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Run

Run

Geschrieben von Ann Patchett

Erzählt von Peter Francis James


Run

Geschrieben von Ann Patchett

Erzählt von Peter Francis James

Bewertungen:
4/5 (137 Bewertungen)
Länge:
9 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Sep 25, 2007
ISBN:
9780061554476
Format:
Hörbuch

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Auch als verfügbar...

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Beschreibung

Since their mother's death, Tip and Teddy Doyle have been raised by their loving, possessive and ambitious father. As the former Mayor of Boston, Bernard Doyle wants to see his sons in politics, a dream the boys have never shared. But when an argument in a blinding New England snowstorm inadvertently causes an accident that involves a stranger and her child, all Bernard Doyle cares about is his ability to keep his children, all his children, safe.

Set over a period of 24 hours, Run takes us from the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard to a home for retired Catholic priests in downtown Boston. It shows us how worlds of privilege and poverty can coexist only blocks apart from one another, and how family can include people you've never even met. As in her best selling novel Bel Canto, Ann Patchett illustrates the humanity that connects disparate lives, weaving several stories into one surprising and endlessly moving narrative. Suspenseful and stunningly executed, Run is ultimately a novel about secrets, duty, responsibility, and the lengths we will go to protect our children.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Sep 25, 2007
ISBN:
9780061554476
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

ANN PATCHETT is the author of seven novels, The Patron Saint of Liars, Taft, The Magician’s Assistant, Bel Canto, Run, State of Wonder, and Commonwealth. She was the editor of Best American Short Stories, 2006, and has written three books of nonfiction, Truth & Beauty, about her friendship with the writer, Lucy Grealy, What now? an expansion of her graduation address at Sarah Lawrence College, and, most recently, This is the Story of a Happy Marriage, a collection of essays.


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Was die anderen über Run denken

3.9
137 Bewertungen / 110 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    Senator Will Lee is encouraged to run for president but there are conspiracies to stop him.
  • (4/5)
    The Run is another strong novel from Stuart Woods. The repeat characters are well-drawn and the plot is filled with twists and turns.Any fan of Woods or of political thrillers in general will enjoy this addition to the Will Lee series.
  • (4/5)
    Great story, even for a non political scientist. Easy to read and kept my attention with multiple plot lines. Exciting constitutional thriller with a sickly POTUS and fore knowledge by some but not all. The plotlet with the Hollywood starlet was a little annoying; she couldn't get our hero to do a non political act and finally slept with the Georgia Governor to make it happen...that was too Stone Barrington and not up to Will Lee standards. Additionally, there are some other small errors of research. There was sufficient character development so as not to be nauseatingly long. In the end, you knew that Will Lee would be elected. Wheres' book #6?
  • (4/5)
    Good entry in this interesting series. A good base cast of characters with some suitable villains support a lively plot.
  • (4/5)
    I am one of those readers who really appreciate Patchett's Bel Canto, except for the ending, so I was curious to see how I would react to this one. While not as absorbing a read for me, I can see how Patchett - by her own self confession - crafts different stories with a similar basis point: an event or situation occurs that brings a set of strangers together, and their lives change as a result. Patchett's characters are real, as are the situations in her stories and their interactions, although Kenya did come across to me as being wise beyond her mere 11-years, probably due to Patchett's admittance that she doesn't like to write child characters into her stories. The story flows so well that it is a bit of a mind-blow to realize that outside of the closing and some memory ramblings, the brunt of the story takes place over a very short, 24 hour period. This story is filled with everything: politics, religion, race, adoption, social class to family and community relationships. It almost felt as though Patchett was trying to cram too much in, so some of the author's message that the story is about matriarchal lines of a family gets a bit lost in the drama. While Bel Canto still remains my favorite Patchett read so far, this was a pretty darn good read, even though the American politics aspects were just so-so for me.
  • (4/5)
    Good book, engaging.
  • (4/5)
    Ann Patchett has a talent to draw yo into the lives of her characters and this is true in "Run." Teddy, Tip, Doyle, Kenya Fr. Sullivan, Tennessee are all fascinating characters in themselves but even more interesting is how she weaves their several stories together.
  • (2/5)
    Tip walks in to the path of an oncoming car. A woman pushes him out of the way, suffering injuries herself.Here begins a strange unravelling tale of a family, and what a family becomes.To be honest I couldn't really see the point of the story. It was disjointed, all to convenient and didn't really seem to get anywhere
  • (5/5)
    This was a lovely book. It is made up of so many emotionally wringing parts - family, parenthood, relationships between siblings, parent's desires for their children, the reality of loss, fulfilling one's own dreams versus the dreams of one's parents, the need to be politically involved, race relations, and even more.The story begins with the death of Bernadette, Doyle's wife. We learn than Doyle, a former mayor wants his two younger adopted sons, both black siblings who were taken into his white family, to make a career of politics. Neither Tip, the older one, wanted to do this because his love was ichthyology (the science of fishes) nor did Teddy, the younger son, because he wanted to go into the clergy. The story gets more complicated as we are introduced to Doyle's oldest son Sullivan and the birth mother of Tip and Teddy.One of the things I most loved about this book was the tenderness the characters felt for each other. I think every family has its stresses, and it is comforting to see these stresses resolved when family members work hard at it. My favorite chapter of this novel was the one in which Tennessee's dead friend comes to visit her in the hospital room. Those two had an especially lengthy and heartwarming conversation showing the depth of their friendship.Ann Patchet has really suprised me. I didn't much care for her first novel Bel Canto which almost put me to sleep reading it. I then beca,e very intrigued with her novel State of Wonder. Since reading Run, I've definitely become a fan of her work and look forward to reading more of her novels in the future.
  • (4/5)
    OK, I didn't think it was her best book. I never really got the picture of why all the characters were part of the story-line. Clever plot; and the race-issue was truly subtle as an under-current. #josephkingreview
  • (4/5)
    I find it hard to understand why this book has so divided Good Reads reviewers. If it is not their sort of book why on earth did they read it. I know I make the odd mistake, but that is normally when a writer I normally read produces a book out of left field. But this is a book by Ann Pratchett, author of the wonderful "Bel Canto" and you get what you should expect; wonderful writing about real lives. I really enjoyed this book which tells a story essentially within the bounds of the three unities, of time, place and action, that touched my heart. The characters are memorable and will stay with me. It tells us a lot about families and what shapes relationships within them. It tells us something about racial attitudes in the USA without preaching at us. But above all it tells us a story with all the skills that Ann Pratchett has in her formidable armoury. I wait, patiently but expectantly for "Commonwealth".
  • (3/5)
    I'm starting to believe Ann Patchett will never live up to what she achieved with Bel Canto. The quality of her writing in Run remains very good, but the plot suffers in some serious (to me) ways. Run is a good story about a family. When the story begins, we have Bernard Doyle, former mayor, fathering his three children. Sullivan, his mostly estranged biological son and two black brothers adopted as babies. Mrs. Doyle has died long ago, and the two younger boys are at University. There is a tragic car accident that reconfigures family relationships and dynamics. I was enjoying the story but ran into difficulties when a major plot element is revealed by an imagined conversation with a dead person. Also, the ending was disappointing in some aspects. Without spoiling anything, the way two of the brothers changed their lives was not realistic.
  • (4/5)
    Great book I enjoyed
    I recommend this book
    I like Ann's writing
  • (4/5)
    good reader. good story.kept having to return this to the library.
  • (2/5)
    Major meh. The character were so flat, in their boxes. The smart kid, the friendly kid, the mess-up. Took me forever to finish. I was really unimpressed.
  • (5/5)
    This is the third book by Ann Patchett that I've really enjoyed and yet I'm always reluctant to read her books since I hated Bel Canto so much. Thanks to someone dropping this off in my little free library I gave it a chance. The characters are so well-developed and there's a very strong plot, even though it all takes place in less than 24 hours. I recommend reading the author interview at the end.
  • (2/5)
    I had finally read Bel Canto last year, and I really wished I'd read it sooner. It was such an amazing work, and although I haven't gotten around to reading anything else by her yet, I got the chance to read this one pretty soon after it came out. I expected something if not as good as Bel Canto, at least comparable, but I was disappointed.
    It was a pretty quick read, but I found myself finishing the book just for the sake of finishing it. There was something about the pacing that bothered me that I can't quite put my finger on, and I think that Patchett is capable of showing human connections that run much deeper than they did in this novel. As another reviewer stated, it felt as though she was only scratching the surface of these characters - they didn't have nearly as much depth as they were capable of having.
    Overall, the story was an interesting one, and it has a lot of potential to be a great novel - it just doesn't quite get there.
  • (3/5)
    Interesting look at how circumstances throw people together. I like the unspoken, unknown bits that the readers learn but the characters don't know. The statue was also really interesting and made me want to have it... oh where or where can I get that statue?? Love the location, too Hello Boston!! Otherwise the characters were really disappointing to me. They were a little flat and perhaps too cliche. The ending disappointing as well - a little too predictable from someone who is good at surprises. Overall a decent read.
  • (3/5)
    I am going to have to reassess my stance on epilogues in books. Set This House in Order soured me on them for the nonce. Watership Down has one and that's okay, and Ann Patchett's wonderful Bel Canto has one and that's okay, but in this -- especially since the jacket touts that all the action is set within 24 hours -- and in the Ruff it feels like a convenience.
  • (5/5)
    Patchett is a fine writer. In this work she crams a lifetime of drama into, basically, one 24-hour period in the lives of a widowed father, his adopted sons and oldest, biological child, the mother of his adopted boys, and the daughter of that woman (who is a talented and precocious "little sister" to the boys).
  • (2/5)
    This book left me very flat. I am a steadfast fan of Patchett and her beautiful, fluid writing style, but this story was completely unbelievable to me.

    The adoption of two boys, the mother who never truly leaves them, the older brother with issues, the father who is good and yet vacant, and the young girl who runs like the wind. Too, too much going on here for one 24-hour period. Introductions to all, but no meat to any of it.

    Sullivan: What is the story on the Sullivan's stealing? What truly motivated him and how was he caught? How does he feel now? What is the sarcasm hiding, deep in his psyche?

    Teddy and Tip: They seem very well adjusted for two black boys adopted by the Irish family who turns out to be Boston royalty. And that sea-change at the end, only to go back again. Really? Are they that selfish?

    Tennessee and Kenya: Is it just me, or do these names reek of what Spike Lee would call "coonery"?

    The statue: We are introduced to a family dispute at the beginning to have it go nowhere. And the statue's ownership at the end surely must have caused some controversy...nothing.

    So much more could have been done with this 24-hour period. Instead of taking on all characters and painting a thin layer of each, I would have preferred a more compact story with greater detail. However, if you've seen Patchett interviewed about her books, you know enough to not criticize or ask for more detail without extracting some venom.

    If you like Patchett, read this so you will have her entire repertoire, but don't expect another Bel Canto.
  • (3/5)
    "Bernadette had been dead two weeks when her sisters showed up in Doyle's living room asking for the statue back. They had no legal claim to it, of course, she never would have though of leaving it to them, but the statue had been in their family for four generations, passing down a maternal line from mother to daughter, and it was their intention to hold with tradition."So begins what I thought was going to be a story of a Catholic family in Boston (yawn) but the statue turned out to be a small part of it. Two families attend a speech by Jesse Jackson one night as a snow storm is starting. When they leave the meeting, one boy doesn't realize he is walking into the street, into the path of an SUV, and is knocked out of his path by the mother of the other family. How these families are linked is the true story.Ex-mayor Bernard Doyle, father of Sullivan, adopted father of Tip and Teddy, and widower of Bernadette, has no idea how this woman is linked to his family, neither does the reader. We all eventually learn in flash backs that interrupt the present story.As Tennessee Moser lay in the street unconscious, her daughter, Kenya, shows how remarkable she is by gathering the belongings that were knocked off in the collision. Doyle hardly delays in sweeping her up as he takes his own son to the same hospital Tennessee is taken. Making this decision easier for him is the fact that the two adopted boys are black so it's not so unusual for him to take care of her. As we learn, there is much, much more to this story.At the upper level of chick lit, I am probably not the best audience for this book. I felt manipulated by the slow exposure of the facts always leaving questions unanswered but I did stay with it to the end. Should I be bothered that the whole truth wasn't revealed to the characters? Maybe not, but it left me with a feeling like an unscratched itch, a loose end not tied up.
  • (4/5)
    My first Ann Patchett book and I really enjoyed it!
  • (4/5)
    ***SPOILER ALERT!!*** While the plot of this novel had an interesting mix of good nuggets (racially mixed family, adoption & subsequent discovery of birth mother, mild amounts of politics & scandal, etc.), my overall feeling was "meh" after reading this story. I really wanted to know more about these characters, but it was almost like a teaser, and I never did feel like there was enough emotion expressed throughout a majority of the story. The writing was decent enough, but I wasn't grabbed by this one.
  • (2/5)
    I had high hopes for this book, after loving Bel Canto, but found it disappointingly mediocre.
  • (5/5)
    This was an excellent audiobook and the reader was superb. I'm not sure how he managed to switch from female to male, from the accented English of a black boy to the accented English of an old Irish priest to the accented English of an East Indian doctor but he did.The Doyles of Boston had one son but wanted more and Bernadette Doyle couldn't have them. So they decided to adopt and got a black baby who they were thrilled with. They were even more thrilled when the birth mother offered to give up her 14 month old son to them. So Tip and Teddy became Doyles but before they were very old Bernadette died and Bernard Doyle was left with 3 sons to raise on his own. He did this while serving as mayor of Boston and he tried to influence his 3 sons to become politicians. He hasn't been very successful but he still tries. He talks Tip and Teddy into joining him at a Jesse Jackson lecture and then he wants them to go to a party with him. Tip, a budding ichthyologist, wants to get back to the lab and he argues with his father. It is snowing heavily which may explain why he didn't see the SUV; at the last minute he was knocked out of the way by a black woman. Tip's ankle was broken but Tennessee Moser, the woman who knocked him out of the way, suffered a broken hip and other injuries. Her daughter, Kenya, saw it all happen and is devastated. At the hospital that both Tip and Tennesse were taken to Kenya talks to Teddy who is concerned about what will happen to her. Finally Kenya divulges that Tennesse is Tip and Teddy's birth mother so Bernard, Teddy and Tip decide to take her home with them.Kenya is a delight but Tip and Teddy aren't quite sure what to make of this unexpected discovery of family. Waiting for them at home is another family member, Sullivan Doyle, the oldest son who has just returned from aid work in Africa. Over a short period of time relationships are developed and grow and, to some extent, deteriorate. I suspect that listening to this book was the right choice because the reader's nuanced delivery added so much to the story.
  • (3/5)
    This is a slice of life drama about a mixed race family - the two young men, Tip and Teddy, are great characters, and the young girl, Kenya, is also a very attractive voice in the novel. I did think Sullivan was wasted though, and he should have had a much greater part in the story. I would read a whole novel about him.In terms of the plot, not a great deal happens, and there's an awful lot of introspection concerning the events around a couple of days or so. It felt very raggedy and was certainly distinctly unfinished by the time I got to the end. A rather unsatisfying read then.
  • (4/5)
    It's interesting to see the rating for this book; except for a few, most men didn't like the book and most women liked it. I guess this non-statistical analysis of mine makes me a woman?

    Run is a family drama. There are key issues (race, class, religion) that are dealt with without subtlety, i.e. in a way that makes most Americans uncomfortable. The conversations within the family are intellectual and often sarcastic, as could be expected from an upper class family where family members are acutely aware of issues of class and race. In this sense, Boston is a good setting for the book; I did think that Baltimore would be a good setting as well, but the race/class stuff within the context of Cambridge intellectualism works perfectly. The book is a bit reductionist, but Patchett's storytelling is unwavering. Language is also a constant strength of the novel.

    Perhaps the problem with Run is that when people are told that it is a book about politics, they expect it to resolve political issues. Perhaps there is too much hope in the end, which makes it seem a bit too optimistic. But I would conjecture that, perhaps, Patchett has expertly hidden the real pain and suffering in her novel in the friendship of two poor, black women.
  • (4/5)
    Not quite at the same level as Bel Canto, but still a very good book. Has more in common with The Patron Saint of Liars with its theme of family and what makes a family, and the different tugs and shifts in definition. The characters are very believable, and young Kenya is delightful.

    1st edition copy. Received as Christmas present from Joey
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed it—Patchett is such a great writer— but I didn't love it as much as I have her other books. The characters in this one seem a little too nice; their flaws don't tarnish them much. It's a good story, but even with the tragedies included, it feels a bit too sweet, and everyone ends up a bit too happy.