Finden Sie Ihren nächsten hörbuch Favoriten

Werden Sie noch heute Mitglied und hören Sie 30 Tage lang kostenlos
Sourland: Stories of Loss, Grief, and Forgetting

Sourland: Stories of Loss, Grief, and Forgetting

Geschrieben von Joyce Carol Oates

Erzählt von Coleen Marlo


Sourland: Stories of Loss, Grief, and Forgetting

Geschrieben von Joyce Carol Oates

Erzählt von Coleen Marlo

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (4 Bewertungen)
Länge:
14 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Sep 14, 2010
ISBN:
9780062006998
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

A gripping and moving new collection of stories that reimagines the meaning of loss – through often unexpected and violent means.

Joyce Carol Oates is not only one of our most important novelists and literary critics, she is also an unparalleled master of the short story. Sourland – 16 previously uncollected stories that explore how the power of violence, loss, and grief shape both the psyche and the soul – shows us an author working at the height of her powers.

With lapidary precision and an unflinching eye, Oates maps the surprising contours of “ordinary” life. From a desperate man who dons a jack-o’-lantern head as a prelude to a most curious sort of courtship, to a “story of a stabbing” many times recounted in the life of a lonely girl; from a beguiling young woman librarian whose amputee state attracts a married man and father, to a girl hopelessly in love with her renegade, incarcerated cousin; from a professor’s wife who finds herself tragically isolated at a party in her own house, to the concluding title story of an unexpectedly redemptive love rooted in radical aloneness and isolation, each story in Sourland resonates beautifully with Oates’s trademark fascination for the unpredictable amid the prosaic – the co-mingling of sexual love and violence, the tumult of family life – and shines with her predilection for dark humor and her gift for voice.

A HarperAudio production.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Sep 14, 2010
ISBN:
9780062006998
Format:
Hörbuch


Über den Autor

Joyce Carol Oates is a novelist, critic, playwright, poet and author of short stories and one of America’s most respected literary figures. She has written some of the most enduring fiction of our time, including We Were the Mulvaneys and Blonde. She is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of Humanities at Princeton University and a recipient of the National Book Award and the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction.

Ähnlich wie Sourland

Ähnliche Hörbücher
Ähnliche Artikel

Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Sourland denken

3.3
4 Bewertungen / 4 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (2/5)
    could have been better. Wasn't engaged at all. perhaps it is the theme
  • (3/5)
    Disappointing--felt very repetitious of earlier themes. Maybe more interest from a biographical point of view than a literary one, as several stories show the influence of her husband's death--but then I think I'd just as soon read the memoir.
  • (4/5)
    Sourland: Stories is a collection of sixteen Joyce Carol Oates short stories, fifteen of which appear to have been written in 2009 or early 2010. The third story in the collection, “The Babysitter,” was first published in Ellery Queen and was reprinted in Horror: The Best of the Year 2006. Readers who know something of Oates’s personal history will notice how clearly the tone of this work reflects the impact the author felt from the loss of her husband of some forty-seven years, Raymond Smith. Mr. Smith, who seemed to be recovering from the illness that hospitalized him, died suddenly on February 18, 2008. Considering the subject matter and feel of the stories, I do find it interesting that the book’s dedication reads: “for my husband Charlie Gross.”Most of the stories reflect themes that fans of Oates’s work have come to expect from her: the persistent possibility of violence when it is least expected, adult males taking advantage of the innocence of young females, the often violent clash of the privileged class with those who have nothing much to lose, and the chaotic shock of sudden loss. Several of these stories, however, in the persons of freshly minted widows, reflect more precisely the feelings expressed by Oates in her late 2010 memoir, A Widow’s Story. Not surprisingly, these are the strongest stories in the collection.The collection opens with one of these stories, “Pumpkin Head,” in which a young, isolated widow innocently sends all the wrong signals to an immigrant from Central Europe who offers to do her a personal favor. When the man’s frustration with his new life in America suddenly explodes, she is a bit bewildered to find herself in the line of fire.The book’s title story, “Sourland,” and the one called “Probate,” are particularly reminiscent of the experiences and feelings described by Oates in her recent memoir. The widows in each of these stories are still unprepared to function in the real world, but are unable to communicate their desperation and confusion to anyone who might help ease them back into a semblance of the life they knew before losing their husbands. In “Sourland,” Sophie allows nostalgia and sweet memories of the stranger who has mysteriously contacted her to lure her into a remote area from which she fears she may never escape. “Probate” is the dreamlike experience of newly widowed Adrienne whose courthouse experiences are horrifyingly detailed. Both stories, in fact, probably resemble the type of nightmare one would expect a new widow to experience.Other stories in the collection are more akin to what one expects from Oates. A young married woman seeks marital revenge and almost dies in the process. A 14-year-old girl is molested by a formerly admired teacher she happens to meet in a hospital. The defender of one family’s honor pays for his audacity in the most heartbreaking way possible. A little boy becomes terrified of his own father and refuses to give away his hiding spot despite the danger he is in. And, there is more, much more.Not all of the stories work equally well, of course. Two “stream of consciousness” pieces and one other story left me particularly bewildered, but I am inclined to blame myself for that as much as I would put the burden on Oates. Sourland is a collection of some of the darkest, most disturbing, tales being written today. That it is also one of the most personal collections of stories ever released by Joyce Carol Oates makes it even more memorable.Rated at: 3.5
  • (4/5)
    Oates short stories feature people at their most vulnerable: widowed women, neglected children, unlovable men. And as is typical with Oates, if the reader assumes the worst possible outcome for the vulnerable characters as the plot unfolds, they will only be surprised that Oates dreams up something even worse--more violence, more humiliation, more disaster than you thought possible! Her poor, tortured characters. Oates puts real-life disaster into perspective somehow, so that you can put down her book and realize that what is happening around you isn't so bad, considering.