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Hot Zone: A Terrifying True Story

Hot Zone: A Terrifying True Story

Geschrieben von Richard Preston

Erzählt von Richard M. Davidson


Hot Zone: A Terrifying True Story

Geschrieben von Richard Preston

Erzählt von Richard M. Davidson

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (101 Bewertungen)
Länge:
11 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Mar 8, 2011
ISBN:
9781442343313
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

A highly infectious, deadly virus from the central African rain forest suddenly appears in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. There is no cure. In a few days 90 percent of its victims are dead. A secret military SWAT team of soldiers and scientists is mobilized to stop the outbreak of this exotic "hot" virus.

The Hot Zone tells this dramatic story, giving a hair-raising account of the appearance of rare and lethal viruses and their "crashes" into the human race. Shocking, frightening, and impossible to ignore, The Hot Zone proves that truth really is scarier than fiction.

A Simon & Schuster audio production.

Freigegeben:
Mar 8, 2011
ISBN:
9781442343313
Format:
Hörbuch


Über den Autor

Michael Crichton has sold over 200 million books, which have been translated into thirty-eight languages; thirteen of his books have been made into films. Also known as a filmmaker and the creator of ER, he remains the only writer to have had the number one book, movie, and TV show simultaneously. At the time of his death in 2008, Crichton was well into the writing of Micro; Richard Preston was selected to complete the novel. Richard Preston is the internationally bestselling author of eight books, including The Hot Zone and The Wild Trees. He is a regular contributor to The New Yorker. He lives with his wife and three children near Princeton, New Jersey.

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4.3
101 Bewertungen / 61 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    Scary, Scary book - wonderful.
  • (5/5)
    The Hot Zone By:Richard Preston The Hot Zone by Richard Preston is about the Ebola virus. For many years the Ebola virus has been lurking in the shadows. Now it is coming out. Throughout the book there have been many cases of Ebola found in Africa. This is the place where the virus first became known. Soon, the virus spreads to the United States of America. Undetected by many civilians, only a few people from the CDC and USAMRIID know about the cases of Ebola. In a monkey house in Virginia monkeys are starting to become sick. Doctors working with the monkeys find out that they tested positive for Ebola. The whole entire monkey house then goes into quarantine. People still today do not realise how close we were to an Ebola outbreak in America. Richard Preston did an unbelievable job in making this non-fiction novel a thriller. It is a true page turner. As you get into the book you start to realise how deadly Ebola can be and how close we were to getting it. Richard Preston did a great job in his vocabulary use by making the novel not to hard to understand, but by still keeping it interesting. Usually some non-fiction books could be boring and filled to the brim with facts, but this was just in the middle and just right. Overall, it was an exciting adventure and learning experience. Although this book was incredible, there was some downsides to it. During the book I thought there became too many short stories that intertwined with each other. It became a little confusing. Another downside to the book was that there was way too many characters. Some characters were in completely different short stories making it become confusing while reading. At times it became hard to follow. Still even with the downsides this was a great book to read.
  • (4/5)
    Frightening stuff.
  • (5/5)
    Fascinating. Horrifying.
  • (5/5)
    Riveting and scary as all get out. You'll never look at air travel quite the same again.
  • (5/5)
    The classic account that introduced the Ebola virus to modern imagination. Since I live nearby the laboratory where this takes place it was great fun and I still remember the Washington Post reports when it was happening (though they were much less concerned at the time then in retrospect). Preston has been accused of overplaying the disease and danger but that doesn't take away from the essence of it. A little fictive makes is easier to sleep. A classic of narrative nonfiction.
  • (3/5)
    What can I say? This book got me into microbiology. I secretly want to be a virus hunter, too.
  • (4/5)
    I'm not sure when exactly I read this..5th 6th grade? All I remember is loving it. For years afterward I wanted to work at the CDC. Liquefied organs, bleeding out your eyes; I read snippets out loud to friends. Needless to say, I was a morbid child. A thrilling and super grotesque portrait of a virus that is more terrifying than you can imagine.
  • (5/5)
    We're doomed. This book truly is scary. I had heard of Ebola many times but this really brought to home just how horrifying and deadly it really is. The day that virus mutates into an airborne pathogen is the day the human race faces extinction.

    And if you thought descriptions of the Black Plague were bad you ain't seen nothing yet. Death by filovirus would have to be one of the worst ways to go. Your body literally liquifies while you are still alive. Blood pours from every orifice. Every organ fails and half of them pass out of your body before you're gone. You end up a mess of slime and bone.

    We have close many times and it's getting more likely that we will soon face a serious pandemic. Let's just hope it's not something with a mortality rate like Ebola Zaire.
  • (4/5)
    Totally interesting, very gripping, great writer, great language, heldme close all the way through..until it got to a point where it was more of a rescue operation rather than the virus. at that point it kinda died.
  • (3/5)
    As seems to be the usual with these books, a bit on the alarmist side. BUT lots and lots of great stories of outbreaks, near outbreaks, scientific triumphs and scientific infighting from all over the world.
  • (3/5)
    This was an interesting book. It was a little disconcerting jumping around between events, but the reasoning was clear and the flow relatively seamless. The descriptions of the virus were fascinating, though a little scary. I sure would not want to ba around if the human strain becomes airborne! This is a little dry at times but very interesting and well worth reading.
  • (4/5)
    Non-fiction about emerging virus' from Africa and an out break at a primate facility in Reston, Virginia in 1989. Well written and preachy at the end but I was enlightened about an event that didn't make it onto the radar.
  • (5/5)
    I read this in 7th grade and it launched a thirst for 'bug' books. I really enjoy reading books about viruses and other bugs and this one does not disappoint. It grabs your attention from the start and holds it until the end and leaves you wanting more.
  • (4/5)
    Wow, what an experience it was reading this piece of non-fiction. My field is in environmental health and this really is like the type of thing that epidemiologists prepare for yet hope never happens. It's frightening and real and a very good read.
  • (5/5)
    I was hooked from the first page I never thought I would like a book about a virus as my preconceived notion is that it would be too technical and too detailed. I also don't read a lot of strictly non-fiction. However, Preston has done a great job into making it into a mystery/novel form. I've read it twice!
  • (3/5)
    Richard Preston has taken a technically difficult subject and made it accessible to the masses.
  • (5/5)
    When I was working at Barnes and Noble this book made a reading list for high school students. It was after the second year that it was required reading that I decided I wanted to read it as well. I bought a copy thinking I would read it in my spare time. Once I started reading it through I couldn't stop until I had finished the whole thing.This book sent chills down my spine, and with it being a work of non fiction that says a lot about the book and what Preston wrote. I had nightmares for weeks about the Ebola virus. It is chilling and terrifying to know that this is what really goes on in our world, that a disease can do so much damage and no one can stop it right now.This is a must read for anyone who likes horror novels, this really a non-fiction horror novel. It will scare you, enthrall you and really make you think twice before going into the darker regions of the world.
  • (4/5)
    Terrifying, disgusting, unsettling...and completely fascinating. Not for the squeamish or those who are not interested in this type of subject. Written in a very entertaining style that reads like fiction without any dry, scientific information that would put the non-scientist to sleep.
  • (4/5)
    Excellent suspenseful book that will make you eye nondescript buildings in nondescript office parks very warily.
  • (4/5)
    Scared the heck out of me.
  • (5/5)
    Hands-down, THE most frightening non-fiction I've ever read. An absolute thilling, page-turner. I still have no clue where they got the story for that horrible movie based on this book!
  • (4/5)
    One of, if not the scariest book I've read. Because it's true. If you are a germaphobe, don't read this book!
  • (4/5)
    The first non-fiction book I read that wasn't assigned by a professor. Scared the daylights out of me. The movie stunk.
  • (4/5)
    Riveting and terrifying book about the spread of fatal infectious diseases, such as ebola. Ebola kills 9 out of 10 victims and might be spread through the air. If it is, we could be looking at another world-wide epidemic.
  • (5/5)
    The best dramatization of true events that I have ever read, period.
  • (4/5)
    Stephen King said it best: "The first chapter of The Hot Zone is one of the most horrifying things I've ever read in my whole life..."
  • (5/5)
    This book made me want to major in biochemistry and find a cure to ebola when I was like 10 years old. Unfortunately, I almost failed college chem, but it was an incredibly good book, very gory and detailed. I think I should re-read it soon...
  • (5/5)
    A terrific book right at the start, when Preston provides a graphic description of a guy "crashing" while on an airplane flight. It gets better from there, and is full of bureaucracy, bravery and biology.
  • (2/5)
    Pretty much a waste of time.