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On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Stephen King


On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Stephen King

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (387 Bewertungen)
Länge:
9 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Oct 1, 2000
ISBN:
9780743563376
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

"If you don't have the time to read, you don't have the time or the tools to write."

Here is Stephen King's master class on his craft.
On Writing begins with a mesmerizing account of King's childhood and his early focus on writing to tell a story. A series of vivid memories from adolescence, college, and the struggling years that led up to his first novel, Carrie, offer a fresh and often funny perspective on the formation of a writer.
King then turns to the tools of his trade, examining crucial aspects of the wriiter's art and life, offering practical and inspiring advice on everything from plot and character development to work habits and rejection.
King was in the middle of writing this book when he was nearly killed in a widely reported accident. On Writing culminates with a profoundly moving account of how his need to write spurred him toward recovery, and brought him back to his life.
Freigegeben:
Oct 1, 2000
ISBN:
9780743563376
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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Was die anderen über On Writing denken

4.5
387 Bewertungen / 285 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    I'm a big fan of Stephen King, but even if I weren't, I'd still love this book.
  • (4/5)
    Absolutely excellent. He's an intuitive writer, and I need more structure. But I loved peeking into his mind and writing process.
  • (3/5)
    I've only read King's Everything's Eventual because I found the few novels I started to be too verbose; they didn't grab my attention in time so I cast them aside. I thought this book would be the same way. The beginning is a little slow going, starting with blips of his childhood that don't really provide an emotional connection. (I did like that the scenes of getting his eardrums punctured reminded me of Roald Dahl's "surgeries" in Boy). Once he got into his experiences with writing, however, I was more interested. I still found the writing to be a little clunky, ironically, and it was hard to relate to some parts that seemed to deal solely with science fiction. It was a good read though, and there were some good tips, some good lines. My favorites:
    - " Description begins in the writer's imagination, but should finish in the reader's. When it comes to actually pulling this off, the writer is much more fortunate than the filmmaker, who is almost always doomed to show too much."
    - "Writing is magic, as much the water of life as any other creative art. The water is free. So drink. Drink and be filled up."
  • (5/5)
    Excellent!Not only an excellent book full of ideas for writers, but a fascinating look at Steven King's life.
  • (5/5)
    This is the book that started me into writing. I owe Stephen a debt of gratitude in that regard as without his advice, I would not have become a writer.

    It has two parts. One part biography of Stephen Kings life, one part his approach to writing. Both parts, make for an exceptional read and a very interesting look into this writers methods, but also his influences, life and career.

    If you want to start writing properly, buy this book and read it cover to cover. It is, in my humble opinion, the best handbook of story writing out there. It is a toolkit and instruction manual of the highest order, as well as being very easy to read and understand. It will challenge you to write, and write properly.
  • (5/5)
    On Writing: A Memoir Of The Craft, Stephen King, 2000. I find it worth noting that Philip K. Dick’s Exegesis is huge, while his stories are compact. Stephen King’s work is the opposite; his novels are huge, while this book on his life as a writer is short. Both are inspiring. King covers all the obvious details of the mechanics, but does so with images that will not fade away like old school lessons. I am working on my ‘toolbox’ every day, trying to avoid ‘Zen similes’ and passive voice. Replacing adverbs with stronger verbs. The book I am working on, the story I have found like a fossil in the ground, as King describes his inspirations, includes a telepathic border collie. Very fitting I think, since King describes writing as telepathy.
  • (5/5)
    So Stephen King was my first writer; at 10 years old my mother wouldn't let me watch MTV but she certainly didn't care if I read "It" (although she did draw the line at "Gerald's Game"). King's books were the first I read with the slow movement up the consciousness-ladder that "holy shit I fucking love this." So King holds a special place for me. I don't like everything he's done but even the books I hate I still care about because when I was an awkward and ugly preteen girl Stephen King said through his words "hey there's worlds and worlds you can love and it'll be no one's business but yours and mine, friend."

    Which is why I'm mad it took me so long to read this book.

    I wrote before I knew what it meant. I wrote stories about lost dogs finding their way home, about cardboard-characterized children surviving hurricanes and earthquakes and volcanoes (I had a disaster-kink as a middle school-er); I wrote for the worlds I didn't have, the worlds I desperately needed. And King was always there beside me, not only a friend but a cheerleader "Hey look what you can do!" And though I'm nowhere near there yet, I'm on my way. And having finally sat down and read this book, I'm so happy, so very happy that King was my first writer, my first friend. What he says here is immensely useful and never condescending. It's not mystical and it's not business-like, it just is because for King--writing just is. And I'm so glad he shared this with us. He didn't have to but he did and I'm grateful. What a great way to start off the new year.
  • (5/5)
    I don't agree with King on everything, but this is still the best book on writing I've ever read.
  • (3/5)
    An interesting journey into the mind and life of a popular writer. The book is divided into a c.v. (early events that shaped him), tools for writing (his thoughts on various parts of a novel), and the accident that occurred while he was writing this book. He also gives an example of a first draft and second draft of one of his stories.
  • (5/5)
    A surprising wonderful memoir about the craft of writing.
  • (5/5)
    Did I learn how to write by reading this book? Not really, but this was an enjoyable book to read by one of my favorite authors of all time. I thought he did a great job of helping someone who was inclined to want to write with the mechanics of doing so. And letting people know that this is what works for him. My enjoyment of this book came a lot from the personal things involved. His history early, his accident (which really bothered me) and his list of books that he has read during this time period. So much personal information that made my like of this man stronger.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this book, more than I thought I would. I'd recommend it to anyone who's looking for a book about writing. It's not gospel, but it offers a lot of quality information. I'm sure plenty of it feel repeated (active not passive voice, to be a writer you must read). Take from it what works for you.

    It certainly contains a lot of autobiography along the way, the first section (C.V.) is entirely a memoir. But I liked that aspect, as someone who enjoys reading about other's stories. Even in the more writing oriented sections, there is still a trail of his memoir, but I think it stops it from feeling dry. If you want a straight writing guide, read 'The Elements of Style'.

    It's broken into 4 main parts: C.V., Toolbox, On Writing, and On Living. This is followed by an example of editing a first draft, and some recommended reading from Stephen King. Overall, it's a pretty easy read and certainly provides some solid advice for the early (or hobby) writer. He explains everything he covers in plain English.

    TL;DR: I learned from it and enjoyed it.
  • (5/5)
    I've had this book on my shelf for ages. I don't know why I didn't read it before now, but I'm glad to say, that for me, it lives up to the hype. There was more memoir in the book than I'd expected, but it all fits. It all shows his relationship with writing, its importance, its necessity in his life.You certainly don't need to be a horror writer to find this book useful. The advice can apply to any writing, and there is plenty to identify with.
  • (5/5)
    In its own way, this book is inspiring. Just knowing that Stephen King went through all the same things every beginning writer goes through can keep you going on bad days. Not all of his methods will work for every writer, but I can see the wisdom of them for some. You should find at least a few suggestions that will help you gain discipline and success.
  • (5/5)
    On Writing is a phenomenal book about the craft. While I've read many a book in my life, I've always struggled to think about what exactly makes a *great* book, what gives it that ability to grab you and drag you even deeper into its world.

    Stephen King lays out how you should go about crafting worlds and characters but doesn't get bogged down in the nitty gritty of it, rather he gives you the tools and broad strokes you'll need to get down to figuring out that for yourself. The beauty of his approach is that it applies to writers of any genre, not just horror or suspense that he is the master of.

    While I've just finished this book, I can see that over the coming years I'll come back again and again to learn more from it., with each read-through giving me something new to use and ponder on.

    This is most definitely one of the most essential tools in any writer's toolbox.
  • (5/5)
    Valuable, informative, funny, inspiring.
  • (5/5)
    I've read this book so many times. I'm not sure whether the tips draw me in or Stephen talking about his thought processes behind some of his books. Either way, a fantastic read for anyone who would like insight into how a writer thinks.
  • (3/5)
    King is a natural writer, and it shows in his writing advice. The book makes it seem like genius flows effortlessly off the tip of his pen, and it makes me jealous as hell. Sigh.
  • (4/5)
    On Writing is a page-turner. Once I was in to it, I couldn't put it down. I recall a few Stephen King stories, but I have only ever seen the movie versions. Many of these I have not liked, especially the B-grade versions. Yet most of his stories are familiar, and many of the movies I have enjoyed were Stephen King stories - but I didn't know. The book ends quite abruptly, but King's personal story hasn't ended so why should his book? King shares some of his writing and his edits. This is something readers are rarely privy to, unless it is by accident. Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon was my first glimpse into the mind of a genius. King is less the myth and more the real thing. Writing is a job, writing is hard work, writing is a story unto itself. The process is vivid: 2nd Draft = 1st Draft - 10%; kill your adverbs verily. Booze and drugs are bullshit. These were the key lessons for me. The first two I learnt from Hemingway; the third exposes Hemingway's ability to portray the false and make it believable. Here, King delivers Fitzgerald's On Booze, and Hemingway would not be impressed. Yet it is the lived experience and King's work deserves the jacket-spiel "a one-of-a-kind classic".
  • (5/5)
    I'm sure some readers are disappointed at not getting more writing tricks and tips out of this book, but it is still a must-read for writers and Stephen King fans. The straight memoir segments are interesting in their own right as memoir, as well as for their insight into how a successful writer got to where he is now. As a writer who finds erotic &/or dark scenes cropping up in her fiction unbidden, I appreciated Stephen King's remarks about writing 'difficult' material. And, I wish we had more magazines around that were accepting stories, the way the writing world was when King started publishing his stories. I'm sure if you poke today's market with a stick often enough you'll find similar opportunities are out there, but I am still always jealous when reading about how King, Bradbury, and other older authors got their early stories published.
  • (4/5)
    Fascinating book from one of the world's most readable writers. I learned some things, and confirmed much. Read a lot. Write a lot. Beware adverbs. The sections on King's early development is really interesting and more than a little exciting. A later story of being the victim in a car accident is graphic. And the bonus consists of two long lists of recommended reading. It will be interesting to see how my likes line up with the great Stephen King.
  • (5/5)
    Tara Moss reminded me! Stephen King is the author who made me believe I could write! I recommend 'On Writing' to any aspiring writer. Truly inspirational, no matter what genre, lit, NF you write in.
  • (5/5)
    I'm a huge fan of Stephen King and have dabbled in creative writing in the past, so I found this book particularly fascinating. I love the stories about how he first started writing, and the advice for writers is genuinely useful and easy to understand - it's always worth listening to someone who has sold a gazillion (probably) books since the 1970s! I would recommend this book to anyone who is similarly a King fan and would like some tips on how to improve your writing.
  • (4/5)
    Great fun to read, no nonsense approach to the craft (rather than art) of writing, told with great sense of humor. I would agree with at least 90% of what King says while the remaining 10% might hold for suspense novels but less for other types. The first part is a type of autobiography, touching on such subjects as the authors alcohol and drug addictions. "We all look pretty much the same when we're puking in the gutter." The
  • (3/5)
    I don't have much to compare to (thus uncertainty on whether to give it 4 or 5 stars--as if I had any idea), but I thought it was good. There were a number of points I hadn't considered that, when I'd done so, showed wide means/opportunity for improvement in my beginner's attempt at writing. (e.g. to put emphasis on people and situations even in the midst of an ambitious, overaching plot)

    On an overall/practical level, it's worth noting that about half the book is basically just a narrative of Stephen King's life (mostly the earlier days). It's interesting and fun to read, but you could actually skip the first many pages, before he comes to laying out his writing approach and suggestions.

    Hmmm.
  • (5/5)
    Stephen King's On Writing shines as both an affecting memoir of his career as an author, and a collection of inspiring advice (indeed a very useful toolkit) on the art of writing. King, a master storyteller, here shows a deft hand for non-fiction too, with a well-crafted book that will satisfy equally the ardent fans of his novels and the aspiring writers.
  • (4/5)
    This is an excellent mix of memoir and writing advice (I mean, the title basically says that, but whatever, I'm just reinforcing that, ok?) I enjoyed the writing segments more, though snippets from King's childhood and life were still interesting to me. There's even a chapter at the end about his accident, which occurred when this book was partly finished (which I didn't recall - I have read this book but it was years and years ago.) My copy is studded with colorful flags highlighting helpful tips and approaches to writing. I enjoy his sense of humor, relaxed tone and no bullshit attitude (as well as his occasional foul language). Even if you're not interested in becoming a writer, if you're a fan of Stephen King's work, I think you'll enjoy his memories about his past and insight into how he crafts his books.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful and inspiring to just do it! I loved listening to King read this himself, enjoyed hearing about his life and his tips and advice on writing. While I haven't been a super fan of his writing, it's not generally in my preferred genres though I have read some, I am a fan of him, and have enjoyed listening to interviews and following him on Facebook, Molly AKA the thing of evil is adorable! I have always been aware of his work and consider him a major influence and icon in the writing world during my lifetime, so it was interesting from a historical perspective to hear the timeline of his work, as it starts around the time I was born. Thanks so much for this book Mr. King, I loved it!
  • (4/5)
    Part memoir, part instruction manual, always readable. He tells it from his point of view, but stressed the need for good storytelling, no matter how you achieve it.
  • (3/5)
    Read the memoir part, skimmed the "writing tips". King's career is certainly remarkable, but that this book is often cited as the be-all-end-all of writing how-tos is a joke.It's great to read about the methods and techniques a successful author like him uses for continuous, high-quality output. It's nonsense though to presume that these methods work for everyone - unless, and unfortunately that's exactly what King does - they're presented as vague slogans or platitudes. Bold and simple eye-catchers that are a mixture of common sense (yes, everyone older than 5 should know that you get better at something when you do it regularly, that's not something specific to writers) and over-simplifications.Yes, I loathe him for his - admittedly often mis- and out-of-context quoted - sentence "The road to hell is paved with adverbs". This is exactly the kind of simplistic bullshit gets repeated like a gospel in every single English-speaking writing circle, and in measurements of harm it had done it comes right after Strunk & White's outdated and ridiculous condemnation of the passive voice.