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Hearts In Atlantis

Hearts In Atlantis

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Stephen King und William Hurt


Hearts In Atlantis

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Stephen King und William Hurt

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (147 Bewertungen)
Länge:
20 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Sep 1, 2001
ISBN:
9780743563352
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

Stephen King, whose first novel, Carrie, was published in 1974, the year before the last U.S. troops withdrew from Vietnam, is the first hugely popular writer of the TV generation. Images from that war -- and the protests against it -- had flooded America's living rooms for a decade. Hearts In Atlantis is composed of five interconnected, sequential narratives set in the years from 1960 to 1999. Each story is deeply rooted in the sixties, and each is haunted by the Vietnam War.
In "Low Men in Yellow Coats," eleven-year-old Bobby Garfield discovers a world of predatory malice in his own neighborhood and that adults are sometimes not rescuers but at the heart of the terror.
In the title story, a bunch of college kids get hooked on a card game, discover the possibility of protest...and confront their own collective heart of darkness, where laughter may be no more than the thinly disguised cry of the beast.
In "Blind Willie" and "Why We're in Vietnam," two men who grew up with Bobby in suburban Connecticut try to fill the emptiness of the post-Vietnam era in an America which sometimes seems as hollow and haunted as their own lives.
And in "Heavenly Shades of Night Are Falling," Bobby returns to his hometown where one final secret, and his heart's desire may await him.
Full of danger, suspense, and full of heart, Hearts In Atlantis takes some listeners to a place they have never been...and others to a place they have never been able to completely leave.
Freigegeben:
Sep 1, 2001
ISBN:
9780743563352
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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4.3
147 Bewertungen / 50 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    Officially considered a collection of two novellas and three short stories, Hearts in Atlantis can also be read as a novel since the stories are linked by recurring characters. I read the book as a criticism of the Vietnam War and the generation affected by it. All the stories are in chronological order and hence the first story sets the stage for what comes later. Its name "Low Men in Yellow Coats" perfectly describes what it revolves around and regular Stephen King readers will certainly recognize the connection to his Dark Tower series. Bobby Garfield becomes friends with Ted Brautigan who is running away from the low men in yellow coats mentioned in the title. They want to bring him back to a parallel universe where Ted Brautigan works as a Breaker of the Beam and reluctantly serves the Crimson King.The second story is called "Hearts in Atlantis" and gives the book its title. It is about college students at the University of Maine in 1966. Protagonist Peter and his fellow students are addicted to playing Hearts in their dorm. These students neglect their studies and only think about their beloved card game. Stokely Jones, who does not belong to the players, meanwhile becomes active in anti-war protests and wears the Peace sign on his jacket. Soon, a movement against the war develops.On the whole, the first two stories are the ones I liked best about the book. The other stories are also very good, but the first two are simply superb to my mind. I would recommend this book to everyone who already loves Stephen King novels, but also to readers who want to try Stephen King. A great book, 4 stars.
  • (3/5)
    I think I last read a Stephen King novel in the 70's. I don't like the Horror genre of books and since that is what his books generally are, I didn't see any reason to read them. And I have to say that this book, although not horror per se, doesn't dispose me to read any more. However I know there are lots of King fans out there so I hope whoever this goes to next will enjoy it more than I did. There are some good points about this book. King's depiction of the start of the anti-Vietnam War movement rings true as does his portrayal of the Vietnam War vets except for Willie who I really had a hard time believing. His various ways of presenting the psychology of the pack, especially the freshmen students playing Hearts, were interesting. The constant allusions to Lord of the Flies was a little heavy-handed though.
  • (5/5)
    I usually do not like King, but this book was simply amazing. An emotional roller coaster.
  • (5/5)
    Hearts in Atlantis has just taken its place as my favorite Stephen King novel. At first I was prepared to find this one mediocre, only liking the stories that directly related to my Dark Tower reading project. Instead I found this an incredible, melancholy lament for the children of the 60s, of the lost innocence that happened to this generation over the course of the thirty-nine years the book covers.Not a full novel, but a collection of seemingly disparate novellas and short stories that actually all connect to one another through a series of characters. To me, the most fascinating feature of this connection is that it's not through any leading character that somehow connects all the others in some way only to tie it all together in the end. No, the one connecting factor in all of the stories making up Hearts in Atlantis is Carol Gerber.Starting as a secondary character in "Low Men in Yellow Coats" (the primary Dark Tower story here), Carol flits through the lives of the main characters in some way, is either intentionally or unintentionally responsible for helping to drive their stories along. From her friendship and love of Bobby Garfield in "Low Men," we follow her to college where she falls for Pete Riley, narrator and Hearts addict of "Hearts in Atlantis." As Vietnam heats up, Carol becomes an anti-war protester and her life becomes fodder for the news, managing to unintentionally affect her former tormentor Willie Shearman as he does his penance in "Blind Willie" and childhood friend turned high school boyfriend John "Sully-John" Sullivan in "Why We're in Vietnam." The rest of Carol's strange and fascinating life as "Red Carol" remains as speculation when she reunites with Bobby in the final tale, "Heavenly Shades of Night are Falling." The Platters' "Twilight Time" is also a recurring theme in these stories.Hearts in Atlantis is a brilliant example of a writer's use of sonder, the realization that each random passerby has their own rich and unique story. This is something I have always tried to incorporate into my own writing, using a minor character in one story as the lead in another; and this is what King does brilliantly here. Seeing other people from Carol Gerber's childhood interacting with those she knew in college, often without knowing of any actual connection to the girl herself, is one of my favorite parts of this book.So, yes, this is one that I highly recommend if you're looking for a good cry over the lost potential of people and the loss of innocence from childhood to adulthood.
  • (3/5)
    Ok, SteveYou wrote this looooonnnnngggg book and I still don't know what happened to the guy who was pretending to be blind; I would have gladly read another 200-300 pages to learn more about these interesting characters. Being a Hippy that was born a bit late, I was moved by memories over and over at the mention of the music that really rocks me*******All those oldies******Still love you, though...SMILE!!!
  • (3/5)
    Another great display of how King can write from the perspective of a child.
  • (1/5)
    I love a good Stephen King novel, but this is DEFINITELY NOT one of them!! The only passable story is the first one. The 3 others were awful I’m sorry to say. He did some intertwining of characters between the different stories, each with a different main character, and a different time of life, I can see what he was going for but it just didn’t work for me at all! The second was the worst to me, it was set in a college dorm in the late 60’s, and it went on and on about all these boys getting caught up gambling playing Hearts, i was totally annoyed by all these boys having to drop out because they kept playing and flunked out. Anyway, I would recommend skipping this one
  • (2/5)
    First half thrilling even..... second half seemed a waist.... like a few loose tie ins to characters who never matter as a sci fi story turns udderly normal memoire dragggged out forever..... no thanks....
  • (3/5)
    Fhyy66777⁷yyyu788iuuiiii888i uujbuuubbujuu6 and dad ghey were the only thing I
  • (5/5)
    My second favorite King book, I absolutely loved it. The movie was decent, too, but the details King gives and the way King writes are so good, you shouldn't deprive yourself.
  • (4/5)
    This book rightfully feels like three books. The coming of age story about Bobby, the story about America’s students coming to grips with their feelings about the war in Vietnam and the story of Willie and Sully about the horrors of war.
    The characters are nuanced and interesting. The story is a bit slow, but at the end it feels complete and worth the wait.
    I would recommend, wouldn’t re-read at this point.
  • (3/5)
    I "read" this as an audio book, read wonderfully by William Hurt and Stephen King. It's not very supernatural and not very spooky and was a good summer read.
  • (4/5)
    I wish that Bobby and Ted's main story was the only one and that it were longer. It was fabulous. The other stories were good, too, but sad.

    Now when I re-read The Dark Tower series, I'll have a better understanding of Ted.
  • (4/5)
    The book is split up into three sections: the first describing Bobby Garfield's encounter with Ted, a Breaker running from the Low Men in Yellow Coats, who are beings from another world.

    Ted's role in some shady, dystopian Universal Plan is never explained: only that he has some power the Low Men need. Bobby's sole encounter with them change both his life and HIM.

    The second section is more Carol Gerber's story, although even she is swept aside in a description of the
    60s and the effects of the Vietnam War, not to mention a semester-long Hearts game that nearly derails the academic career of this section's narrator, Peter. Normally this wouldn't novel material, but this was a time when there was a draft. Getting kicked out of college meant you went to Vietnam, if you were a guy.

    In the third section Bobby is a just-past middle-aged man who must come to terms with his encounter with Ted and how it changed his childhood, and therefore his life.
  • (4/5)
    5 stories in this collection, connected by characters and the war in Vietnam. They span from 1960-1999. The first two novellas are terrific, just like the tales in "Different Seasons". The following two short stories are average. And the final one wraps it all up in a satisfying ribbon! And if you are a DT reader, you'll find a Breaker in here!
  • (5/5)
    "Low Men in Yellow Coats" was the only reason to read this book, in my opinion. King brilliantly ties it in with DT. PLUS, that might have been one of the creepiest stories I have EVER read
  • (4/5)
    A series of stories that together add up to rather a good novel. I thoroughly enjoyed it. A bitter-sweet meditation on the loss of childhood innocence. The fantasy elements tie in to the Dark Tower series but you don't need to have read that to enjoy this. In fact, it's probably better if you haven't as it adds a sense of mystery.
  • (4/5)
    Audiobook version. I loved, loved, loved, William Hurt's performance. Although he doesn't put much effort into creating different voices for all the characters, he reads the story with such passion and... rhythm. That's the only word I can think of to describe it. The only two stories that I really enjoyed were Low Men in Yellow Coats and Why We're In Vietnam. The rest I could do without, but the others were classic King.
  • (4/5)
    Hearts in Atlantis by Stephen King is five loosely-related stories combined to form the whole: 1. Low Men in Yellow Coats, 2. Hearts in Atlantis, 3. Blind Willie, 4. Why We're in Vietnam, and 5. Heavenly Shades of Night Are Falling. The 1st and the 5th eventually became the movie version of the same name starring Anthony Hopkins.I loved Bobby and Ted's story in Low Men in Yellow Coats and Heavenly Shades of Night Are Falling, and I remember #2, Hearts in Atlantis being pretty good too. I can't recall anything about Blind Willie or Why We're in Vietnam.Hearts is a strong tie-novel to King's Dark Tower story, but I feel like some of the magic of Ted Brautigan's story was lost once the Tower story concluded.
  • (3/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    The plot wasn’t very strong, but the narration was good

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (5/5)
    ?????Hearts in Atlantis by Stephen King

    Hearts in Atlantis by Stephen King was a great book, in my opinion. It contains 5 short stories, from different period in Bobby's life.
    The first is Low Men in Yellow Coats. In this one we learn Bobby's dad died young, of a heart attack, and loved to gamble. And he's mom's favorite saying is "your father didn't exactly leave us well off." He see a bike he really wants for his 11th birthday, but she says they can't afford it.
    The second is Hearts in Atlantis. Blind Willie is third. And Why We're in Vietnam is the fourth.
    Heavenly Shades of Night are Falling, ends the book, with Bobby coming back home, grown up. He hopes to find his first love still there. Redemption, might just happen for him after all. And there still is that one secret, but will it come out.
    I would recommend this book, but if you want to watch the movie, I'd say to do that first. I had such high hopes for the movie after reading this book, but was very disappointed, because I felt cheated. I was expecting it to be off the whole book, but was not even close.
  • (2/5)
    I'm only giving it 2 stars because of the horrendously irritating background music. Makes my eye twitch every time the music comes up.
  • (3/5)
    Well written but King got dull after Tommyknockers this is no exception.
  • (2/5)
    This was my first Stephen King book, and unfortunately I can say I?m not that impressed. The book is cut into five parts, the first four being about totally different people and the fifth attempting to tie all four characters together. The first story was a little interesting. The second story was okay, The third and fourth lost me. I ended up scanning those stories. And the fifth just messed with my head. I was so confused by the end of the book and not in a thoughtfully good way. I?ve heard good things about King?s writing, but this is surely not what they were talking about. The writing was solid but the story did not entertain me.
  • (2/5)
    These 5 loosely connected novellas left me confused and cold. It never came together for me.
  • (4/5)
    There's a lot to like about this collection of long stories. The opener, "Low Men in Yellow Coats," is set firmly in the Dark Tower universe but also a great standalone coming-of-age story. The remaining stories are about the Vietnam generation, both during the war and after it, and aren't necessarily the supernatural horror that King is known for. Of these, the most compelling are the title story and "Heavenly Shades of Night Are Falling," the last story, but the entire collection is very good writing and kind of a departure for King.
  • (3/5)
    Another loose end from The Dark Tower is tied up, which is always good. King's theory of everything is at work in these five stories and I like them for that.
  • (1/5)
    I read Hearts several years ago. I don't think I finished this one. By the halfway point, it was becoming monotonous, increasing foul language that served no purpose (not that I'm a prude, but...enough already), a general feeling of, "where are we going with this story?" Not one of his better ones.
  • (4/5)
    Hearts in Atlantis is the second book I read for the War Through the Generations - Vietnam War challenge. When I was choosing the books to read for this challenge, I picked this one simply because it is written by Stephen King and I love his books. My plan is to read all his books, eventually!This book is made up of five novellas mostly based in the 60's, where Atlantis is essentially America. In the first novella, "Low Men in Yellow Coats", Bobby is a normal eleven year old who hangs out with his best friends Carol and Sully-John. When his new neighbor Ted moves in, Bobby finds a friend in the old man as they share their love for books and Bobby is introduced to Lord of the Flies. From there Bobby learns of the true evil some people are capable of and takes his first steps towards adolescence. Although this is not directly related to the Vietnam war, it prepares you for what's coming next.The second one, "Hearts in Atlantis", is narrated by Pete. Currently a freshman at the University of Maine, Pete and his friends become addicted to playing Hearts and are risking flunking out, which at that time meant being drafted for Vietnam. In this story, Carol has moved from Connecticut and goes to the same University as Pete, but Carol has changed a lot since her adventures with Bobby and Sully-John. In "Blind Willie", Willie Shearman is a Vietnam veteran who is doing penance for the biggest misdeeds he committed in his life, helping to beat Carol when he was a bully in his adolescence and the atrocities he committed in Vietnam."Why We're in Vietnam" details Sully-John's post-war experience when he attends a funeral of one of his fellow veterans. Even though a few years have gone by, Sully-John is still haunted by his experience in the Vietnam war, and especially by old mamasan, a Vietnamese woman that he has watched being brutally killed. Old mamasan visits him often and does so one last time as he's stuck in a traffic jam driving back from the funeral.Finally, "Heavenly Shades of Night are Falling" is the closing story in which Bobby returns to Connecticut to pay his last respects to his childhood friend. He is looking for answers and perhaps for redemption, when he meets Carol once again and discovers the fate of his friends.Hearts in Atlantis is not what King is usually famous for, i.e. horror and gory scenes but it reminds me more of Different Seasons by him, however I enjoyed this book much more. I started to like it from the very beginning and could not put it down until I finished it. My favorite story was definitely the first one, I loved the young Bobby and Ted and would have liked to see more of both characters in the other stories. The first novella also contains references to The Dark Tower series, which I have not yet read so far but after this book I am eager to find out more about it. The references to Vietnam are not always direct, but it gives you a lot to think about and more than once I had to stop and digest what I just read on how the Vietnam war divided the country and the repercussions that came after. King's style of writing in this book is as good as ever, he really cannot be beaten in that regard, every time I read a novel by him I remember why I like this author so much!
  • (5/5)
    King takes us on a journey through time and presents the 60's in a way that only he can. First, through the eyes of an adolescent boy, and later through a number of characters, King writes a coming of age novel that centers around the tumultuous era of the Vietnam War. Though some of King's trademark style can be seen, the majority of the novel deals only with human life and emotions. Focusing on the web of incidental occurrences that link us all together.