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Under The Dome: A Novel

Under The Dome: A Novel

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Raul Esparza


Under The Dome: A Novel

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Raul Esparza

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (516 Bewertungen)
Länge:
34 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Nov 10, 2009
ISBN:
9780743597319
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

On an entirely normal, beautiful fall day in Chester's Mill, Maine, the town is inexplicably and suddenly sealed off from the rest of the world by an invisible force field. Planes crash into it and fall from the sky in flaming wreckage, a gardener's hand is severed as "the dome" comes down on it, people running errands in the neighboring town are divided from their families, and cars explode on impact. No one can fathom what this barrier is, where it came from, and when -- or if -- it will go away.

Dale Barbara, Iraq vet and now a short-order cook, finds himself teamed with a few intrepid citizens -- town newspaper owner Julia Shumway, a physician's assistant at the hospital, a select-woman, and three brave kids. Against them stands Big Jim Rennie, a politician who will stop at nothing -- even murder -- to hold the reins of power, and his son, who is keeping a horrible secret in a dark pantry. But their main adversary is the Dome itself. Because time isn't just short. It's running out.
Freigegeben:
Nov 10, 2009
ISBN:
9780743597319
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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516 Bewertungen / 279 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! It took me forever to read, but it was suspenseful from start to finish and very enjoyable.
    The character drove me absolutely crazy sometimes, because they just don't understand how manipulative Big Jim is! I had to take a break every now and then to calm down...
    I was also impressed by how King could have a story with so many characters and write in a way that allowed be to know who everyone was the whole time.
  • (4/5)
    It can't compete with THE STAND.
  • (4/5)
    Like receiving B-level work from an A+ student, "Under the Dome" may not be King's most memorable work, due in part to an anticlimactic ending, but it is nonetheless a worthy feat.
  • (5/5)
    Great book. Much better than the TV series. All the dumb stuff from the series wasn't in the book.
  • (4/5)
    I could not put this book down! As usual, Stephen King made me very uncomfortable but I could not look away. (Even women, children, and small animals are not safe in his stories). The story got under my skin and the pace kept moving. I had to keep reading through the horrific moments to see how that particular character would get through, and I was pleased that some of them did. There were many characters, but I could easily relate to some of them and very easily hate others. Their methods of survival and the breakdown of law or social relations were very well-detailed in a believable way. The length of the book did not matter; he created a new reality, he is so descriptive of everything that it made me, as a reader, feel as if I was there. At some points I wished I wasn't, but it was true to King's style of horror; you have to know going into this that people are going to die and some of them are the very ones you're rooting for. Very interesting and satisfying ending, that is all I'll say so as not to spoil it!
  • (3/5)
    A small New England town is suddenly, inexplicably cut off from the rest of the world, trapping a large cast of characters inside (or outside) a huge, clear dome. As the emergency escalates, various heroes (and villains) emerge to play a part in the drama. What is the dome? Why is it there? Will the town survive? This is the premise of Stephen King's big, long, (aren't they all?) thoroughly fascinating new novel.

    I've been reading Stephen King for 35 years now--I read his first 3 novels in college--and I've always been impressed by his work. But "Under the Dome" is in a small group of King stories that go far beyond merely being entertaining fiction. This novel will inevitably be compared to The Stand because it deals with the horrors of the world around us. Forget ghosts and vampires and space aliens--there's nothing as horrifying as what humans are capable of doing to one another.

  • (4/5)
    Like most Steven King boos this one is set in the state of Maine in a little town just outside Castle Rock. While on the surface this book appears similar to The Stand or Shawshank Redemption in that everything appears normal- underneath is the same current of secret alien lurkers that travels through most of King's books-- the unifying factor that ties them all together. Overall an excellent book
  • (5/5)
    Wicked fun.
  • (4/5)
    Stephen King is amazing.
  • (3/5)
    Stephen King had a morale in mind when writing this book, and it was always right in front. It got to the point where I felt he had a BIG bat and kept knocking me over the head with it. It reminded me of a theory a college professor proposed in one of my graduate classes in college. The prof proposed that in high school and earlier you'd be surrounded by people Stephen King was bashing in Under the Dome. If you decide to get more education, and then work in a position that requires a college degree you would not be exposed to moments that reminded one Under the Dome character of middle school. The character was ganged up on and beat up - the old pushed from the front and tripped in the back by two bullies trick. I just kept telling myself that these things could not happen at that decision making level.
  • (3/5)
    I really had to push through this one. There were some interesting ideas in here; I always love reading about how small groups of relative strangers come together in times of crisis. However, I think a lot got lost in this book because it was so bloated. One thing that I don't personally enjoy about King is his dialogue; it seems so unnatural. Another thing that bothered me about this book was the ending. I thought it was terrible. I don't want to ruin anything for anyone, so I won't get into particulars. I just wish that after having invested so much time in this book, the reward had been greater.After all that being said, I will admit that I did find parts of the book enjoyable and some of the plot points were exciting or interesting. I didn't give up on the book even though I did have to put it aside for weeks at a time. Probably won't revisit this one.
  • (1/5)
    I picked this up because a friend was reading it and was enjoying the multiple points of views. Right away I remembered why I stopped reading King so many years ago.
    The characters are too folksy-jokey for me, the plot points often seem to be included only for laughs, and while the level of writing is common for genre works, the lack of any other driver made me put it down. I really wanted to read this book because I thought that as a writer who works with multiple viewpoints, it might have something to offer. But I just couldn't get through more than 30 pages. Pure torture all the way.
  • (5/5)
    I finally got to know what happened as CBS kept jacking the series around and what if I died before the conclusion ended? This book is the second longest I think by this other and it's worth it!
  • (5/5)
    A beautiful look into what makes the human mind tick.
  • (4/5)
    I had not King since high school when I devoured everything he wrote Carrie, Cujo, The Stand, Pet Cemetery, Salems Lot and who could forget IT. Hee-bee Jee-bee's scare the hell out of you!! So when the TV Series Under the Dome came out and ended on such a cliff hanger holy cow batman I can not wait until the season starts back up to find out what happens. Downloaded the book to my kindle and I should have known that the series took artistic liberties and was more of a re-imagining. Thank goodness Barbie is still a good guy and Big Jim can I get an AMEN!

    The Book - Wow! King does not disappoint with a whole cast of characters some you cheer for and hope they make it through the nightmare that has become their life and others not only disgust you and make your skin crawl you hope they get caught or better yet Karma takes them. What do you get when you slam a glass dome down on a small town, you get the world amplified in a giant snow globe for everyone to see. In the real world if you have the means you can escape but under the dome you are like a mouse caught in a trap. I know you can picture that guy with the GOD complex and whom power becomes the ultimate drug and everyone else is to just bow to his beck and call without question. This book takes hold and you want to turn away or put it down but you have to know does good triumph or is it going to be a "clusterbug" for the ages.

    The TV Series - Kudos to a great re-imagining so far so good. Cannot wait to see how this package gets tied up and what kind of an ending is in store for Chesters Mill. Great job casting the characters of Barbie, Big Jim, Junior and Julie the key characters to the story.

    Final Thoughts - If the zombie apocalypse, hurricane, major blizzard has not made you get supplies this book should make you think about disaster preparedness and survival. Whatever you do keep a low profile do not get on the radar of the Big Jim Rennie of your town. What do we always say things like that could never happen in my town.
  • (3/5)
    A mysterious transparent barrier appears, cutting off a small Maine town from the outside world.
    And then things happen, and there are many, many details provided about the events that transpire.

    In many ways, this book is classic King. If you're a fan, you'll like it. I nearly always find myself critical of King - but yet, I keep reading his books - hey, there's something to them. I can't say I didn't enjoy the book, but still, from my perspective, it's both too long for the actual content, and the content is overblown.

    I would've liked it more if it were a more serious study of the psychological effects of insularity and isolation - and there are some nods in that direction, especially toward the end of the book. But for all King's exhaustive detail regarding his many characters, there isn't a lot of depth here. The evil folks are pure evil, and the good folks are unambiguously The Good Guys.

    And a great deal of the book, for me is just 'too much.' Too many coincidences, too many ridiculous things shoehorned in.

    This randomly-chosen small town Just Happens to be run by a used-car salesman with delusions of grandeur who Just Happens to secretly be the top meth lab kingpin in America, who Just Happens to have a son with a brain tumor who is a serial killer... etc. I was OK with the reason for it all being Aliens, but the logic doesn't really hold up to much analysis - you just have to accept that, well, it's aliens, and this is all a metaphor for the universality of unthinking cruelty.(?)

    I also found the finale, like in many King novels, too overdramatic and not very believable. The fact that the "good guys" lived and everyone else dies was also just too much.

  • (5/5)
    I'm only 200 pages in, but HOLY COW! Crazy story... and keeps reminding me of The Stand- not in content, but in spirit. Loving it so far!

    Okay, now just over 300 pages, and it's only day 3. I don't know if my nerves can take this book!!

    Almost 400 pages in, and WTF? I'm dying- DYING- to know what's about to happen... and it won't be good, I know that much. Big Jim and his psycho son need to go. If I could get under that damn dome I'd kill them myself!

    Officially half-way through the book. It's day 4 and the shit has hit multiple fans, I'm completely enthralled, and really wish I could find a way into a fictional world so I can commit multiple accounts of fictional murder. You're killing me, Mr. King... you're fucking killing me.

    800 pages in now and all I can do in mumble incoherently about justified murder and Yankee rednecks...

    HOLY SHIT!!! What a frickin ride... total mindfuck... I'm going to need a few days to get over this story. Maybe a month or so.

    So good! So, SO good! Very much in the spirit of The Stand. Totally blown away!
  • (3/5)
    READ IN ENGLISH

    I expected this book to be so unbelievably good, as it was written by Stephen King and some of my friends always tell me everything he has written (and they've read) is pure gold. And, besides that, it's Dystopian. So, how bad could it be?

    The story seems a bit similar to the Gone-series (Michael Grant), with it's first book published almost simultaneously with Under The Dome (at least in The Netherlands).
    An enormous sphere is placed around a little town, trapping everything -and everyone- who's in that town at that moment 'under this dome'. As is often seen in Dystopian novels, control and 'normal human behavior' is one of the first things the people run out off. Survival of the strongest (not necessarily the fittest, but just the persons handling the guns).

    Problem just was that I thought it to be boring sometimes, there were so many characters, and normally I don't mind, but here it really was a lot. And there was quite a high body count as well (and fast, normally I wouldn't expect a total loss of control just that fast).
    What I didn't really liked either was how King was giving away everything with a bit of suspense that was about to happen. *SPOILERS FOLLOWING* For example, a man decides to go and shoot people in a police office. Okay, you think. But before he does shoot this people down, you get to read 'I'm going to go to the police station now to kill some people'.
    Surprise, surprise, what would happen next?

    I really wanted to like this book, but because of these things I just thought it to be a very long read, with it's almost 900 pages.
  • (4/5)
    ** 2013 -- Re-reading for no other reason than to see if it's as lame as I thought before.

    I would give this book a higher rating if it wasn't so heavy and I could find a more comfortable position to read it in. I'm only a couple hundred pages in.The other thing is I know everyone's trapped under the dome and he's set up all the characters in typical King fashion and I can guess what all those characters are going to do (Worry, Fuck, and Kill - but don't worry, the good guy always wins). I think I'll wait for either great muscular biceps or a kindle to appear on my bookshelf. Neither seem likely soon.
  • (4/5)
    This is the first Stephen King book I've read. I HATE horror and tension in books and movies - so I have stayed far away. Then I caught just a part of one episode of this on TV and thought it looked intriguing. As soon as I started reading I was hooked. It is the kind of book I really enjoy - tons of story lines criss-crossing and weaving to create a story. I kept waiting for the tension and gore and all that I hated. But, when it came I was so deeply invested in the story that I just kept reading.The story is a week in the life of a small Maine town after a dome has fallen cutting it off from the world. Life inside the dome could have been fine - but the town is run by Big Jim Rennie - a megomaniac leader who believes that he can do anything in the name of Christianity and National pride. He runs over anyone who tries to actually improve the town because he was not the one to plan it. And he does have a plan - to line his pockets with money from his hidden industry - one that is completely and totally illegal - and needs the towns resources to make it work.The other main character is Barbie - a retired Marine, drifter and short order cook who was on his way out of town when the dome came down. Barbie was leaving town after a run in with Big Jim's completely insane son, Junior and his croonies. Then the dome came down. Barbie is the voice of reason and reality so of course he is Big Jim's arch enemy. It doesn't help that Barbie's connections on the other side of the dome have delivered a letter from the President naming him the leader of the town. This is a story of what could happen and what doesn't need to happen.But that is what is happening inside the dome. But there is also the story of the dome itself...That is a story of the potential of cruelty and callousness of all of us.It isn't all grim. There are moments of great love and caring. There are people who are willing to give up everything for the good of others. And that is what makes a great story - the good and the bad in all of us and how it comes together. Wow! King can tell a story!
  • (4/5)
    Six-word review: Chaos overtakes a suddenly isolated town.Extended review:If 11/22/63 was Stephen King the Author pulling out all the stops in a virtuoso display of everything he'd mastered while successfully publishing some 50 novels over 37 years, Under the Dome was King the Trickster playing God in the sandbox, blowing up anthills with cherry bombs, laughing his head off the whole time.And honestly, I don't begrudge him the joke. I'm recalling the old Zen koan about the goose in the bottle. Steve knows how to get the goose out.There was a time when I'd kept up with King, read everything he wrote as fast as it came out. That ended with Christine in 1983. From there it was an occasional return (Misery, Needful Things, Rose Madder), only to back off again, and a few abandonments (forgotten). As far as I was concerned, he was straining to recapture the essence of what had made his early work so gripping, using a formula that more or less boiled down to "a magic X" (touch, necklace, cemetery, car), and it wasn't working for me any longer. I moved on.But I couldn't resist delving into his take on the defining moment of our youth--ours, because King and I are only months apart in age--namely, the Kennedy assassination. With that he won me back completely, reminding me of what he could do and how well he could do it when he focused and gave it his all. 11/22/63 rated four and a half stars from me, and it was probably only the H.G. Wells Time Machine ending that kept it from being five. I could happily have gone on with it for several hundred more pages, experiencing my own time travel as King took me vividly back to scenes of my youth in New England--and hoping against hope that even for just one fictional moment I might see a different outcome on that terrible November day.And so, when my husband suggested it, I was ready after all this time to tackle another voluminous King novel. He enticed me into reading--or, rather, listening to him read--Under the Dome by promising me that it was loaded with instances of things that King oughtn't to have done as an author, but he did. (An odd footnote here is that my husband had already read all 874 pages of the thing, and here he was offering to go through it again, this time at a slow read-aloud pace that would take months.) And that made me curious. More: it whetted my appetite. After 16 years of weekly read-alouds, my husband well knows the pleasure I take in picking on an author's mistakes--continuity errors, egregious repetition, malapropisms, et cetera--and, even more so, editorial lapses, frequently a different breed of error entirely. Think of it as a variant of how a sports fan reacts when an athlete blows a play: calling out his screwups is part of the entertainment. I began my editorial career just about when King published The Dead Zone, and I've been reading with an editor's double vision ever since. Retirement doesn't shut off the instinct. And this was, you might say, a target-rich environment.So we hooted when King suddenly slipped into cinematic mode and gave us crane shots panning a crowd scene. We jeered when he switched into present tense and hopped from vignette to vignette as if he were narrating a double-page spread in a Where's Waldo? book. We groaned when he lapsed into a paternalistic nineteenth-century voice with dear-reader asides commenting on characters' motives and behavior or remarking on what was about to happen. And we scolded when he forgot what he'd just said and repeated himself or lost track of the location of a character or prop.But we also forgave him for going with the impulses, for goofing off and breaking the rules. He can afford it. He can even laugh at us. It's his game.Because he has nothing more to prove. He still tells a thumping good yarn, always did. He creates characters and builds suspense like the pro that he is. And he has that special knack of creating a distinctive character, even a minor one, out of just a few words and giving him or her a moment--even if only a cameo--in which to be seen. Just as we are all cameos or indistinct faces in the crowd scenes of someone else's drama. The camera rolls on and the moment is past, but we contributed something--a little color, a little perspective, a space-filler--that enriched the story somehow. King's novels are full of people like us.King's novels are full of people just like us.And we, King reminds us forcefully, all have our little lives.Under the Dome didn't quite wrap up the way I hoped it would. I wanted a complete, logical answer to what and why and how. I expected a real confrontational come-uppance for the bad guy, with justice overflowing to slake a thirst for payback. What's more, it was too stretched out in places and could have stood to lose a couple hundred pages of nonessential authorially self-indulgent verbiage.Still, I enjoyed it very much, enjoyed seeing how a single dramatically weird premise played out somewhat realistically (an impenetrable dome settles over a town and isolates its inhabitants from the rest of the world; now what?)--not, however, a unique one: any number of authors have stranded a group of people on an island, in a remote country house, on a ship, on a spacecraft or an airplane, on a planet, and so on--and then watched to see what would happen. This is just the first time it's been done this way.So, Steve, it did take me a couple of days after finishing Under the Dome, but only a couple, and then I knew whose the leather faces were.Thanks, I get it now. And you've earned a good laugh.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic book that catches you right from the beginning.
  • (3/5)
    I made it through the 34.5-hour audiobook. Entertaining enough but just meh.
  • (2/5)
    Did you see "The Simpsons" movie? Same plot: large, impenetrable dome plops itself down on small town. No one can leave, no one can enter. Hilaruty . . er, terror ensues. There's a decent 10 page Ray Bradbury short story hiding somewhere in this bloated snoozefest.
  • (3/5)
    Mid-level King. Notable for its length, which is somewhat justifiable given the many characters being tracked and the subtext of gradual ecological decay. The novel is weakest in how it resolves the puzzle of the Dome, the repeated use of the same plot device that depends critically on smart people doing the same stupid thing, and lack of development in its villains. The bad guys start really bad and stay that way. The novel is impressive in how King juggles the many story lines and maintains a relatively even flow of crisis. As noted in many places, the novel and TV series are linked only by location, character names, and the Dome itself. The plots diverge almost immediately and the series will no doubt end up in a very different place.
  • (1/5)
    Under the Dome by Stephen King opens with a pilot and instructor flying over the sleepy Maine countryside and then suddenly being smashed to pieces. A rock solid but completely transparent dome has encircled a town in Maine, effectively cutting it off from the rest of the world.Thus follows many more deaths. Really the first hundred pages or so are just the stupidest folks of the town all rushing towards the invisible barrier to their untimely deaths.After all that, those left are the most reprehensible dullards stuck inside with dwindling resources, a steadily rising temperature, and the military outside trying to figure out what's going on. And ultimately there's a single person who has control over the dome for reasons all his or her own.And frankly there was no way in hell I was going to sit through another five hundred pages of idiots being idiots until the person behind the magical dome had decided the mission was accomplished (or had managed to kill off everyone he or she wanted to kill off). So I skipped to the last hundred pages and sped through them to confirm what I'd already figured out so that I wouldn't waste hours more of my time.There's was also a television series based off this book. No, I didn't watch. Even when it comes onto Netflix (if it does), I have no desire to see it.
  • (4/5)
    Thoroughly enjoyed this audio version of The Dome. Narrator did a fabulous job of bringing to life each and everyone of the characters. As usual King creates in depth realistic characters that you grow to love and hate. Reminded me at times of The Stand, which those who know me understand that that is a huge compliment. Storyline moves nicely (could use a little less nasty descriptions and inner monologues) and lots of twists and turns. Hated having to stop listening so the dog ended up going for lots of long walks and house is cleanerHave been a fan of many works by King and still believes he needs to be edited more and wish he didn't kill off so many kids and animals. However, I highly recommend this one. You will not be disappointed. Bravo Mr King
  • (2/5)
    TV Show is better.... Not Steven King's best work.
  • (3/5)
    I'd say this is an average Stephen King novel... all the usual ingredients are there, it's far from a masterpiece, but it's not his worst book, either.

    I loved the human conflicts that The Dome brings to the surface... but was kind of disappointed with the resolution.

    Anyway, I enjoyed the reading (and if you like Stephen King, I'm sure you'll do, too).
  • (5/5)
    At first I did not think I was going to like it. The first twenty minutes or so (I listened to the audiobook) was really hard for me to follow at times since there was so much going on. I kept on, not wanting to give up on it, and I am glad I did. I was hooked. So much is going on that it is really hard to ever get bored. The characters are very well developed and the story does not let you go from beginning to end. I often found myself laughing and crying (sometimes at the same time). King was really able to pull me in as a reader and make me feel what the town/characters were feeling. I was also able to picture the entire story in my head. This book was everything I look for.