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Just After Sunset: Stories

Just After Sunset: Stories

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Stephen King, Jill Eikenberry und Ben Shenkman


Just After Sunset: Stories

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Stephen King, Jill Eikenberry und Ben Shenkman

Bewertungen:
4/5 (111 Bewertungen)
Länge:
14 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Nov 11, 2008
ISBN:
9780743575324
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

Who but Stephen King would turn a Port-O-San into a slimy birth canal, or a roadside honky-tonk into a place for endless love? A book salesman with a grievance might pick up a mute hitchhiker, not knowing the silent man in the passenger seat listens altogether too well. Or an exercise routine on a stationary bicycle, begun to reduce bad cholesterol, might take its rider on a captivating -- and then terrifying-journey. Set on a remote key in Florida, "The Gingerbread Girl" is a riveting tale featuring a young woman as vulnerable -- and resourceful -- as Audrey Hepburn's character in Wait Until Dark. In "Ayana", a blind girl works a miracle with a kiss and the touch of her hand. For King, the line between the living and the dead is often blurry, and the seams that hold our reality intact might tear apart at any moment. In "N", which recently broke new ground when it was adapted as a graphic digital entertainment, a psychiatric patient's irrational thinking might create an apocalyptic threat in the Maine countrysideÉor keep the world from falling victim to it.

Just After Sunset -- call it dusk, call it twilight, it's a time when human intercourse takes on an unnatural cast, when nothing is quite as it appears, when the imagination begins to reach for shadows as they dissipate to darkness and living daylight can be scared right out of you. It's the perfect time for Stephen King.
Freigegeben:
Nov 11, 2008
ISBN:
9780743575324
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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4.2
111 Bewertungen / 63 Rezensionen
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  • (3/5)
    This book is a collection of short stories by Stephen King. I am not a huge fan of short stories as I enjoy the gradual build up of plot and the character development of a novel. Many of these stories were quite good, while others were simply average. I really enjoy the way King writes so I would recommend this to any of his fans. However, I could name over a dozen other books by King that I liked much better.
  • (4/5)
    A great collection of Stephen King's shorter stories. Heaps of interesting twists, and even when you feel you can see what direction the story is taking, you usually don't know the end destination. A good, varied selection of topics too.
  • (4/5)
    Once gain Stephen King shows that he really has an uncanny knack for extricating suspense and horror from the smallest mundaneness of everyday life. Truth be told I'm a huge fan of his short story collections over and above his more well known long form writing (with the exception of the Dark tower series!) and Just After Sunset is yet another fantastic collection of scares that will keep you reading from the first page until the last.
  • (3/5)
    This is a pretty average collection for King of short stories... few if any could be made into (made for tv) movies, but overall it was an interesting collection.

    The part that shines about these short stories is that it is clear how much he really enjoys cranking out these shorter tales, and that the stories are all so very interesting for their length but would be a terrible fit for a novel, or even novella.

    Definitely worth picking up for an avid King fan, but not one to start with for a newcomer to his works.

    One thing that really stood out in this collection is that in at least most of the stories a character would say "As the man would say..." and then drop a quote.
  • (3/5)
    A book of short stories by Stephen King. There were some good ones - other more forgettable but none up to the standard of his early short stories like The Body.
  • (4/5)
    Steven King can do no wrong in my eyes. I have like other stories of his better than these, but this collective is still captivating and ultimately entertaining. Enjoy!
  • (2/5)
    Not my favorite King compilation. The first story (Willa) was my favorite, and the last one (A Very Tight Place) was mainly just gross. Several of the stories dealt with post-9/11 themes, which is always hard.
  • (4/5)
    Excellent collection of King's short stories, definitely worth the read.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful book full of spine-tingling stories. King never fails to surprise me.
  • (4/5)
    His latest collection of short stories. Some I loved, others were just alright and some were rereads of short stories that have been published before. As I have mentioned before I am a huge King fan, so as long as he keeps writing I will keep reading.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed several of the stories in this book. The first one was butchered by narration I just couldn't tolerate. I enjoyed N, Graduation Day, the story about the stationary bike, The Things They Left Behind and the Gingerbread Bread Girl in particular. At first I enjoyed a story where one of the main characters was constantly referred to as the motherfucker, but the rest of the vulgarity got hard to take.
  • (4/5)
    Somewhat uneven collection of horror and suspense stories.
  • (4/5)
    To begin, I was going to give this collection 3 stars, but the final story is so good, ending my experience on such an up note, that I'm giving it 4! There are 13 tales in here (bad number!), and they range from so-so, to top notch! I liked "A Very Tight Place" a lot, having had my own negative experience in a port-a-potty, though not this negative! And "Rest Stop" reminded me of another experience of mine, down in Mexico. "Stationary Bike" really resonated with me on many levels. "Harvey's Dream" gave me the willies, big time! And "Mute" gave me the unreasonable urge to start picking up hitchhikers! So, pick this up and nibble away at the stories Uncle Stevie has left behind. They're good for what ails ya'!
  • (4/5)
    Stephen King writing is a treasure. Oh course, there are dark and twisted turns the focus on the negative side of life. He is the master of taking a simple idea and weaving it into a gripping story. Thanks for the hours of "enjoyment" from these "thrilling" stories. His short stories and novellas are particularly enjoyable and highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    King's previous three collections have been so poor that I put off reading this for quite a while, but it's actually rather good. If you've come here direct from Maugham or Clarke or Asimov you'll probably think I'm talking shit, but if you've come from Everything's Eventual then you're in for a pleasant surprise. The Gingerbread Girl was so tense at one point that I had to go and do the washing up.
  • (4/5)
    There are some readers who think that Stephen King is beneath them. But they are wrong. He writes some of the most entertaining and unsettling stories that I have ever read. I find that he tickles my imagination in just the right places. this collection of short stories offers a wide array of different kinds of unsettling premises: the kinds where a person's mental illness is actually a warning that evil in the world is closer then we think; the kind where a random evil, in the shape of a man, enters your life and you must determine if you are strong enough to fight back and the kind where the grossness of the situation, rather than the spookiness, is what grabs you. I enjoyed everything single one. I also found it interesting that one of the stories directly addressed the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The story based in this incident is one of the most humane and thoughtful pieces of writing about that tragedy that I have read.
  • (5/5)
    Just After Sunset: Stories by Stephen King features 13 short stories which were written in fairly quick succession over a two year period, according to the author's note in the back of the book. This book is not the typical Stephen King fare - there are a couple of horror stories here, but for the most part, Stephen King focuses on themes of the post-9/11 world, grief, loss and the afterlife in this collection. In 'Willa', the first story in this book, David and Willa, a young couple traveling to San Francisco, are waiting at a train depot after their train derails. They become separated from each other while waiting for another train to arrive, but there is just something eerie and unexplained about the situation in which they find themselves. To be completely honest, I needed to give myself a slight refresher course in this particular story as I had momentarily forgot the plot.'The Gingerbread Girl' focuses on Emily, a young woman who takes up running after her baby daughter, Amy dies. What initially begins as Emily's best way of escaping her grief, becomes the motive behind Emily's worst nightmare. This was actually a very good story - very suspenseful for me to read.'Harvey's Dream' is about Harvey - a man on the brink of retirement - telling his wife about a terribly disturbing dream that he's had the night before. This was also quite a good story - very enjoyable. According to the author's note in the back of the book, this story was entirely based on a dream that Stephen King himself had.In 'Rest Stop', a late night drive through the area causes a mild-mannered mystery writer to question his most appropriate course of action, when he overhears an argument between an obviously angry couple. In my opinion, this story was just okay.'Stationary Bike' focuses on a man who receives the results of his most recent physical - not so good results. Forced by his doctor to go on a strict exercise regimen, he creates more than he thinks when he paints himself a picture to help him pass the time on his stationary bike. This was also a very good story for me to read - in my opinion, this story was incredibly eerie.'The Things They Left Behind' is about Scott Staley, a man who should have died along with his co-workers on September 11, 2001, but curiously did not. Scott is not necessarily the 'Good Samaritan' type, but in August of 2002, while returning to his apartment after fixing his neighbor's air conditioner, Scott begins to find objects in his apartment that he had always associated with his now deceased co-workers. Scott does everything he can to get rid of each object, but no matter what he does, the objects always return to him. This was another very good story that I really enjoyed.In Graduation Afternoon, the unthinkable strikes New York City. In my opinion, this particular story was just alright. Definitely not my favorite of this collection, but then, I don't really enjoy reading stories with 'end-of-the-world', apocalyptic themes.In 'N.', a psychiatrist leaves behind notes on his delusional patient. N. is a troubled man who becomes increasingly suicidal throughout his sessions. When a mysterious key that once belonged to N. comes into the psychiatrist's possession, events are set in motion that can't be stopped. I really enjoyed this particular story. In my opinion, this one was perhaps the best one of the collection.'The Cat From Hell' is about Halston, a hitman paid to perform a peculiar task - one that ultimately isn't part of his job description. This story was well-written, but if you didn't actually like cats, 'The Cat From Hell' might scare you off owning one for life.'The New York Times at Special Bargain Rates' focuses on Annie - a recent widow who receives a phone call from her husband...on the day of his funeral. I have to say that I couldn't really understand the ending of this story very well.'Mute' is about a man whose life has just fallen apart around him. He is driving along one night and picks up a deaf/mute hitchhiker to whom he feels safe confessing all his troubles. In my opinion, this particular story was sort of middle of the road for me. Not really my cup of tea, I suppose, but just alright.'Ayana' is about terminally ill little girl who can heal others with a kiss. Her miraculous abilities are then passed on to those whom she has cured. This story was really very good - I enjoyed it.'A Very Tight Place' features two feuding neighbors locked in a bitter, continuous battle over a piece of land in the Florida Keys. One of them decides to finish the feud once and for all. I have to say that in my opinion, this final story was really rather disgusting - quite the note to end on, I suppose. :)Overall, Just After Sunset: Stories by Stephen King was really quite good. In general, I give this book an A+! Stephen King is an author who has an incredibly fertile imagination. The plot of each story was entirely different, but I do believe that his short stories tend to be stronger than many of his novels. I will certainly be keeping Just After Sunset: Stories on my bookshelf for the time being.
  • (3/5)
    Reading the first story, Willa. He builds suspense well. Too many adverbs though...
  • (4/5)
    I've heard that some of these stories were previously published, I myself haven't read any before. I do remember The Cat from Hell being part of Tales from the Darkside the movie. Among my favorites was The Gingerbread Girl. I could not put the book down while reading this one. It's classic King, suspenseful, creepy, with a touch of sarcastic humor when you least expect it. I love that about him. When you're heart is pounding, just at that scary moment, King will add humor that will make you burst out with nervous laughter. Maybe some who have read his books will know what I mean. I can see this short story being made into a tv movie. For the most part, I did enjoy most of the stories in this collection. However, there were a few I didn't like. Rest Stop for example is one I didn't enjoy. It wasn't boring, but I wanted creepy and scary; this wasn't. I don't know what it is about Kings work lately, I didn't enjoy his past two books, Lisey's Story and Duma Key. For me, his older stuff is better. And his short stories are usually great. My favorite short story collection of his is Everything's Eventual.
  • (4/5)
    A collection of tales, all modern day, dealing with a variety of horror & grief related issues. Common themes here include the Afterlife, it's presence or absence, grief, loss, murder, & ageing. These were readable without necessarily being fantastically enjoyable. The premise was often interesting, but the pacing & the narrative slow paced, & discursive. These are criticisms I've certainly had of King when I read him when I was younger. He almost lets the waffle get in the way of a good story. This probably wouldn't be a bad holiday book but wouldn't be something I'd keep unless I was a King completist.
  • (3/5)
    Uneven. King's a better writer in his longer stories. What I loved in this (The Gingerbread Girl, The Things They Left Behind, N.) I really loved. Others were so-so. Still others, such as The Cat from Hell, left me cold. Still, I'll reread many of these.
  • (3/5)
    One of the biggest problems of getting to know a certain author starting with his best books is that after you read them, you create an expectation whenever you see his name and, when you notice that the book is not all that you thought it would be, you feel double disappointed and end up thinking that the book is not good at all because it wasn't withing your expectations. This is pretty much what happened to me when I read this book: I read it right after reading the whole Dark Tower series and felt sort of disappointed. Well, VERY disappointed actually.

    Just After Sunset is a book of short stories from the master "suspense" genre (...no, not Alfred Hitchcock), Stephen King. All of them, obviously, have a beginning and a satisfying determined ending, meaning that you'll find no breach on them that might leave the reader in doubt of what might or might not happen. The influence of the Dark Tower series in the stories is pretty evident in the characters and even the street names. The tales are not that bad, but I felt that THE Stephen King essence was missing. Ok, they're short stories, but some of them are so short you can barely think of liking the characters.

    A book like any other. Definitely nothing OH MY GOD PERFECT. Good enough to make the time go by slightly faster. Nothing more than that.
  • (4/5)
    It's been years since I read anything by Stephen King that wasn't a column in Entertainment Weekly, but after tearing through this collection I will be picking up those books I missed.
  • (4/5)
    Finished last night. October 3 2009.
    Some stories were brilliant like The Gingerbread Girl, N and A Very Tight Place among others. Some i did not really care for like Graduation Afternoon and Harvey's Dream but I enjoyed reading this book. I've always loved short stories, used to collect short horror stories so I was very pleased to see King do one again.
  • (4/5)
    Another collection of King's shorter works. He's still got it!
  • (3/5)
    While I did enjoy this collection overall and it does contain a couple of gems (N,The Things They Left Behind, The Gingerbread Girl) this wasn't King's strongest collection of tales. The one thing that it does have going for it over some of his better collections is that there weren't any that I would consider stinkers. For the most part, the stories contained here were all average to above-average short stories but nothing that REALLY wowed me. It's definitely a worthwhile read though and as I said before several of the tales do manage to stand out.Of course, any downside that I have from this collection is purely from previous experience with King's short stories (along with reading some spectacular short story offerings from Richard Matheson, Joe Hill and H.P. Lovecraft.) I am of the opinion that the short story form is a perfect medium for horror because in a short format the author is better able to sustain the tension throughout the tale. That may be the one weakness that I found in this collection as a whole, in that King doesn't really take advantage of the format and doesn't really include a tale that keeps you on the edge of your seat terrified of what is happening and what may be coming next.
  • (2/5)
    I got this book signed by Stephen King when it first came out, which is why I'm so disappointed that I didn't enjoy it near as much as I was hoping. My first and only signed King book and I thought it was boring.I liked the Gingerbread Girl and N. pretty well, which seem to be the two favorites of this collection. I also enjoyed Harvey's Dream and Willa quite a bit, but I seem to be in the minority on that one. All of the stories were just bleh. I couldn't even finish the last story. I usually have a strong stomache but that one grossed me out way too much and I couldn't see any value in the story at all.
  • (4/5)
    Just after Sunset, published in November 2008, is a collection of thirteen (what more appropriate number than thirteen for a King collection) Stephen King short stories. The stories gathered into this volume appear to have been written over a number of years (one of them over 30 years ago) with the shortest of them clocking in at ten pages and the longest ones running over fifty pages each. In the book?s introduction, King laments about how easy it is for a novelist to lose his short story writing skills if he does not regularly practice the craft. Obviously, from what we see here, he need not have worried too much. Of the stories in the collection, only one of them, a story called ?N.? would really be called a Stephen-King-style horror story ? although there is one other about a horrifying cat, titled ?The Cat from Hell,? that does come close. That one, the oldest story in the book, was originally published in Cavalier magazine but this is the first time that it has been included in a Stephen King story collection. I should note, too, that there are several ?ghost stories? in Just after Sunset, but none of these qualify as horror stories since the ghosts in them are generally among the stories? most sympathetic characters.Many readers, especially King fans, already will be familiar with ?The Gingerbread Girl,? a longish story that was released on CD as an audio story about six months before its inclusion in Just after Sunset. This is one of the most effective stories in the book, and it follows the theme of what I think are the best stories in this collection ? that is: wacky killers, crazed seekers of revenge, and crazy do-gooders are best avoided at all costs.My personal favorites are ?A Very Tight Place,? in which King demonstrates that he can still write a ?gross-out? story with the best of them; ?Stationary Bike,? a story in which one man learns what it really takes to keep his veins and arteries clear of all the goop he eats; and, ?The Things They Left Behind,? an excellent story of one man?s survivor?s guilt after the murders of 9-11.All in all, this is a nice collection of King?s work, and the icing on the cake is a seven-page section at the end entitled ?Sunset Notes,? in which King explains the origins of the stories and why he felt compelled to write them. King fans should enjoy this collection ? and those less familiar with his work might be pleasantly surprised.Rated at: 4.0
  • (5/5)
    A great collection of short stories by the fright master himself, Stephen King. Personally my favorites in this book were Cat From Hell, A Very Tight Place, and Stationary Bike. Many people claim that "N" is a great story but I found it to be boring.
  • (2/5)
    I was very disappointed in this Stephen King book. The first story took awhile to become interesting. I knew some twist had to be coming since it is a SK book, but I didn't enjoy the story up to that point. The only story I really enjoyed was "The Cat from Hell." Very disappointing for a Stephen King book!