Finden Sie Ihren nächsten hörbuch Favoriten

Werden Sie noch heute Mitglied und hören Sie 30 Tage lang kostenlos
Beyond this Moment

Beyond this Moment

Geschrieben von Tamera Alexander

Erzählt von Bernadette Dunne


Beyond this Moment

Geschrieben von Tamera Alexander

Erzählt von Bernadette Dunne

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (9 Bewertungen)
Länge:
11 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Apr 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781596447059
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Dismissed from the university where she served as professor of romantic languages, Dr. Molly Whitcomb travels west to start over in the secluded mountain town of Timber Ridge, Colorado, where she'll be teaching children. Her train stops in Denver, and on a whim, Molly purchases a wedding band—an attempt to cover a mistake, but also a chance at a fresh start.

Sheriff James McPherson was eager to hire a schoolteacher, but Dr. Whitcomb isn't what he expected. His instincts about people—which rarely miss the mark—tell him she's hiding something. And when Molly's secret is revealed, her reinvented life begins to unravel. What's more, she risks losing her new-found relationship with the sheriff and her renewed faith in God.

Freigegeben:
Apr 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781596447059
Format:
Hörbuch


Über den Autor

Tamera Alexander is a USA Today bestselling novelist whose works have been awarded and nominated for numerous industry-leading honors, including the Christy Award (two-time winner, seven-time finalist), the RITA Award (two-time winner, four-time finalist), the Carol Award, the Maggie Award, the Booksellers Best Award, and Library Journal's top distinction, among others. After seventeen years in Colorado, Tamera and her husband now reside in Nashville, Tennessee, where they live a short distance from Belmont Mansion and Belle Meade Plantation, the setting of Tamera’s two USA Today bestselling Southern series.  

Ähnlich wie Beyond this Moment

Ähnliche Hörbücher

Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Beyond this Moment denken

4.4
9 Bewertungen / 4 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    Sometimes it can seem downright impossible to escape our pasts, to start anew after we make mistakes. Though with our somewhat looser morals in contemporary society, it is likely easier to avoid the consequence of our actions today, than in the past. Today publicized bad behavior makes us admired “celebrities”. This cuts both ways, however, in that we have looser morals in some areas, but stronger in others, while “moral outrage” is sometimes less about genuine principle, and more about using our outrage as a weapon against those whom we may dislike.This is the crux of the situation in the historical Christian inspirational novel, Beyond This Moment, book two of Tamera Alexander's Timber Ridge Reflections novels. A young woman named Molly Whitcomb has become incredibly accomplished, yet also has made enemies, by her insistence on earning a Ph.D. Women earning graduate degrees were not exactly popular during the 1870's and 1880's, when this story takes place. This “going against the grain” is both a Christian virtue and a sin, in it's relation to Molly's feelings of insecurity and willingness to trust God, as well as a source of social stigma that comes back to bite her in the end.As the story starts, Dr. Whitcomb used to be a college professor in her home state of Georgia, but not anymore. She has engaged in inappropriate and sinful behavior, behavior for which she alone was punished for several reasons (while the other party was not), one of which was that she is a woman. She mulls over her life to date, and wonders how she will handle the reactions of the townsfolk at her new post in Timber Ridge, Colorado, where she will be the school teacher. Fearful that she will fall into poverty if she is rejected when her past is discovered, she makes a fateful choice to lie about it.Once she arrives in Timber Ridge, she makes friends with the characters from the first book, Daniel and Elizabeth Ranslett, Rachel Boyd, James McPherson, and the former slaves Josiah and Belle Birch with their son Elijah, along with others. She loves her life there, and is falling in love with McPherson, but knows that if, when, the truth comes out, it will all be crashing down around her. Molly is convinced that this is God's punishment on her, but could it be a blessing in disguise? It can be, but only if she can trust God enough to repent and face her mistakes head-on.This book was both far more enjoyable than the first story, but also quite difficult to read. The storyline stayed as a historical period piece, without the somewhat badly done mystery of the first book, but it also made me cringe and wince in sympathy for the pain that Molly undergoes, and the cruelty and hypocrisy with which people treat her. The injustice she was exposed to was very hard to read.That is the source of really my only criticism of the work. I want to be clear. I do not at all like or enjoy stories of revenge or gratuitous violence. I don't want to see the bad guys suffer in graphic detail, or in a way that is somehow “vengeful”. That said, it would be nice to see the bad guys having justice done, and/or learning their lessons. In this work, some of the most cruel, cold-hearted, vile hypocrites, ended up with no real adverse consequences to their actions, and having to admit no wrong. That is on top of being personally, politically, and socially, better off than they were before the story started. One could almost say that the bad guys won just as much as the good guys did. Again, I don't want to see graphic or gratuitous violence and revenge on the antagonists, but to see justice and the bad guys not making out as well as, or better than, the good characters, would be nice. Granted, one could say that they are suffering even if they don't know it by not having the joy that comes from a close relationship with God through His Son Jesus Christ, but it would be nice if Alexander would have pointed this out.Despite the above criticism, and the difficulty to read the sad parts of the story, this tale quite draws you into the historical period, and places you in the beautiful, wonderful, yet harsh realities of that time. In fact, the research into the peoples, places, customs, and so forth, of the time, as well as the beautiful descriptions of God's creation, really make the tale worth-while.Recommended.
  • (5/5)
    This is the second book in the Timber Ridge Reflection series and as I read the first one, the story just flows. Molly Whitcomb stepped from the train and pause to look around, she waited to get her luggage as she had something she had to do before she left on the stage for the last part of her journey to Timber Ridge Colorado where she was to begin her job as the new teacher. She had worked to get her dictatorial degree in languages, and was working at Franklin College as a professor when beyond her control after her father died she was let go and was sent to Timber Ridge to set up a new school where there never had been one before.Molly had no idea what would happen to the stage as she was riding over the mountain passes.When she finally got to Timber Ridge and started teaching, she had a really hard time with the city council as everything she did was under a microscope. She had secrets from her past and was living a lie, as she let everyone believe that she was a widow. She meet the young handsome sheriff James McPherson and they both had a past that they were not telling. Molly had a time with the council and her students, but she found a way to teach that had the entire country coming to see. The new hotel was being built that was right at the surfer springs and they were using Italian immigrants to do the work, but they were not being paid much and she wanted one of the little boys to come to her school but he was not allowed the same as the black little son of Josiah Birch, he was introduced in the first book. She was teaching them on her own time but the council didn't like that either. She could speak three languages and was a big help in translating the Italian from the workers and she helped them. Will Molly ever do anything to please the council? Will she be able to teach the children or will she be replaced? What is this secret she is hiding?This book was sent free from Baker Publishing Group for me to post my own review. I give this book a 5.
  • (4/5)
    This is book 2 in the Timber Ridge Reflections series and I enjoyed it even more than I did book 1. It is a story of learning the hard way that the choices we make can and will effect more than just ourselves. A story of secrets, of prejudices, of love and of forgiveness. Dr. Molly Whitcomb, a professor at college, finds herself being dismissed from her school because of a bad choice and finding herself taking a position as a teacher in the Colorado Territory at Timber Ridge. She is with child and no husband, so she tries to hide her disgrace by putting a ring on her finger and saying her husband has died. Sheriff James McPherson has a feeling things are not quite as they seem when she first gets to town, but he can't figure out what Molly Whitcomb is hiding. He also can't stop his growing feelings for her. The problem is, when he finds out the truth, what will that do to the love that is building between both of them?Tamera Alexander does a great job of making the characters seem real and helping you understanding the thoughts and standards of that time for a woman like Dr. Molly Whitcomb. It is a story well worth reading. You can easily read this as a stand alone, but reading book one first will help you understand the characters that much more.
  • (5/5)
    Reading the back cover blurb for the book a reader knows that the main character Molly Whitcomb has a secret that is reputation-ruin worthy. After reading the first chapter a reader knows what that secret is. I am quite certain there will be some readers who will give up right there on this book, but oh how I wish you would not. This is not a story about making mistakes and moving on with life. This is a story about being a fallible human and living with it. There are times in life where your insides are screaming to just let this moment be gone, or just to be "beyond the moment". Yet, our heavenly Father knows what is best for us. This novel is a sequel, but is quite a stand alone. It is powerful and edgy and really pushes the limits of your conscience and what-if scenarios. I highly recommend this read as one to deepen your heart and convictions and see the inside of some people you might have just ignored in different circumstances. Think hard about casting those stones. Read this book and grow and learn from the experience.