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Blonde

Blonde

Geschrieben von Joyce Carol Oates

Erzählt von Jayne Atkinson


Blonde

Geschrieben von Joyce Carol Oates

Erzählt von Jayne Atkinson

Bewertungen:
4/5 (41 Bewertungen)
Länge:
8 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Sep 21, 2004
ISBN:
9780060794002
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

She was an all-American girl who became a legend of unparalleled stature. She inspired the adoration of millions, and her life has beguiled generations of fans and fellow artists. The story of Norma Jeane Baker, better known by her studio name, Marilyn Monroe, has been dissected for more than three decades, but never has it been captured in a narrative as breathtaking and transforming as Blonde.

In her most ambitious work to date, Joyce Carol Oates, one of America's most distinguished writers, re-imagines the inner, poetic, and spiritual life of Norma Jeane Baker, the child, the woman, the fated celebrity, and tells the story in Norma Jeane's own voice: startling, rich, and shattering.

Drawing on biographical and historical sources, Joyce Carol Oates evokes the distinct consciousness of the woman and the unsparing reflection of the myth, writing as she has never written before, ecstatic, completely absorbed, inhabited as if by the spirit of her extraordinary subject. Rich with psychological insight and disturbing irony, this mesmerizing narrative illumines Norma Jeane's lonely childhood, wrenching adolescence, and the creation of Marilyn Monroe.

With fresh insights into the heart of a celebrity culture hypnotized by its own myths, Blonde is a sweeping novel about the elusive magic of a woman, the lasting legacy of a star, and the heartbreak behind the creation of the most evocative icon of the 20th century.

A HarperAudio production.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Sep 21, 2004
ISBN:
9780060794002
Format:
Hörbuch


Über den Autor

Joyce Carol Oates is the author of over seventy books encompassing novels, poetry, criticism, story collections, plays, and essays. Her novel Them won the National Book Award in Fiction in 1970. Oates has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters for more than three decades and currently holds the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professorship at Princeton University.   

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Was die anderen über Blonde denken

3.9
41 Bewertungen / 22 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    Captivating, although we all know the sad ending. Biographical but with fictitious parts ... but which parts?
  • (5/5)
    A stunning, dream-like evocation of the life of Norma Jean & her creation: Marilyn Monroe. Based on extensive research, Oates gives a fictionalised imagining of Marilyn, from unloved & abused child onwards. Oates’s writing creates the inward world of Marilyn & at the same time the various affects she had on others. And, 700 odd pages later, I know much more about the life of the troubled, luminous star but she still remains a fascinating enigma.
  • (5/5)
    What an amazing book! It illustrates to me what an artist's work is, at its core. Joyce Carol Oates started with the facts of Norma Jean Baker's life and in the crucible of her imagination created a great work of fiction in which she imagined what it would have been like to live her strange life -- in which Marilyn Monroe was but one of many characters. I loved it for so many reasons...primarily for the multi-faceted and fascinating character she created. The icon we know as Marilyn Monroe became a real person on the pages of this book, someone driven, brilliant, insecure, mystical, disciplined, helpless and a victim of her own beauty. It also is a wonderful snapshot of America in the 50's and early 60's, capturing both the frightening politics of the McCarthy era and a time when women had not yet begun to liberate themselves. Was this really only 50 years ago? While Norma Jean is the primary narrator, Oates also writes from the perspectives of other people in her life -- sometimes first person, sometimes third person -- and uses typography to help the reader figure out the shifts in narrator. She also includes fictional journal entries, including poem fragments, from the notebook Norma Jean kept throughout her life. This is a book I'm keeping, not lending, because I know I will want to read it again.
  • (3/5)
    Another book that I probably would not have read without the 1001 Books list, but I’m glad I did. This was my first Oates novel, and it was a chunkster. I really love the writing, and the fictionalized account of Marilyn Monroe’s life was engrossing. I fell into a rabbit hole of google searches trying to see what was real and what was fabricated. It’s really sad all the way through, but still a solid read. ⭐️⭐️⭐️1/2
  • (3/5)
    Though long, I found this book to be very readable and really quite entertaining.But.This is a fictionalized version--a VERY fictionalized version--of Norma Jeane Baker/Marilyn Monroe's life. Things that ARE known, like the fact that she did not live with her grandmother as a child (her grandmother died when Norma was younger), were changed by Oates. Why, exactly, I don't understand and I do not like. No, not everything about her life is known, but why change what IS known, other than to make "reasons" for her behavior. But they're not reasons if they are fake.She also never calls DiMaggio or Miller by name--but we all know who they are meant to be. Why is DiMaggio's Sicilian mother obsessed with properly cooked risotto? Risotto is a Po Valley food--rice does not grow in Sicily! Is this sloppiness, or is Oates trying to "hide" the true identities of the "characters" to avoid being sued by descendants? Why not just write a novel, an original story? Why take a real person's life and change their childhood, put words in their mouth, thoughts in their head, use aliases for others (study execs all get letters), to make a fake biography? It annoys me, and as both a genealogist and historian it pisses me off. Mostly I found this to be a very frustrating read. I feel like I need to read actual MM biographies to clear my head. I find this sooo hard to discuss because am I discussing a life or a story? I CAN'T TELL.
  • (4/5)
    Fictionalized biography of Marilyn Monroe by Joyce Carol Oates. I can't say that I really enjoyed the book. I am not into reading about actresses and Hollywood but I knew about Marilyn Monroe. Born in 1926 and died 1962. I would have been 8 years old at the time. I can't say that I've ever watched any of her movies but I can say that I am familiar with the icon Marilyn. Her image is an American icon. This book while a work of fiction is the author's interpretation of what it might have been like and what may have drove Marilyn or Norma Jean. She had an awful life but she made something of that life and one could say that she had resiliency but she also was traumatized and in the end Hollywood won and Norma Jean lost. The book uses initials and descriptions of person's job or acclaim such as ex athlete and playwright and President rather than names. I did not like the book. The book was readable. It was a book about a sex symbol and therefore the subject matter was sex and language and also Hollywood culture which included drugs.
  • (4/5)
    It took me awhile to finish this book but it was definitely worth the read. I have never really been a Monroe fan and didn't have any real interest. This was a book club pick which unfortunately I didn't complete for the discussion but after a few chapters, I did get into it and wanted to finish it. The nightstand book that I fell asleep to many a nights. Bottom Line - I feel like I was reading Marilyn's Diary. It felt very authentic. I have to say I have a soft spot in my heart for Marilyn Monroe that wasn't there before and I was really rooting for a different ending to her story. She deserves her status as an Icon, no wonder everyone loves Marilyn all these years later- I guess, I even love her too!
  • (2/5)
    The story of this book is compelling; the narrative is compulsively readable. However, this is a NOVEL. What parts are true? What parts are made up in Oates's head? Does it matter? It does to me. I don't understand the fictionalizing of a real person's life. I think it's wrong. If a biographer gets something wrong or has a skewed agenda, then it can be argued in a review or another biography can be written. But this this is "fiction"--so where do you go to "fix" Oates's vision of this woman's real life? I got about halfway through this book and gave up on it.
  • (3/5)
    This book really showed you how Marilyn must have been in her days. She talks about her childhood years as a foster child. The story talks of her all her marriages and shows how mentally unstable she was. A good read.
  • (5/5)
    What a book. A great American novel that makes her life the epic it deserves, and lays bare the sickness beneath the artifice in American culture from the '30s to the '60s, culminating with her death shortly after being paraded out to sing "Happy Birthday" for the President while she was barely able to function. In a career of great novels, many call this JCO's masterpiece, and I've only read six or so, but this is an incredible accomplishment. Even if you aren't interested in Monroe, it is beautiful, tragic, compelling reading.
  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    I can't recommend this fictionalized version of the life of Marilyn Monroe more highly. I had put off reading it for a long time since it is so voluminous (more than 700 pages), but almost every word resonates, and it is well-worth the time invested (though that was much less than might be thought, since it is such a compelling read).Oates warns in her forward that this book should not be read as a historic document--she calls it a radically distilled "life" in the form of fiction. She states that in place of numerous lovers, medical crises, abortions, and suicide attempts, she has selected a symbolic few, although the husbands are there, referred to as "the ex-athlete" and "the playwright". (There was also a brief early marriage to "Bucky"). However, I think that the book captures the essence of Marilyn Monroe, who was a mass of contradictions--the "dumb blonde" and the intellectual, the prude and the sex-pot, the little girl and the sophisticate. Overall, Oates depicts Marilyn's life as a search for her father (she frequently called her lovers and husbands "Daddy"). Moreover, the book is a fascinating inside look at the avarice and brutality of Hollywood and its insiders as they exploit "Norma Jean" and create the fiction of Marilyn Monroe.There are some readers who don't care for Oates's writing style. She sometimes tends to run on. I don't find that a problem, and I loved this book.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (5/5)
    “In life, the woman was hell and in hell; on film, divine.”-Billy Wilder“Beauty is a question of optics. All sight is illusion.”This is a fictionalized account of Norma Jeane Baker, aka Marilyn Monroe. From a stuttering, neglected, little girl, to a drugged out, burned out starlet. It is not an easy read. This woman is relentlessly abused, exploited, raped and scorned for 700 pages. Nightmarish and hallucinogenic. What makes it captivating and readable, is the author's terrific writing skill and wildly ambitious approach. She has surely done her homework too, capturing many facets of the film industry and her complex relationships, with her many husbands. Do not take this as a true biography, but if your stomach and brain can handle the abuse, give it a try.
  • (5/5)
    “Blonde” is about the quintessential American blond icon: Marilyn Monroe. It’s a fictionalized biography that is grounded in research but takes off into imagination; inventing love affairs, merging multiple people into one archetypal persona, and looking into the mind of MM. Not just into her mind; into her heart and soul. Somehow, Oates manages, with her dense prose, to put the reader in Norma Jeane’s self, and feel everything she feels. It’s not a pleasant place to be, but it’s un-put-downable. The novel is slow at the beginning but picks up steam rapidly; Oates goes into detail about Norma Jeane’s childhood. It was a horrible childhood (as MM’s childhood was) and the prose takes us deep into just *how* horrible it was. MM’s disastrous teenage marriage, her discovery by a photographer, her early Hollywood days and being forced to provide sex for the studio bosses, and her success at great cost are all detailed. Not a drinker and against drugs, she ended up drinking heavily and taking uppers, downers, and who knows what else to get her through her days on the set and the social appearances that were demanded of her. Through it all, all she really wanted was for someone to love her, the true her, Norma Jeane, not the cardboard cutout Marilyn Monroe. She only got that once, for a very short time, and turned it down when it appeared. At over seven hundred pages, “Blonde” is not a light read, but it’s pretty fast for how dense it is. It haunted my mind for days after finishing it. I’ve read several biographies of Monroe, and none of them really gave me the feel of her life like this novel did.
  • (5/5)
    This was a wonderful book. It took me just a little bit to really get into it (even though I was hooked right off the bat, it just wasn't super fast-paced initially), but once I did I sped through it, reading the bulk of this large tome in only two days. Oates' writing is fabulous, and her use of fictionalizing the story a bit enabled her to fully get into Marilyn's head and let us see her more fully, in a way that a straight non-fiction work couldn't do. I'm definitely interested in seeing what else Oates can do.
  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    This is my favorite JCO book. If a novel could be a masterful impressionistic painting, this is what it would read like. Blonde is lovely and lyrical from first word to last. Unlike biography it paints a portrait of an interior world, one that seems to me to match up with the strange life of the American icon that was Marilyn.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (3/5)
    Blonde is the fictionalized biography of Marilyn Monroe, from birth to her 'suicide'. I've never followed Marilyn Monroe or known anything more than sketchy details about her life. Joyce Carol Oates tries to make some of the details intentionally vague - referring to famous people by just a single initial, and calling her husbands/lovers 'The Ex-Athlete', 'The Playwright' or 'The President'. The story is told through a combination of 3rd person narrative and Marilyn's point of view. A big part of this book is not being certain what is happening vs. what is part of Marilyn's descent into a drug-hazed reality or her own madness. I found it very unsettling. I did find interesting the aspects that dealt with how Hollywood treated female stars at the time - the casting couch, the horrible salaries, etc., but overall, I found the book to be artistically crafted but very disturbing. Unlike other reviewers, I was glad when it ended.
  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    Oohh, this was a great read. Oates's controversial novel is a fictionalization of the life of the Hollywood siren Marilyn Monroe. Some have found it repellent that the author dared to write about such a tragedy without knowing the truth of possible abuses, love affairs, abortions, drug use, etc... But I accept this work as fiction and it seemed more than fair to me in its treatment of Norma Jeane. The writing is daring and thrilling in its unconventionality (e.g. Death comes riding on a bicycle in the opening scene). All I know is, I wasn't a fan of the actress before this novel, and now I may be bordering on obsessed. (can't get enough of her on youtube!) Read this if you're not entirely familiar with MM's story; if you are, you've been fair warned.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    I found this book to be shockingly good. Only as a fictionalized biography, could Oates have gotten under the skin of Norma Jean and the people in her life the way she did. I want to go back and see all of her movies again, read more about her life and after an interval of needed rest from the sadness of this book, read Norman Mailer's biography of Monroe. Thank you Joyce Carol Oates for writing this book.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    Powerful and enthralling fictionalized account of Marilyn Monroe's life and death--very very sad. I'm reading some bios. of her to try to figure out what's true--factually. But this version is true in the way that great art is true. Once again, Oates amazes me.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (4/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    Certainly a wonderful mix of research and creative thought, but I was tremendously disappointed with the final section of the book -- especially the way Oates chose to handle Monroe's death. My first experience reading Oates.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (5/5)
    Oates has a unique talent for creating the most mesmerizing plots. This novel is part poem, part drama, part homage, a giant fresco designed to see one of the most known stars in a completely new light. What I find to be a coup de maître is the fact that Norma Jeane never disappears throughout all of Marilyn's life: a shy, scared girl looking for approval and terrified of failure. Monroe's life suddenly makes so much sense.Far from being knowledgeable about Monroe's biography, I was transported through fact and fiction, never bored and slightly amazed at the sing song allure of the story which constantly pulls the reader back into the plot.A haunting tale.
  • (4/5)
    Blonde, is a sensitive interpretation of Norma Jean Mortenson’s (Marilyn Monroe) inner-self as it was shaped and influenced by her life experiences. This portrayal, by Joyce Carol Oates, is intended to show Hollywood’s iconic star as she was –a real person affected by dysfunctional life experiences that started at birth and ended with her premature death, at 36. Her outer mystic is peeled away to expose a spiritual life that yearned for what everyone deserves, unconditional love and acceptance. This makes Norma Jean’s life all the more tragic. She was not a dumb blond, but a self-educated and motivated individual who sought for, but never discovered, who she was.