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Robinson Crusoe: Timeless Classics

Robinson Crusoe: Timeless Classics


Robinson Crusoe: Timeless Classics

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (91 Bewertungen)
Länge:
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
1. Jan. 2011
ISBN:
9781612475189
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Shipwrecked! A young Englishman finds himself stranded on a small island in the middle of nowhere. For 24 years he survives—and even thrives. How will his life change now that his island has a visitor?

Freigegeben:
1. Jan. 2011
ISBN:
9781612475189
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

English author Daniel Defoe was at times a trader, political activist, criminal, spy and writer, and is considered to be one of England’s first journalists. A prolific writer, Defoe is known to have used at least 198 pen names over the course of a career in which he produced more than five hundred written works. Defoe is best-known for his novels detailing the adventures of the castaway Robinson Crusoe, which helped establish and popularize the novel in eighteenth century England. In addition to Robinson Crusoe, Defoe penned other famous works including Captain Singleton, A Journal of the Plague Year, Captain Jack, Moll Flanders and Roxana. Defoe died in 1731.


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3.6
91 Bewertungen / 106 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    One of the best young adult books ever written. Deserted islands and shipwrecks started with Dafoe.
  • (4/5)
    My childhood library included an abridged version of Robinson Crusoe. It was one of my favorites, and I read it several times. When this unabridged version arrived from the Easton Press, I happily settled in to enjoy it again. I don't know what changed - my level of understanding, or the additional material not included in the version I had previously read - but I found the religious material to be slow going.
  • (3/5)
    Robinson Crusoe starts off whiney. And moany. And oh-woe-is-me, and why did I do that?

    This is spoiler-ish.

    Then he spends 20-odd years alone on a not-desert island. He learns to be alone--except for pets, and a parrot who he teaches to talk, and God. Because of course he finds God and starts studying the bible. It was all downhill from here.

    From whiney guy he becomes the King. Because of course a native man will be his servant! And of course his servan'ts father and the random Spanish guy will serve him too! And then he becomes the Governor, because of course those who survive a mutiny on their ship will want Robinson to be their boss! And hey, he'll just eave the Spanish behind!

    I was going to recommend this for a friend's 5th grade daughter--she reads like crazy, and would love the way he builds his life on the island. But then the servant bossy governor bits come in. Meh.
  • (5/5)
    Sure, it's not for everyone, but what book is? I've read it many times. It's a great book, especially after a tough week or month surrounded by traffic, computers, and smog. Then I just want to be Robinson on my own private island, building, inventing, and slowly going happily mad!

  • (1/5)
    Unreadable prose (37 semicolons in a single sentence!) and a self-satisfied narrator make for a very unlikeable book. Defoe was a sexist, racist, colonialist pig, and this book reflects little more than his own crazed view of the world. It's a useful historical document, of course.
  • (5/5)
    It's a classic; how could I not give it 5 stars. I was delighted to discover how very readable the book is despite the language of early 1700s. Also surprised that the two main themes of the book are mechanical and spiritual. Mechanical, in the sense that there is a lot of practical detail about how Crusoe creates a living from the bits and pieces he rescues from the wrecked ship. And spiritual, in his struggles to come to terms with life alone (until near the end) on an island (not desert, btw) and how considers his relationship with God under the circumstances. Doubtless one of today's editors would have asked for a rewrite to reduce the book in half, but the rambling detail is part of its classic charm. Read slowly and it's easy to be with Crusoe for a LONG time.
  • (3/5)
    Started out quite interesting - then made the mistake of reading the historical basis for the story before finishing (Selkirk's Island). With the illusion shattered, I couldn't get back to the adventure with any gusto. :(
  • (5/5)
    i so longed for my own deserted island after reading this
  • (4/5)
    Four stars on the strength of it's historical/classical significance...I read an abbreviated version as a young boy....enjoyed it much then...I thank I liked the adventure story of a very competent person...in this reading Defoe's religious themes were more in site...took a long time to get through.
  • (4/5)
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Its account of a man's industry and occasionally outright boredom in the face of trying circumstances is inspiring and classic.Honestly, if you dig too deep, there are a lot of uncomfortable themes about race, gender, and religion that might tarnish any fond childhood memories you have (I recommend the excellent essay "Robinson Crusoe and the Ethnic Sidekick").To summarize, it's about a man who uses and possesses everything and everyone he sees. You can draw a lot of conclusions about sexism, white supremacy, and capitalism and you really wouldn't be too far off base.While it's good to keep this in mind, you should also keep in mind that it's over three hundred years old. Not that this makes any of the enclosed sentiments any less awful, but the prevailing ideas of the time should at least be taken into account.
  • (4/5)


    Fascinating book both for its detailed subject matter and its insight into the mindset and culture of the late 17th and early 18th centuries.
  • (2/5)
    he waited 20-something years to meet Friday. the first teo chapters were packed with action and then he was alone on his island. turns out that u need at least two people in a story and to create conflict so that part was just slow for me to read. the last three chapters are packed again with lots of actions and people on the island.
  • (3/5)
    2008, Blackstone Audiobooks, Read by John LeeI’ve been wanting to read this classic, first published in 1719, for some time. It is in [1001 Books] and it is widely acknowledged at the first English novel. Defoe presents readers with a fascinating scenario: the prolonged and intense solitude of Robinson Crusoe, shipwrecked on a deserted island. Crusoe’s grappling with his new existence is captivating. First, of course, he needs to learn how he will feed himself; but in time he develops a relationship with the natural world of the island which allows him not only to survive but to fashion a quite comfortable, if solitary, existence. And he develops a personal connection to God that is both rich and rewarding, where before his mishap, he had none. Crusoe’s encounters with the native islanders date the publication in terms of master/slave relations with the savages – and and I found it difficult not to squirm, reading from my twenty-first century chair (what’s more, I could not but notice that such relations are left absent from the most recent re-telling of Robinson Crusoe, the 2000 film Castaway.Good read. Not one I will revisit, but one that is certainly worthwhile.
  • (3/5)
    The storyline of this novel is intriguing enough, but since the medium was so new, Defoe's writing leaves much to be desires. Crusoe's constant listing and mood swings are hard to get through after a while.
  • (4/5)
    Started rereading this as a refresher before I pick up Foe - and wow, is it a different book now. When I was a kid, I read this at the crux between my nautical fiction craze and my self-sufficiency craze, so naturally the seagoing and the invention with which Crusoe builds his encampment interested me most. This time around, though, I'm fascinated by his descriptions of living with and without fear of different varieties, and by what is middle-class and middle-aged about those fears. Very different. Hm.
  • (4/5)
    I didn't think I really needed to read this book. After all the plot line is pretty well known and the survival story of being stuck on a desert island has been repeated in many other books as well as used multiple times in Hollywood blockbusters. And somehow I was under the impression that when Crusoe discovers another human being on this island the phrase 'Thank God it's Friday' was uttered and became a standard phrase to express the end of a long week as well as a chain restaurant (that last part I don't think is true, or at least I missed the line when reading the book).

    But this book is definitely worth reading. It is the original castaway story and I found it easy to read, very exciting, and was surprised to realize that many of my assumptions about the story were wrong. I loved the ingenuity that Crusoe employed in surviving from capturing and taming wild goats to devising methods of shelter. But the biggest surprise was the inner dialog and philosophy scattered throughout the book. Crusoe was one of the earliest practitioners of keeping a gratitude journal. Rather than moaning and complaining about being stuck on an island and the only survivor, he was grateful for the few good things he had.

    The book definitely exhibits some pretty strong racial prejudices. Although it would not be acceptable today, it seemed to reflect the time that it was written.

    Surprisingly good book to read!
  • (2/5)
    This is one of those books that is normally read in childhood that I just never got around to, that being said, I'm not sorry I skipped it as a child. I can't believe this book is considered a children's classic. It promotes slavery as a way of life, discusses lifestyles of cannibals, and overly promotes religion. I could over look all of those things given that the book was written in 1719, and would have been common conceptions, but seriously, this is the stuff of my childhood nightmares.

    The author has Crusoe killing cats to keep the population down, drowning kittens, enslaving a man that he was obliged to save. It wont give me nightmares... But I can't say I've enjoyed this book.
  • (4/5)
    I may be the only person who has read two books by Daniel Defoe, neither of them Robinson Crusoe or Moll Flanders. Decided to finally remedy that. It may be heretical to say, but Robinson Crusoe feels more like a historical curiosity than a great novel. If the Odyssey or Bleak House were published for the first time today they would be considered masterpieces. If Robinson Crusoe were published today one would think the action was somewhat lame, the character's psychology implausible, and the novel lacking in a coherent structure, especially as manifested by the ending, not to mention the books racism and imperialism.

    That said, it as a very worthwhile historical curiosity and it is hard to imagine it not having been written and it is generally enjoyable to read,. The first quarter is a series of adventures culminating in Crusoe being stranded on an uninhabited island in the Caribbean. The last quarter is another series of adventures, not just his escape but -- oddly continuing to adventures like being attacked by wolves while traveling overland from Portugal to Northern France.,

    The middle half of the book is the timeless story of Crusoe's 27 years on the island, starting with his meticulous efforts to save as much as possible from the ship and continuing through his becoming increasingly productive through agriculture and livestock rearing, much of it described in minute and fascinating detail. Crusoe himself, however, is a stock character who has no psychological depth, no depth of emotion about his situation, and often has attitudes that seem implausible for someone stranded alone for more than twenty years.
  • (2/5)
    “It is never too late to be wise.” No doubt like many others I knew this story from its techni-colour reincarnations but had actually never read the original so had no idea how Robinson Crusoe got to the island or even off it. As such felt that it was time that I put that right even if it was tough to get those versions out of my mind.This book was originally published nearly 300 years ago in 1719 and is regarded as one of the first English novels, its even based on a true story but unfortunately for me it is showing the signs of age.The book explores many issues including religion and colonialism and it was interesting that the first word that Crusoe teaches Friday is 'master' but the book is so top heavy with all the action being either at the beginning or the very end with little happening in between and despite living on the island for over 20 years on his own Crusoe never fully explored it which seems a bit of a stretch to put it mildly. It also seems amazing that the island was not visited by another human being for 20+ years given the ending when it seemed to suddenly appear on the tourist must to list.On the whole I enjoyed the beginning and the end where it felt like a boy's own tale yet found the middle ponderous and disappointing which has affected my general opinion overall.
  • (3/5)
    In my eyes the only thing remarkable about this tale is the notion that it is purportedly one of the first English novels. It is an adventure story set in the 1600s about Englishman Robinson Crusoe's experiences as a sailor and his survival alone on an uninhabited island after surviving a ship wreck. While I found portions of the story captivating, too much of it is burdened with excrutiatingly detailed passages of Crusoe's life on the island. I learned some practical things about survival, and I found notable the themes of self preservation, human perseverence, and resourcefulness. It would be unfair to condemn the book too harshly for being a product of its time, which includes all the nastiness of European imperialism and the arrogance and prejudices that came with it, but I found the attitude toward the "savages" (oh, that would be the natives of South America) difficult to suffer and remain on the side of the story's protagonist. Defoe would have best served the novel had he omitted the detailed chapters that chronicled Crusoe's return journey through the Continent and instead concluded simply with his return to England.Overall the novel is inconsistent in its pace and bores the reader with trivialities. The notion that Crusoe found a newfound faith in God on the island and proceeded directly thereafter to so gracelessly enslave a native isn't so much surprising as it is inadvertantly satirical.Three stars only because of the historical significance of this, one of the first, novels in the English language. Otherwise, I would have given it two stars.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best young adult books ever written. Deserted islands and shipwrecks started with Dafoe.
  • (4/5)
    In "Robinson Crusoe", Robinson disobeys his father's wishes and goes with the sea. The boat is shipwrecked and he is the only one who survives. He makes a home on an island, which is surprisingly beast free. Robinson raises goats for meat and company. He also goes out frequently to get grapes for raisins. Cannibals from another island capture a merchant ship and come over to his island for the sacrifice. Robinson is able to rescue the sailors and get them to take him back to a real home. This book was very descriptive. The plot was somewhat predictable. I would recommend this book. This book seems like someone actually wrote this on an island. It was very real. Some places in the book were boring because everyday did not have action. Overall, I would not like to read this book again.
  • (4/5)
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book, which is obviously a must read for any fan of classic literature.Defoe's writing style is generally quite user friendly given he wrote in the early 1700s. On one level, Robinson Crusoe is a compelling story about what one man must do to survive without the most basic of necessities. It is a testament to the human spirit in the face of adversity. On another level, the book concerns a common man's coming to religion and learning to appreciate what really in matters in life.My only reservation is that the final few chapters seemed out of character with the majority of the book, and in my opinion were unnecessary to the story.
  • (2/5)
    The story was interesting enough but not very realistic. Crusoe was a very shallow-minded British man who was able not only to survive nearly three decades alone on an island but teach himself all manner skilled trades, avoid being eaten by neighboring savages, acquire a faithful servant (slave), and raise a small fighting force against would-be pirates. He then is able to return back home to England with all the money he had saved (even though it had seemed useless to keep it for so long) and discovered that his business interests had been looked after in his absence with great success and he would now enjoy the fruits of someone else's labor; still with his slave in tow.
  • (3/5)
    I've been on a bit of a classic novel kick lately and this book may be the end of it for a little while. It was not bad, but there was a lot of potential in this novel that was left undeveloped. Robinson Crusoe is a story most know, the tale of a man stranded on a deserted island for years. While a fascinating story, I found Robinson Crusoe's interactions with the natives who sometime visited the island the most frustrating part of the tale. True to European stereotypes, these natives are cannibals. Furthermore, after rescuing one of their intended victims, a man who becomes his servant Friday, Robinson Crusoe proceeds to convert this man to Christianity. All in all, this classic novel tells one a great deal about the prejudices of the time it was written in.
  • (2/5)
    What an aggravating book. Chilling in its blithe acceptance of slavery and exploitation for personal gain, though of course this is not out of sync with the times in which it was written. Even put in context, though, it is hard to sympathize with this character beyond an admiration for his industry and compassion for anyone who is suffering, no matter how morally afflicted a fellow he may be. The racism is thick and irksome, from his descriptions of skin tone outward, and his "improvements" on the "savage" he saves and then dominates are of the sort justifiably decried in countless modern books on slavery, racism, and colonization.It is also astonishingly boring. I have a higher level of patience than most for characters noodling around doing nothing much of interest in order to set the scene, but egads. I am gobsmacked that this book is still published and recommended for children. It must be seriously rewritten in their versions. Yikes.
  • (3/5)
    Published in 1719 and certainly a classic adventure story, but its inconsistencies don’t stand up to much scrutiny, and it isn’t particularly well written. The main inspiration for the tale was the true story of Alexander Selkirk, who had been left for four years on an uninhabited island after arguing with his captain, then rescued, and his story told in 1712. Defoe expanded on this of course, among other things stranding Crusoe for 28 years, and having him meet ‘Friday’, an aboriginal who he then (ugh) made a servant and converted to the ‘True God’. Friday is not treated as a person, he’s more like other ‘material’ Crusoe finds, but this was par for the course at this time in history.Aside from the adventure story, Defoe was exploring man’s nature and his reaction to adversity, topics larger than the story itself. In one scene, Crusoe lists ‘evil’ aspects to his condition (‘I am cast upon a horrible desolate island, void of all hope of recovery’), and corresponding good aspects (‘But I am alive, and not drown’d as all my ship’s company was’). I don’t think there was anything particularly insightful here, though the struggle for survival and events like finding the footprint are iconic and lasting images.Quotes:On accepting fate:“I learned to look more upon the bright side of my condition, and less upon the dark side, and to consider what I enjoyed, rather than what I wanted; and this gave me sometimes such secret comforts, that I cannot express them; and which I take notice of here, to put those discontented people in mind of it, who cannot enjoy comfortably what God has given them; because they see and covet something that He has not given them. All our discontents about what we want appeared to me to spring from the want of thankfulness for what we have.”And:“These reflections made me very sensible of the goodness of Providence to me, and very thankful for my present condition, with all its hardships and misfortunes; and this part also I cannot but recommend to the reflection of those who are apt in their misery to say, “Is there any affliction like mine!” Let them consider how much worse the cases of some people are, and their case might have been, if Providence had thought fit.”On money:“He told me that it was for men of desperate fortunes on one hand, or of aspiring, superior fortune on the other, who went abroad upon adventures, to rise by enterprise, and make themselves famous in undertakings of a nature out of the common road; that these things were all either too far above me, or too far below me; that mine was the middle state, or what might be called the upper station of low life, which he had found by long experience was the best state in the world, the most suited to human happiness, not exposed to the miseries and hardships, the labor and sufferings of the mechanic part of mankind, and not embarrassed with the pride, luxury, ambition, and envy of the upper part of mankind.”On religion:“I had rather be delivered up to the savages, and be devoured alive, than fall into the merciless claws of the priests, and be carried into the Inquisition.”On youth:“...how incongruous and irrational the common temper of mankind is, especially of youth, to that reason which ought to guide them in such cases, viz. that they are not ashamed to sin, and yet are ashamed to repent; not ashamed for the action for which they ought justly to be esteemed fools, but are ashamed of returning, which only can make them be esteemed wise men.”
  • (5/5)
    For Christmas, I ordered an mp3 player (Library of Classics) that was pre-loaded with 100 works of classic literature in an audio format. Each work is in the public domain and is read by amateurs, so the quality of the presentation is hit or miss. This was the third novel I’ve completed (the first two being A Tale of Two Cities and Around the World in 80 Days) and like the first two, the reader did not detract from the experience, and was in fact quite good.Robinson Crusoe was written in the 17th century by Daniel DeFoe and is one of the oldest novels written in the English language. Despite this, it is not difficult to read (or listen to) in the least. While there are a few affectations and instances of unfamiliar “period” language and references, I never found this to be a problem.The story is well known; an English mariner becomes shipwrecked and stranded on a desert island for many years, ultimately joined by his man Friday (a local native). The novel however, begins far sooner and spends some time detailing Crusoe’s early life and adventures. A good 75% of the story, however, takes place on the island, located off the coast of South America near the mouth of the Orinoco River.Luckily, Crusoe is not completely without provisions or means of survival and the “eight and twenty” years he spends on the island are filled with his ingenuity and seemingly never ending industry in making his abode not only livable but comfortably so. This is very much a period piece with religion playing a not insignificant role, though not overbearingly so. It is, more than anything, quite entertaining and even enlightening. I must confess being somewhat pleasantly surprised that such an old work played so well in current times.
  • (5/5)
    There's so much more in this novel than has come into the culture. It's essentially about sin and slavery. So Crusoe disobeys his father and is cast into slavery. After he escapes he sets about enslaving others and is cast away on the island, into a sort of slavery to himself, where he can never do anything for anyone else. And for all that he takes to God, he can never be tested. Whatever his character faults, when he gets company he does take command with their agreement and it's only then that he can escape. Clever stuff, and it's also an exciting adventure story.
  • (4/5)
    One of my favorite classics as a child - I suppose because I felt so isolated back then. Defoe shows us that we are all victims of a shipwreck - stranded in the middle of the ocean called life. Faced with the struggle of Man against Nature, most of us would not cope as well as Defoe's hero.