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Wolves of the Calla: The Dark Tower V

Wolves of the Calla: The Dark Tower V

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von George Guidall


Wolves of the Calla: The Dark Tower V

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von George Guidall

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (384 Bewertungen)
Länge:
25 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Nov 4, 2003
ISBN:
9780743561693
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Roland Deschain and his ka-tet are bearing southeast through the forests of Mid-World, the almost timeless landscape that seems to stretch from the wreckage of civility that defined Roland's youth to the crimson chaos that seems the future's only promise. Followers of Stephen King's epic series know Roland well, or as well as this enigmatic hero can be known. They also know the companions who have been drawn to his quest for the Dark Tower: Eddie Dean and his wife, Susannah; Jake Chambers, the boy who has come twice through the doorway of death into Roland's world; and Oy, the Billy Bumbler.

In this long-awaited fifth novel in the saga, their path takes them to the outskirts of Calla Bryn Sturgis, a tranquil valley community of farmers and ranchers on Mid-World's borderlands. Beyond the town the rocky ground rises towards the hulking darkness of Thunderclap, the source of a terrible affliction that is slowly stealing the community's soul. One of the town's residents is Pere Callahan, a ruined priest who, like Susannah, Eddie and Jake, passed through one of the portals that lead both into and out of Roland's world.

As Father Callahan tells the ka-tet the astonishing story of what happened following his shamed departure from Maine in 1977, his connection to the Dark Tower becomes clear, as does the danger facing a single red rose in a vacant lot off Second Avenue in midtown Manhattan. For Calla Bryn Sturgis, danger gathers in the east like a storm cloud. The Wolves of Thunderclap and their unspeakable depredation are coming. To resist them is to risk all, but these are odds the gunslingers are used to, and they can give the Calla folken both courage and cunning. Their guns, however, will not be enough.

Freigegeben:
Nov 4, 2003
ISBN:
9780743561693
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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Was die anderen über Wolves of the Calla denken

4.6
384 Bewertungen / 75 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    YOOOOO!! READ THIS SERIES.
    You know, I like Roland, but goddamn is the man a bit slow. I know, I know. Ka. Kaka I say, because you can still learn the ways you're gonna be skinned.

    But about the book as a whole, The Wolves of the Calla has been a WONDERFUL read. I am reinvested, after the almost-to-slow drag of the 4th installment, and I am itching to read the 6th installment. And truly, the other characters who are in the novel--but no spoilers--are just...I love them. They may fit archetypes (this whole business with Ka makes me giggle sometimes, as if King is using it as an excuse to make characters behave this way or that, but on the whole it is very subtle), but there is real character growth and development as well. And this installment, of course, has more excitement than the previous installment, although it takes as long to build up. I am starting to get anxious, too, because the incidents are getting more complex as the group gets closer to the 'top level'.

    I am definitely looking forward to the next installment.
  • (3/5)
    It feels more like a mere bridge between entries in the series than a solid novel, but King uses the downtime to full effect, allowing an opportunity for the reader to become even more familiar with the inner workings of his epic, dark fantasy characters and their world(s).
  • (2/5)
    Long and drawn out. The weakest book in the series so far. There were quite a few good moments, and the story was moved forward a bit but there was a real lack of impetus. After the digression into back-story of the previous volume, I had hoped Wolves of the Calla might provide more progress toward the tower. Instead, we have a very long setup to the final confrontation with the wolves. Along the way, Roland's ka-tet undergoes some changes.
  • (4/5)
    Very slow but rewarding. Perhaps the best (so far) action scenes in the series.Perhaps the most straight-forward of the 8 books.Callahan's tales save the midsection from pure boredom.
  • (5/5)
    The book is amazing, intense and very intimate between the main characters. Thank you Stephen King for continuing to invest your life over and over into your great gift of story telling.
  • (4/5)
    Dragged on a bit in the middle of the book, but excellently written. Starting the sixth in the series tonight.
  • (5/5)
    very good book. its been a journey . i loved. it
  • (5/5)
    Easily my favorite of the series! I’m on my 2nd journey to the Tower and reading along with the audiobook adds so much more depth. Didn’t realize how much I missed the first time!
  • (5/5)
    A beautiful and heart pounding addition to the series. The audio was different due to a different reader but the feeling was still captured and after a few chapters it felt seamless. I recommend if you've listened to the other books to make sure to listen to the afterword by Mr. King.
  • (5/5)
    Great book. Can't wait to get to the next one.
  • (4/5)
    Five books in and I'm still hooked. At this point, I want to get to the Dark Tower as badly as Roland does. So at first I was a little frustrated with the direction of "Wolves of the Calla." It felt like a rabbit trail at first. But the deeper we go in, the more clues we get about the world Roland lives in. And by the end of the book, the spark of suspicion that I'd been having burst to full flames with one whopper of a clue.
  • (5/5)
    Great reading and amazing story. Cannot wait until the next one.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent work. I have enjoyed all five so far and forward to the last two.
  • (4/5)
    The series is back to the first book level of description with a focus on back story. It was an enjoyable story but felt more like filler or a tangent, hopefully it will all tie in.
  • (3/5)
    Loved the book but the recording kept skipping around! Very difficult
  • (3/5)
    Whelp, I think I'm done. If I do finish the series, it will be a long time from now.
  • (4/5)
    As I get deeper and deeper into the Dark Tower, I wonder what will happen--will they prevail? I know there are more books in the series, but that hardly means that the characters I have come to know will be there all standing and unscathed at the end.

    Great read!
  • (3/5)
    Too much backstory, not enough battle. Great episodes but ultimately frustrating and overdrawn.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! Definitely one of the best of the series. My only problem lies in the fact that I hate creepy pregnancies...there's one major female character, why does she have to have the whole mystical pregnancy trope going on? ugh. Other than that, fantastic book!
  • (5/5)
    Take the long flashback moments from Wizard and Glass, add the sense of urgency (and the time trips) of The Drawing of the Three and the malicious conspiracies from The Wastelands, mix it all together and you have Wolves of the Calla. Is that a bad thing? No way. Even if this book is not as exciting as The Wastelands (in my opinion, the best book of the series), it is great.

    No, there is no action from the beginning until the end. In this book, Roland and his an-tet are put in a complicated situation (and if you think about it, Roland Deschain de Gilead is NEVER in complicated situations, but never mind that): they need to help the people from Call against a cruel group of inhumane creatures that kidnap children for a brief period of time, allowing them to return home... completely useless (roonts, as they call).
    Of course, Roland and co. could always avoid all the trouble a and continue their quest to the misterious Dark Tower, but they opt to stay and help for two reasons: one, because it's the gunslingers' duty to help the ones who need their help and two, because the people of Calla are in the possession of an object of Roland's interest.

    What you'll find in this book: the flashback of a couple of citizens of Calla, a new personality for Susannah (personality? Hm, I wonder...) and several referrences to the world as we know, from Stephen King's own books (which reminds me: who read Salem's Lot will like this book - as for the ones who didn't read it, like me, will not get completely lost in the story) to Harry Potter.
    At the end of the story, as usual, we have a battle almost as epic as the one from Lud and an ending that makes you hungry for more.

    Also, it's always interesting to notice how much the characters, specially Eddie, are growing wise and mature and how strong is Roland's "human" side. Perhaps this is what makes the story so good.
  • (4/5)
    Wolves of the Calla was a significant uptick in the series; Wizard in Glass (#4) did not do me well, so what a relief to be sucked in.Even though the novel stays in one little town, the larger arc of the series is pushed forward. I am impressed by how King did this. The town story was riveting, and never did I feel like the "true quest" got forgotten. Jake is coming into his own, which is a fine thing, and I am enjoying how Roland is becoming more human. The power structure of the ka-tet shifts in this book. If I read King's horror stuff I would have probably loved the Salem's Lot link-in. Even having not read it I was pulled along just fine, and I liked the Callahan character a lot. Overall, a very fine read.
  • (5/5)
    Brilliant and atmospheric.
    Read it twice.
  • (5/5)
    Some years had passed since Wizard and Glass was published, and along the way the author, Stephen King, was seriously injured in a pedestrian car accident while out walking. And then at some point after that, he decides it's time to continue the saga of the Dark Tower. Not just continue it, but finish it. King would complete the last three volumes of the Dark Tower story starting with this one, Wolves of the Calla.
  • (3/5)
    My least favorite work (thus far) in one of my favorite series. While I enjoy and appreciate the direction towards which this series is evolving, as well as many other facets of this individual work, it's very clear (even couched in the author's afterword) that there was a re-visioning of this magnum opus between book IV (Wizard and Glass) and this volume. As a result, many places in this work felt like a transitional piece.
  • (4/5)
    Come-come-commala, I really liked "Wolves of the Calla"! Say thankee big-big Mr. King! The ka-tet defends a town, adds a new member, and hears a tale that is from another King novel! The Sisters of Oriza use a forespecial weapon, Black Thirteen is here, and Roland dances! It's a heck of a tale! And to be continued in Part 6 (or is it 19)? "Someone saved, someone saved, someone saved my life tonight." And for that, I say thankee!
  • (5/5)
    The fucking ending!!!!!! JEEBUS!!!! ARGHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!
  • (5/5)
    I love this series. It took me a long time to get to it. With all the other books I had to read, I wanted to have a completed series in hand. With that I read the entire series in a month and a half.

    This particular book took us into the mountains. With twists and turns, you encounter robots, more traveling through doors, and my favorite Oy!

    I can't tell you how bad I wanted to see how this ends. Does he find the tower? If he does, what happens? I know, but your just going to have to keep on reading!
  • (4/5)
    After two entire novels that are supposedly part of this giant, sprawling series but that did pretty much nothing to advance the plot, it is a great relief to be "back on the Beam" in the parlance of these Gunslingers and their world. I find this a little ironic, since an element that has annoyed me about this series is precisely the kind of thing the Beam represents: the author appearing to mistrust his characters so much that he has to keep sending them message dreams and cripple them with artificial obsessions and things they "just know", of which the Beam -- sort of like a ley line except even the clouds in the sky move according to its dictates, to make sure everyone keeps going the right way -- but it is so.*

    All of which basically means that Wolves of the Calla is probably my favorite of these damned things since The Drawing of the Three, although I found nothing in it that could replace the Lobstrosities in my heart.

    Our ka-tet has come across a town -- really one of many towns and settlements in a well-cultivated agricultural region, all of which share a unique problem -- that sort of, kind of, thinks that maybe it needs their help, but doesn't really want to commit to asking for that help because of the trouble it might stir up. It's a classic plot from Samurai stories to the medieval tales of chivalry to westerns, given an interesting twist here by its placement within the Dark Tower arc, and by the mystery of what exactly these "Wolves" are that plague the Calla by somehow changing the reproductive norms of these communities so that twins are rampant and singletons extremely rare, the better to carry off one of each pair sometime in childhood, do something unspeakable to him or her, and send him or her back a complete simpleton with a tendency towards giantism. The children are collected a little more frequently than once a generation; the people only get 30 days warning of their coming via an android (named, of course, Andy) who just suddenly knows one day that they're enroute. He's given the latest warning just in time for Roland, Eddie, Susannah, Jake and Oy to happen along.

    What really made this one stand out for me is the same kind of thing that almost redeemed Wizard and Glass: King's ability to create amazing podunk cultures (though, again, the folk speech of the Calla is wearying, full of "if it do ya fines" and "I begs" and excessive use of the do infinitive construction, e.g. "if you do want to eat" "he did dance that dance"**) complete with intricately fascinating agricultural/fertility rituals. This time around we encounter something called The Rice Song, which joyously celebrates the life cycle of the paddies in song, labor, movement and dance, the dance having at times an intriguing supernatural element as made stunningly plain when our man Roland, taking up what manifests as a heretofore unknown but deeply important traditional role, performs on stage, half Green Man, half "Boot Scootin' Boogie", all uncanny. It's an arresting scene.

    Accompanying this new version of King's version of the whole fertility/death cult thing is, well, the death side of it, which is in the hands of the women, at least until they shriek a prayer to the Rice Goddess and fling it with deadly accuracy. Do not mess with the ladies of the Calla, y'all. Do not.

    And speaking of women, there is an extremely well-handled sub-plot involving the unintended consequences of everybody doing what they had to back in The Waste Lands to bring Jake back into the Gunslinger world, and the Black Loc-nar that has been hidden in the Calla all this time by one Father Callahan of Salem's Lot fame, which sub-plot lends extra tension to a main plot that, for once, is not lacking in tension really at all, but I'm not complaining to have it there.

    What I might complain a bit of, if I thought it would do any good, is the nugatory pop culture references that got dumped in again. They're ladled out rather than dumped on this time, which is an improvement, but all they accomplished for me is to drag me out of the story to rub at my sore ribs, still tender from all the Oz-reference digging they got at the end of Wizard and Glass. And no, I'm not talking about all the Salem's Lot stuff. That's kind of cool. I was expecting Wolves of the Calla to be many things, possibly even many awesome things, and I was right so to expect, but I was not expecting it to also be a sequel to Salem's Lot. Which it kind of is and kind of isn't. The weird ways King found to inter-relate that story with this one made my jaw drop, and made the ghost of the 12-year-old Kate who first read SL jump up and down and point and yell happily. Bravo, there. Bravo.

    And of course there's a damned cliffhanger, which must have driven all of you original Dark Tower nerds crazy, but which I get to have resolved for me right away. Song of Susannah is already sitting in my Kindle awaiting my pleasure. But first, I need another break from this stuff. Maybe even some nice non-fiction.

    *And of course, it was their Mighty God-King who yanked them off the Beam, so, irony squared, as such.

    **These are not direct quotations, just examples I made up. I don't ever want to read this kind of dialogue again, not even to hunt up actual examples. Just ugh.
  • (4/5)
    One of my favorite movies is Seven Samurai, which this books takes its central theme from. It makes it fun and exciting, though barely moves the plot of the Dark Tower forward. It almost seems like a standalone story within the Dark Tower world. The story is good and well written, like all the other books. It has its slumps along the way, in my opinion has too many flashbacks, and can feel unnecessarily long. Overall it is still great. It gets weird at a lot of points, which I think helps redeem the book at points. The narrator is different then the previous books. It takes a little while to get used to him, but he does a good job overall. I think just Eddie's voice is where he lacked in.
  • (4/5)
    This is the fifth book in the Dark Tower series. You need to start at the beginning and read all the books. It is well worth doing so as this is a compelling and entertaining saga.The story continues and we meet new characters including Father Callahan from Salem's Lot. The gunslingers take a break from their quest to help a save the children of a small town but one of the ka-tet is in trouble.