking about the equipment, probably about the same on techniques. I find the science and process of sniping fascinating and this was a big hole for me. You might be different of course.
  • (5/5)
    Chris Kyle, with 160 kills, was the highest scoring sniper in American history. Here he tells his story in anecdotal form of four tours in Iraq over 10 years before stepping down. He tells of his love of combat, his determination to serve his country, to die for others if need be, and of his various experiences. It's not a story for kumbaya, let's-give-peace-a-chance types...Kyle is a SEAL and SEALs do violence to America's enemies. Kyle had had no interest in the Iraqis, but owed allegiance only to his mates and his country. Kyle was murdered by an ex-soldier suffering from PTSD. Clint Eastwood loosely based a hit movie on the book. The popularity of the book has attracted much attention...most of it seems to hold up to scrutiny with the possible brief run-in with Jesse Ventura who successfully sued Kyle's widow for defamation over a two-page passage.
  • (5/5)
    I saw the author on Conan promoting his book. I knew I had to get this book instantly. A portion of this book goes to 2 friends who were killed and injured in war. That there should just be enough.

    What is unique about this book is how it flip flops. You get his side. Then his wife's side. You learn how the military presses, trains, then expects our soldiers to be.

    This book will bring tears to your eyes. My heart hurt for those who died, injured and list. It was an excellent read!
  • (5/5)
    I appreciate a guy who gets straight to the point and Kyle's writing is as straightforward as his sniper shots.
  • (4/5)
    After having watched the film, I wanted to hear about Chris Kyle's experiences in his own words.This book offers a pretty good idea of the hell soldiers must go through first to become SEALs, then to actually be in war. Throughout the book, Kyle's wife, Taya, includes her own perspective on various deployments and issues at home. I thought this was a nice change of pace and certainly reminded me of the sacrifices spouses and their extended families make while their soldier is at war.I very much support our Armed Forces and am politically conservative. Still, it was a little uncomfortable reading Kyle's frequent pronouncement that he liked killing. Understand, I have no sympathy for terrorists and their ilk, but it was still a little uncomfortable for me to read this. At the same time, I fully understand that we need people with mindsets like this in our military. Fact is: they're constantly in a kill-or-be-killed environment. I'd much rather it be our enemies than our own soldiers.Kyle did a pretty decent job of explaining various military acronyms and jargon, although some of the stories were unnecessary in terms of pacing. It's also not political in nature (he never mentions any politicians by name) but clearly he was irritated about some of the policies that were put in place--he just wanted (and to some degree, needed) the freedom to do the job he was sent there to do.If you enjoyed the film, you'll enjoy the book. You certainly get to know Kyle far better here than from the film.
  • (3/5)
    This book is about a sniper in the US Navy Seals. His name is Kyle and after he finished training he was stationed in colorado. In operation Iraq freedom he became a gunner in forward-deployed SEAL scout mission. His longest shot was 2100 yards and had killed a guy with a rocket launcher assulting a convoy.I like this book because it tells about in the military and being a sniper in iraq.