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Lisey's Story

Lisey's Story

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Mare Winningham


Lisey's Story

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Mare Winningham

Bewertungen:
4/5 (261 Bewertungen)
Länge:
19 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Oct 24, 2006
ISBN:
9780743561945
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Lisey Debusher Landon lost her husband Scott two years ago, after a twenty-five year marriage of the most profound and sometimes frightening intimacy. Scott was an award-winning, bestselling novelist and a very complicated man. Early in their relationship, before they married, Lisey had to learn from him about books and blood and bools. Later, she understood that there was a place Scott went -- a place that both terrified and healed him, could eat him alive or give him the ideas he needed in order to live. Now it's Lisey's turn to face Scott's demons, Lisey's turn to go to Boo'ya Moon. What begins as a widow's effort to sort through the papers of her celebrated husband becomes a nearly fatal journey into the darkness he inhabited. Perhaps King's most personal and powerful story ever, Lisey's Story is about the wellsprings of creativity, the temptations of madness, and the secret language of love.
Freigegeben:
Oct 24, 2006
ISBN:
9780743561945
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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  • (1/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    This seems to be an abruptly abridged version?? The audiobook should be 19 hours, but this is only 2. No wonder it was so disjointed!

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (5/5)
    Scott Landon was an award-winning, best-selling novelist and he and his wife Lisey Debusher Landon had been happily married for twenty-five years until his untimely death. Their relationship may have been filled with the typical ups and downs that every couple experiences, but overall, Lisey believed that their marriage was extraordinarily and profoundly intimate - sometimes frighteningly intimate. Scott Landon had recently passed away two years ago, and Lisey is only now coming to terms with what a complicated man her husband truly was.Lisey had always suspected that her husband had sometimes lived in a world of his own - a world of dark secrets that threatened to consume him utterly. As a matter of fact, Scott himself had taught Lisey about the different sides of his personality - sides that she sometimes found endearingly charming, yet sometimes disturbingly eccentric. Yet, she also believed that their enduring love for each other would always be the key that was strong enough to protect Scott from himself.Starting early on in their relationship, even before their marriage, Lisey learned about many things from Scott. As a matter of fact, she had to learn about these things in order to better understand the man who would soon become her husband. She had to learn about the importance of books and blood and bools - indeed, there were certain times during their life together, when Lisey believed that Scott was actually trying to teach her a completely different language - a whole new perspective on life that was entirely their own.It was only later when Lisey began to realize - no, to truly understand - that there was actually a special place where Scott went to be alone. It was a place within his own mind that both terrified and healed him, a place that could alternately eat him alive or give him the ideas he needed in order to live. It was a place of sunlight and shadow, genius and creativity - a world entirely of his own creation, known as 'Boo'ya Moon'. Now it's Lisey's turn to face Scott's demons; her turn to make her own journey to 'Boo'ya Moon'.What begins as a grieving widow's effort to sort through her esteemed husband's personal papers, becomes a nearly fatal journey into the darkness that had enveloped Scott Landon's mind and soul. So now it falls to Lisey, to make her own pilgrimage to honor her husband's memory. She must find her own way to journey to Scott's special place - the place where his wealth of creativity and imagination existed; and dwelt alongside his increasing fear of his encroaching insanity.I've recently discovered that Stephen King considers this book to be his favorite one of all his works. Indeed, Lisey's Story: A Novel is definitely Stephen King's most personal novel that he has written, as the genesis of his ideas for the story came about during his convalescence from the near-fatal car accident that he suffered in June of 1999. In my opinion, my own favorite book by Stephen King is Pet Sematary - which was written in 1983.Actually, I must say that I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. Perhaps it wasn't my absolute favorite, but I still found it to be extremely well-developed and highly intriguing. The plot of Lisey's Story: A Novel by Stephen King was extraordinarily imaginative and descriptive. Overall, I enjoyed the story very much, although I found certain parts of the story to be almost overwhelmingly descriptive.I must admit that while these particular scenes were certainly very well-written; I generally tried to avoid them - as they tended to give me what Mareena calls 'the cringing skin crawls'. I would also like to mention that in my own opinion, this book probably could have benefitted from being approximately one hundred pages shorter. Having said that, I would still give this book a strong A!
  • (2/5)
    Probably the only Stephen King book that was not part of a series that I didn't like. I found it hard to stay with the story and it had long descriptions that didn't seem to have anything to do with the story.
  • (3/5)
    Very enjoyable read about Lisey coping with the loss of her partner and some of the fantasy elements that were just part of her life.
  • (4/5)
    Lisey's Story by Stephen King is a story about Lisey and the love she has for her husband.I adore King's work, and this book was no exception. To me, this is a love story only the way King can do it, and of course there is imagination running amok. All I can say is that I loved it, but I'm bias when it comes to King which is why I usually don't review his books. But I figured I'd write a few words about it since it's included in my book challenge.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book!
  • (1/5)
    I normally love a Stephen King book, but not this one. I didn't like the repetition (which is present in most King books, he seems to latch onto some particular phrase or device and just clings for dear life) of the phonetic spelling of words or names. Maybe once to illustrate someone's accent, but after that, it just becomes very annoying for me to read.Don't get me started on 'smucking'. Yes yes, Lisey and Scott were super super special and connected, blah blah. There was a good story here, supernatural and mental illness, but I couldn't stick with Lisey long enough to appreciate it.
  • (5/5)
    A great book. Stephen King creates another of his interesting beyond-the-looking-glass worlds for this one, as he's done so well in The Talisman, and the Dark Tower series. It's a satisfying blend of fantasy, supernatural mystery, bad childhood overcome, and especially, a love story. And as usual, with a Stephen King novel, the character is so well voiced that I found myself with bits and pieces of her worldview knocking around in my head for several days afterward. One of the things I like best about a good King novel is that, while you know it's completely fictional, and obviously farfetched, it seems somehow plausible. Perhaps because he never breaks character, or because he includes just enough details from the non-fictional world we all live in to tie it together, or because, if only things in it WERE true, they would explain the unexplainable in some way (where DO you go, if you are in a coma, for instance?). Although I think part of it is - someone ought to coin a new phrase for this - but some novels just have a way of getting it right, of seeming like a dream you might have had yourself. Tapping into the collective unconscious? I'm going to lose people here, with my half-formed theories, but you don't have to examine why a book works to know that it does. Highly recommended.
  • (2/5)
    I've never read any Stephen King before, but I received this as an advance and decided now was as good a time as any to give him a try. Many friends and fellow readers whose opinions I think very highly of are huge Stephen King fans, so I consider the lack of King's book in my arsenal to be rather shameful. However, I'm not sure Lisey's Story was the place to start.Frankly, I can say very little about this book because I read very little of this book. I tried -- really and truly tried -- to hang on and to complete my first King novel, but it failed to capture my interest rather spectacularly. I found myself staring out of windows at absolutely nothing in order to avoid reading this book. I actually made it about 100 or so pages in, but felt like I still knew next to nothing about Lisey, a character whose head I had been inside since I began reading the novel. Her grief for her husband, while trying to come off as deep and profound, simply felt a little flat. More like the idea of grief than anything resembling actual grief. I don't think it helped that as a native (and lifelong) Nashvillian, some major portions of what I read took place in what was supposed to be Nashville, but bore little to no resemblance to the actual city. I suppose readers who live in cities that feature more often in fictional works handle this better. For me it is just startling and takes me out of the narrative. However, I suppose that isn't a complaint that would matter much to anyone who doesn't live in the Greater Nashville area. Nonetheless, I believe it did contribute to my putting this book down once and for all.I'll give King another shot, I'm sure. I hear Hearts in Atlantis is great, but it will be a long time, if ever, before I try to puzzle out the story or Lisey again.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent book! So very moving! I have read it 2 times and have now listened once. Worth the effort every single time. Moves me to tears every time and I do not allow my tears freedom to leave my eyes very often.

    Thank you Stephen King for sharing this story from beneath the writing tree!
  • (5/5)
    One of the best audiobooks I’ve listened to so far. Mare Winninghamn does an excellent job of breathing life into all the characters and making each unique. You know when Lisey is speaking and when Amanda is speaking—they don’t sound alike. Winninghamn brings all her gifts as an actress to this monumental task, filling it with honest emotions. Particularly poignant is her interpretation of Scott Landon as a boy. Your heart breaks and you feel terrified for him. Excellent job.
  • (5/5)
    Stephen king always writes excellent books love his books thank you for having it ib scribd
  • (5/5)
    Favorite Stephen King book . Traveling to BooYa Moon and it’s magical pool of wonder and two small boys living rough with a mean old man, I didn’t want this novel to end...Seems fantastically plausible.
  • (5/5)
    I’m not going to lie, the ending had me crying. Not many King books make me emotional.
  • (5/5)
    I had held off reading this for years but man, I'm so glad that I finally did. It was lovingly heartwrenching especially at the end. Lisey is pronounced like Lisa with an ee, or Leesey, like Lacey? I had thought it was more like Liza, Eiza Jane? Maybe just me!! The love that she felt for her Scott and the love and bond that she shared was just so .....felt, that it aches. He does go back and forth between 3 time eras, but anyone familiar with King's writings should be familiar with that, which I definitely am. The country songs referenced I can here plainly and they hit a chord (no pun intended) that sings with the story. Kudos yet again. Mr. King... as always!
  • (3/5)
    Some elements were good, while others were so bizarre and not explained that i can't say i would recommend this one. i am a fan, however, and it is part of king's work, so i am pleased to have it in the library of works read.
  • (4/5)
    You know how sometimes someone on the internet recommends a book that you'd not normally give a second glance, but then you see it somewhere serendipitiously and it rings a bell and you decide to give it a go because WHY NOT? That's what happened with this book, and it was SO GOOD. It's a big novel - 700 pages or so - and quite slow-building, but so worth it. It starts out as a gentle story of grief and recovery after the loss of a spouse, and becomes a fascinating and exciting novel taking in everything from sisterly love to other worlds to mental illness to stalker violence. Not one I'd have picked up on my own - but I'm glad I did!
  • (4/5)
    A nice reminder of why I still read King: excellent main character, compelling story that manages to be both magical and creepy as hell, and a pace that never lets up. Up there with some of King's best.
  • (2/5)
    I've never read any Stephen King before, but I received this as an advance and decided now was as good a time as any to give him a try. Many friends and fellow readers whose opinions I think very highly of are huge Stephen King fans, so I consider the lack of King's book in my arsenal to be rather shameful. However, I'm not sure Lisey's Story was the place to start.Frankly, I can say very little about this book because I read very little of this book. I tried -- really and truly tried -- to hang on and to complete my first King novel, but it failed to capture my interest rather spectacularly. I found myself staring out of windows at absolutely nothing in order to avoid reading this book. I actually made it about 100 or so pages in, but felt like I still knew next to nothing about Lisey, a character whose head I had been inside since I began reading the novel. Her grief for her husband, while trying to come off as deep and profound, simply felt a little flat. More like the idea of grief than anything resembling actual grief. I don't think it helped that as a native (and lifelong) Nashvillian, some major portions of what I read took place in what was supposed to be Nashville, but bore little to no resemblance to the actual city. I suppose readers who live in cities that feature more often in fictional works handle this better. For me it is just startling and takes me out of the narrative. However, I suppose that isn't a complaint that would matter much to anyone who doesn't live in the Greater Nashville area. Nonetheless, I believe it did contribute to my putting this book down once and for all.I'll give King another shot, I'm sure. I hear Hearts in Atlantis is great, but it will be a long time, if ever, before I try to puzzle out the story or Lisey again.
  • (3/5)
    This story started out really slow for me, but then got cooking! I liked the story a lot, but it was sometimes hard to follow as the events are not in order. And I was reminded a bit of King's other book "Misery" and the movie "Frailty", which took a little away from the originality of it all. Still, I'm glad I read it, even if just to have words like "bool" and "smucking" in my vocab now! And Lisey is a great character, as is he sister Amanda.
  • (5/5)
    What I love most about Stephen King's books is that he makes his character's narrative so conversational that you feel that you actually know them. Listening to this on audio, I wanted to live in a world where Lisey, Scott, and Amanda all lived. I was overjoyed to turn on my CD player at night and find out where we were going next in the story. Mare Winningham did a fantastic job narrating, with just enough inflection to distinguish the characters without going over the top. Lisey and Scott's pet words for things are infectious, just like when you know people in real life. I know I'll smucking say things from the novel for a while. At times suspenseful, others fantastical, and with shots of laugh out loud humor throughout, it was one wild ride.
  • (1/5)
    Luckily my copy was cheap as it's a bit of a mess. It's a back and forward sort of affair through time, told largely in dream sequences. I'm allergic to dream sequences. There's also a sort of verbal static pervading the text: unnecessary interjections, many in italics. I suppose this is what they call Art. The characters are uninteresting and the tone is bland and smug. King almost died a few year before this was published and I suppose it's his way of exploring a husband's fear for his widow's safety, but this is not the way to do it, with its half-arsed fantasy world and half-arsed scenes of mild peril.
  • (5/5)
    A great book. Stephen King creates another of his interesting beyond-the-looking-glass worlds for this one, as he's done so well in The Talisman, and the Dark Tower series. It's a satisfying blend of fantasy, supernatural mystery, bad childhood overcome, and especially, a love story. And as usual, with a Stephen King novel, the character is so well voiced that I found myself with bits and pieces of her worldview knocking around in my head for several days afterward. One of the things I like best about a good King novel is that, while you know it's completely fictional, and obviously farfetched, it seems somehow plausible. Perhaps because he never breaks character, or because he includes just enough details from the non-fictional world we all live in to tie it together, or because, if only things in it WERE true, they would explain the unexplainable in some way (where DO you go, if you are in a coma, for instance?). Although I think part of it is - someone ought to coin a new phrase for this - but some novels just have a way of getting it right, of seeming like a dream you might have had yourself. Tapping into the collective unconscious? I'm going to lose people here, with my half-formed theories, but you don't have to examine why a book works to know that it does. Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    Proving that King still has the story-telling ability that made him famous.
  • (2/5)
    I couldn't finish it, again... started the book when it came out couldn't finish it. Borrowed the audiobook and same story, I got bored and I decided to stop listening.
  • (5/5)
    A truly dark romance that is thrilling from beginning to end. I've read this book more times than I can count and will probably read it over that many times more. I also highly recommend listening to the audiobook. Mare Winningham's voice is just perfect for reading this story out loud.
  • (2/5)
    This book was a long time in the reading(listening). It was fairly depressing from beginning to end, with the only bright spots being the descriptions of daytime Boo'ya Moon and the Pool. Otherwise, the lives of Scott, Lisey, her sisters, and his family were just gloom on top of gloom. It was very much a story about how to cope with gloom and darkness in our lives, and I'm okay with that, I'm just going to need to move on to something much more cheery.

    At some point in the middle of the story, Dustin commented that there's really "no editor in the world who can tell Steven King what to do, anymore, is there?" and I agreed with him. Stretches of the story seemed to drag on and on, full of needless or repetitive detail. This became funny when, in the author's note, King soulfully protests against this accusation, nearly word-for-word. So if his first draft got as much editing as he claims, I'm profoundly grateful to his editor and hope she keeps up the good work. :p

    PS: My 2 stars truly do mean "it was okay." I feel very "meh" about it in the end.
  • (2/5)
    This book has a lot of 'king-er-isms:" Parenthesized italic sentences in the(read between the line things)middle of paragraphs, quotes in the front of sections that sort of but not exactly hint what is to come, extreme wordiness that usually annoys me but doesn't with King, and some scary moments. However, I never became interested in the plot or characters. For me, that usually doesn't happen with King's books.
  • (1/5)
    My First book of Stephen King's and something convinced me not to go ahead and finish the book. May be I am used to clearer narration style. I didn't really like Lisey's character sketch. One word : Boring. I couldn't really go ahead reading the book! No offense Mr. King. I am not really comfortable with the way you write.
  • (1/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    Useless version - this version of the audio book has only two of the originally 19 hours which makes it basically impossible to understand the story at all. Why one would do such a thing is beyond me.
    But for the interview at the end this is a complete waste of time, don't listen to this version

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich