Finden Sie Ihren nächsten hörbuch Favoriten

Werden Sie noch heute Mitglied und hören Sie 30 Tage lang kostenlos
The Third Policeman

The Third Policeman

Geschrieben von Flann O'Brien

Erzählt von Jim Norton


The Third Policeman

Geschrieben von Flann O'Brien

Erzählt von Jim Norton

Bewertungen:
4/5 (126 Bewertungen)
Länge:
6 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 1, 2009
ISBN:
9789629546007
Format:
Hörbuch

Anmerkung des Herausgebers

Strange fiction...

Hilarious in its particulars but terrifying as a whole, this is one of the strangest works of fiction you'll ever encounter. I promise you'll never look at bicycles the same way again.

Beschreibung

Flann O’Brien’s most popular and surrealistic novel concerns an imaginary, hellish village police force and a local murder.

Weird, satirical, and very funny, its popularity has suddenly increased after the novel was featured in the hit television series Lost.

The series’ creators have said that anyone who has read the book “will have a lot more ammunition when dissecting plotlines” of the show. Here it comes to life in a new unabridged recording.

“Even with Ulysses and Finnegans Wake behind him, James Joyce might have been envious” wrote one critic about the work of Flann O’Brien.

© and (P)2007 Naxos Rights International

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 1, 2009
ISBN:
9789629546007
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Flann O’Brien is a pseudonym for Brian O’Nolan (1911–1966), an Irish novelist, playwright, and satirist. Born in Strabane, County Tyrone, he is regarded as a key figure in postmodern literature. His English language novels, such as At Swim-Two-Birds and The Third Policeman, were written under the pen name Flann O’Brien. His many satirical columns in the Irish Times and an Irish language novel An Béal Bocht were written under the name Myles na gCopaleen. O’Nolan’s novels have attracted a wide following for their bizarre humor and modernist metafiction.  


Ähnlich wie The Third Policeman

Ähnliche Hörbücher

Ähnliche Artikel


Rezensionen

Was die anderen über The Third Policeman denken

3.9
126 Bewertungen / 71 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    Very strange!
  • (4/5)
    Surreal, satirical funny tale
  • (4/5)
    What a strange, abstract tale, beautifully crafted, but one I find impossible to describe. Was it clever or crazy? I'm still not sure of that, but the Irish wit was simply glorious. I was delighted to hear old Irish words that until now I've only heard my grandmother use. My copy is an audiobook with outstanding narration by Jim Norton.
  • (4/5)
    Supremely absurd, but brilliantly witty.
  • (4/5)
    Overflowing with fine comic writing. It gets highly psychedelic at times. Something of a fusion of Kafka, Beckett and Alice in Wonderland.



    Pretty much the most plausible version of Hell I've read.
  • (4/5)
    it was worth a second round.
  • (5/5)
    A man of dubious morals and a wooden leg is convinced to join a robbery, which turns into a murder. He returns to the victim's house years later to recover a stolen cash box, and finds the victim, seemingly alive, in the house. Things get much stranger after that, involving two-dimensional police barracks, half-human bicycles, and a place where time does not go forward.This is the most bizarre book I have ever read. Everything is very funny at first, and then without fail goes to a very weird place. There are a series of references and footnotes about a nonexistent scientist named De Selby, who is completely wrong about everything, and whose ideas are being kept alive by a series of commentators. The execution is hilarious — All of De Selby's theories are complete nonsense, and the commentators explain them as lapses in judgement of the otherwise profound thinker. For example, De Selby thinks night is caused by 'black air.' All of this is very funny, enough so that the footnotes about De Selby that span many pages just add to the comedy. And then they start getting weird — the last few footnotes assert that De Selby couldn't tell the difference between men and women, and then imply that most of the commentators are in fact the same mentally unbalanced person publishing under different names. Which, if wikipedia is to be believed, is taken directly from the author's own life ("He allegedly would write letters to the Editor of The Irish Times complaining about his own articles published in that newspaper").On balance, it's a brilliant novel: I have read few things that are as funny, as horrible, as uncomfortable. And certainly nothing that was all three.
  • (4/5)
    I had figured out this was in the vein of Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, or The Man Who Was Thursday, but the ending was even neater than I anticipated. A fabulous piece of absurdism, both funny and unsettling, told in a dry and elliptical tone in a distinctly roundabout Irish way.
  • (4/5)
    I was originally attracted to this book after it was featured in an episode of Lost, where Jacob was reading it as J Locke was thrown out the window by his father. It took me a while to track down a copy of the book, and a while longer before I actually read it. The only other Irish author or book that I had read was Joyce's "Portrait of a Young Man..". I found the book quite readable, and would have been even more so had I skipped the footnotes. The plot was fairly easy to follow, as much as I understood. The quirky concepts like the sausage universe and the bicycle personification were quite entertaining. The copy that I read had some footnotes in it, which helped me to understand some parts. I still really don't understand the entire bicycle concept, but it will prob make more sense if I ever read it again. Bicycles were very common back when the story was originally written, and prob had a definitive role in life in Ireland at that time. I thought the representation of eternity was good also.
  • (2/5)
    Finding something 'too surreal' is probably a compliment, but this was a gruelling read. However, there were a few funny parts, mostly involving pancakes, and a neat ending to earn some credit. Reviews say Joyce would have been proud - now I'm even more afraid of Ulysses.
  • (4/5)
    The initially peculiar writing style, which put me in mind of Magnus Mills, grew on me to become a flashback of listening in as a child to Irish adult conversations not quite understanding but feeling strangely comforted in alienation. By the time a character used the word gawm to describe himself O'Brien had already drawn me deep into the colloquialism. This is an exaggerated world of a band of wooden legged men and half man half bicycle policemen, and yet there is a straightforward robbery and murder plot underpinning the strangeness. The story has moments of horror, comedy, and tenderness, and segments which exercise the mind with intriguing possibilities of what lies beyond our wordly perceptions of normality. The plot leaves plenty of scope to wander and wonder ahead the various twists and turns. The dreamlike quality of the narrative reflects a stream of unconciousness which becomes clear in a beautifully crafted finale. The book contains numerous footnotes which are undoubtedly clever in their seemingly important referencing of the works and experiences of a fictitious physician and intellectual, though at times these become a tediously distracting sideshow whilst allowing the author to run a parallel story written with a completely different style of prose.The Third Policeman is throughly entertaining work best read in your favoured rural Irish dialect.
  • (4/5)
    A surreal experience, this: as if Spike Milligan and Franz Kafka drafted an Alice in Wonderland for grownups, then handed it off to PKD and M Night Shyamalan for rewrites. The absurdist Irish whimsy humour and running gag about bicycles will either tickle you or they won't. There are a couple of genuinely creepy scenes (one near the start and one near the end), and a twist that will perhaps only partially satisfy a rationalist's desire to have the preceding events explained...
  • (2/5)
    2.5 starsIt didn't work for me. Every once in a while I'd find something good or funny. De Selby was definitely one of the best things about this book. But a lot of it read like a sillier/less good version of Beckett. I think it's important not to be self-satisfied with your humor, and reading this book, I felt like O'Brien thought he was being so funny, when in fact he's just pulling out whatever is the next weirdest thing that can happen and sticking it in his story. A lot of the humor seemed way too obvious, like he was trying too hard.
  • (5/5)
    My book club did it one month and most people didn't really like it. I loved it but it's not everyone's cup of tea.
  • (4/5)
    A book unlike any other. What begins as a the tale of two people breaking in to an old house in Ireland and committing a murder slides inexorably into a Daliesque nightmare of eluslve realities and pulsating time and space, populated with half-people, half-bicycle characters. This is one of the strangest journeys you'll go on and you'll soon decide whether it is one you wish to see through to the end or discard. The book oscillates between the sinister and farce but always stays on the far side of the bizarre line. Interestingly the book takes us on a circuitous route to leave us back where we started and comparisons with Joyce, Kafka and Beckett are inevitable but futile - like the works of those geniuses this is also an original.
  • (4/5)
    A good surreal, absurd yarn that boggles the mind and provokes it to engage. I'm very glad this was not the key to Lost!
  • (4/5)
    Creepy and wholly fantastic. Contains some of the more outrageous conversations I have ever read in a book.
  • (5/5)
    Everyone has a theory about this novel. There are at least four common kinds of explanations:1. Flann O'Brien is the forgotten postmodernist, the one who didn't leave Ireland. The "Third Policeman" is one of the last books Joyce read, and by implication the "Third Policeman" is a kind of Doppelgaenger to "Finnegans Wake." Its play with language and its reflexivity about the novel form is somehow parallel to Joyce's.2. Flann O'Brien was an alcoholic, and this is the product of so many unhappy binges and half-remembered delusions. The book is an indirect but eloquent record of that generation in Ireland, when the humor was desperate, when the church was all-powerful, when what's now called "homosocial" life in crowded dingy pubs had to stand in for wider society. 3. Flann O'Brien is a member of what Hugh Kenner called "Irish nihilism." There is no moral sense in the book, which after all begins with someone's head being crushed by a garden spade. This also supposedly explains the absence of contrition or any religious feeling. Denis Donoghue almost assents to this in his strange and covertly republican Afterword to the Dalkey Archive edition.4. Flann O'Brien is a minimalist, with deep ties to Beckett. This is one of the lines in Fintan O'Toole's 2009 review in the "New York Review of Books." The fact that these are all forced or unhelpful should probably indicate that the book is stranger than its commentators think. But the fact that people keep coming up with these one-line explanations shows how the novel keeps prodding its readers: it is just too strange to be accepted as a mid-century modernist novel, and for many readers a theory, no matter how artificial, helps soothe the discomfort. But what is the avant-garde, if it isn't a thing that is not anticipated? That can't be accommodated? That wasn't asked for, that solves no problem we ever thought we had?One thing I especially love about the "Third Policeman" is the sense of Irish landscape that it conjures, in between its many fantasies and concoctions. If you take away the hallucinated afterlife that occupies most of the book, what remains? A very poor, simple countryside, with farms and a few police stations and pubs, and miles of bumpy roads, sodden fields, muck, brambles, dripping copses, and gorse. There is almost nothing else: people ride bicycles everywhere. When they think they might become rich, they dream of changes of clothes. There is almost no mention of what they eat or drink. It is an impoverished landscape -- and in relation to it, O'Brien's perverse and perfervid inventions are even more desperate, more necessary, and more painful.
  • (3/5)
    This book operates on its own internal logic and is really hard to summarize as a result. In the beginning, the unnamed narrator - an orphan obsessed with the works of the (fictional) philosopher de Selby - is living with a man named Jack Divney who comes up with the idea of killing Old Mathers to fund the narrator's publishing of his critical work on said de Selby. They do so, and eventually Divney sends the narrator to Old Mathers' place to get the black box with money. In this cabin, he meets with Old Mathers, apparently alive again. From there, the oddities begin to pile up.Definitely the only book I've ever read that was made less comprehensible by looking up words I was unfamiliar with, _The Third Policeman_ is pretty bizarre and way outside of my reading comfort zone. I read it because of the references to it on the TV show "Lost," which is why I persevered to the end instead of stopping at page 30. That being said, I'm glad I pressed on because once I got to the end I completely reinterpreted the events of the story, and I thought what the author accomplishes with the story is interesting. Still, it's the sort of book you have to really think about and almost works better for a discussion or classroom than for pleasure reading.
  • (5/5)
    I adore this book. It is deeply cynical and very observant of Irish personalities and attitudes.
  • (5/5)
    Quite posibly the funniest novel ever written. Far superior to his AT SWIM TWO BIRDS which is far more well known.
  • (3/5)
    The Third Policeman is a philosophical satire with objects growing so small that they are invisible, men that become bicycles and bicycles that become men, dead men that speak their minds, and many more absurdities. Anything can be said in this place, and it would be true, and would have to be believed.--from The Third PolicemanEach absurdity and character is addresses and spoken about in a matter of fact way, so that despite the narrator's astonishment, it all seems almost ordinary in that that is the way in which the world works there. It reminds me of Through the Looking Glass in that the characters speak in logically illogical ways. Their theories are absurd to an outsider, but quite clear and self explainitory to them. The Third Policeman is therefore a highly intellectual rather than emotional work. The humor comes from wit and wordplay, not slapstick. So that you find your self drawn rather matter-of-factly into the mind bending philosophical puzzles rather than actually caring about the characters. It is interesting because the reader, like the narrator, is trying to understand, trying to make it all fit without paradox into their mind. I find it a great strain for me to believe what I see, and I am becoming afraid occasionally to look at somethings for fear they will have to be believed. --from The Third PolicemanI found myself feeling like I was missing something, not quite getting the joke. I wondered if there might not be some cultural context that I, as an Californian, was not privy to. Was the satire, like so many others, dependent upon the cultural references being made? I had no way of answering that, and since I was listening to it on audio book, I found myself allowing the absurdities to pleasantly wash over me without striving too hard for the meaning. I find myself wanting to approach it again, this time in print with the hopes that I might nail some of it down in my mind, though I doubt that will ever be entirely possible for me. Rather I think it will be a book I come to again and again, and find some new discovery in each time.
  • (5/5)
    This is the black stuff, all right - pure genius wrapped in a satire of an enigma of a riddle on a bicycle. Comedy writing at speed with the breaks off. A real pleasure.
  • (5/5)
    I read this a long long time ago and while so many books have fled from my mind, not this little beauty. Wildly imaginative, wildly witty, wildly brilliant, and deep as a Pookah's pocket. There's so much here, how does one even begin to review such a thing? The invention alone would take more space than allowed, boyo.
  • (3/5)
    Strange book. What if heaven involves repeating the same frustrating yet fitting sequence of events over and over in world where bicycles are alive?Flann O'Brien is supposed to be funny, but I would characterize this story as bizarre or odd rather than funny.
  • (4/5)
    I spent most of my time reading this book with my brow furrowed in a sort of "What the...?" expression, but that doesn't mean I didn't enjoy it. Those who like to imagine the look of a scene while reading will have a fiendish but delightful time trying to get their heads around some of the descriptions in this story, and the dialogue and premise are first-rate. Still, a difficult one to recommend for any who are not prepared for one of the more bizarre reads they may encounter.
  • (4/5)
    A novel I never get tired of. The stark insanity of Sergeant Pluck's lines ("Would it surprise you to learn that the Atomic Theory is at work in this parish?") continues to delight at every reading.For those who haven't: the (anti-)hero becomes trapped in a surreal and distorted version of his Irish village, where (as his soul, Joe, points out) "anything can be said and will be true and will have to be believed." The surreality is delightful, but so is the style. Here's the magnificent opening paragraph:"Not everybody knows how I killed old Phillip Mathers, smashing his jaw in with a spade; but first it is better to speak of my friendship with John Divney because it was he who first knocked old Mathers down by giving him a great blow in the neck with a special bicycle-pump which he manufactured himself out of a hollow iron bar. Divney was a strong civil man but he was lazy and idle-minded. He was personally responsible for the whole idea in the first place. It was he who told me to bring my spade. He was the one who gave the orders on the occasion and also the explanations when they were called for."
  • (5/5)
    I've worn out several copies of this just by reading it so often.
  • (4/5)
    I have read this books twice. I highy recomend it.
  • (5/5)
    Bizarro before Bizarro was a glimmer in your grandaddy's cataracts! Absurdist genius, this book floored me with its sleek wit, and mind bending humour. Subtle in its magnitude, and bizarrely profound too. Flann O'Brien is a master, without a doubt! Really good reading by Jim Norton, who adds vim and vigour with his selection of colourful Irish accents.