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Danse Macabre

Danse Macabre

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von William Dufris


Danse Macabre

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von William Dufris

Bewertungen:
4/5 (62 Bewertungen)
Länge:
18 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Feb 23, 2010
ISBN:
9781441831095
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

The author whose boundless imagination and storytelling powers have redefined the horror genre, from 1974's Carrie to his epic Under the Dome, reflects on the very nature of terror-what scares us and why-in films (both cheesy and choice), television and radio, and, of course, the horror novel, past and present.

Informal, engaging, tremendous fun, and tremendously informative, Danse Macabre is an essential tour with the master of horror as your guide; much like his spellbinding works of fiction, you won't be able to put it down.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Feb 23, 2010
ISBN:
9781441831095
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Danse Macabre denken

4.2
62 Bewertungen / 35 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    I was hesitant on reading this, worried it would be out of date. (It's as old as me!) There have been a lot of... advances? (I don't know what you'd call them) in horror that no one could have predicted in 1981: slasher franchises going mainstream (e.g. Freddy Krueger action figures), J-horror, psychological horror (like Black Swan), torture porn, home invasion films, indie horror (e.g. The Blair Witch Project), the second rise and decline of zombies. Enough time has passed that now we have meta-horror for all those tropes (e.g. "Scream" and "The Cabin in the Woods").Nonetheless, much of it still holds up because it's really all about roots. And those roots take place in three things--films, TV, and books. It takes examples from timeless phenomenon like B-movie monsters, anthology suspense, and Lovecraft books. Each reflects the time period they were born into. And it's all delivered with Stephen King's tight and witty prose (he was still high in these days so the writing is good). It's the kind of book that might be assigned in an "Introduction to Horror" college class. Plus, it contains some of the missing biographical elements from "On Writing".However, I don't think it's required for any horror aficionado. There's a lot of examples from the 50s-70s that maybe influenced King more that it influenced everybody. Read this if you're a fan of Stephen King's style. You get to see him put on his college professor hat. But there are more current books that do just as well.
  • (3/5)
    Although I love Stephen King and wanted to hear his insights into the horror found in our pop culture, I was disappointed. The references ramble a bit, in his fiction it seems to have a conversational feel, here it feels like listening to a drunk uncle reminiscing about the good ole days. I did prefer the references to books versus movies and did pick up the invasion of the body snatchers by Jack Finney which I loved.I do have to say I listened to the audiobook version and learned the narrator is also the voice of Bob The Builder. This was such a turn off, his reading is annoying and laughable at points, maybe I would have liked and followed the narration better if it had been read by Stephen himself, avoid the audiobook!
  • (3/5)
    A very interesting look at the horror genre. The recommendations at the end are excellent. I went on to read a number of them and they were all good reads.
  • (5/5)
    Really interesting insight into the perspective of an author whose work I really enjoy. However would have really liked to have had Steve do the narration himself
  • (5/5)
    Stephen King's Danse Macabre by Stephen King (1997)
  • (5/5)
    This is what my copy looks like after finishing:


    There was so much inside that head that I just wanted to remember, or come back to, or... just highlight. I could have done all of that on my nook, and it would have been easier. Simpler, less restricted as to what I could fit onto the post-it, but... I dunno. This way just felt right to me.

    There were a lot of references to books that I hadn't read yet, and these sections I tried to skim so that I could get the idea without the spoilers, but that wasn't always possible. I do hate spoilers, but I can't hold it against King too much, I knew that was a possibility when I picked this up. One doesn't read an examination of the horror genre without expecting examples... and I'm just NOT that well read to think that I would've read every book he might have mentioned. Not by a loooooooong shot.

    But the books that I have read, I now have a new and deeper appreciation for. King sees things in such a different way than I do, and so getting his perspective is fascinating.

    Highly recommend reading this.

    PS. Support your local used book stores! :D
  • (4/5)
    This is an overview of horror movies, t.v. series, and books from roughly 1950 to 1980. King’s knowledge of the subject is both wide and deep, naturally. Since King is two years older than I, much of the book was s great nostalgia trip for me. He’s very engaging here; reading this is like having a conversation with close but garrulous old friend.Oddly, the largest part of the book is devoted to movies. There are some redundancies, some over-writing, some bs. But at its heart this is a fun book that doesn’t take its subject too seriously, but doesn’t treat it as trash, either. Recommended if you’re a fan of the horror genre in any form, a fan if King, or interested in the era.
  • (3/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    “The danse macabre is a waltz with death.”"Danse Macabre" is a book that has been on my shelf for a looooong time. I'm not sure why I decided now was the time to read it, but I did. Also, it's interesting that the AMC channel is showing a series right now titled "Eli Roth’s History of Horror" that has King in it, and seems like the television version of this book, updated for 2018.On these pages, King covers the horror genre for literature, film, and radio during the time period of 1950-1980. Most of this read feels like a essay, or textbook, and has a bit of a dry feel to it. I even found myself skimming some of the material. But I learned a bit, and added about ten new books to my reading list!“The Last Waltz” is the gem in here. King's defense of the horror genre is peppered with real life examples of things that really happened, showing that reality is often worse than what appears in books, film, music, etc. People often ask me, "How can you read that stuff?" Well, Uncle Stevie has the answer that I'll be using from now on!I also really enjoyed King's musings on how the ideas(s) for "The Stand" began! (Patty Hearst!!??!! - no friggin' way!!!)So, it's non-fiction, sort of textbook-ish, and dry at times. But I'm glad I read it! And I'm glad he wrote it, especially this, at the end - “Thank you again for coming with me, and rest you well. But, being who I am and what I am, I cannot find it in my heart to wish you pleasant dreams...”

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (3/5)
    This was originally published in 1981. It is an analysis/criticism of horror books, movies and tv from 1950 to 1980. Although King said more than once in the book that he doesn't like analyzing this stuff, that's what the book felt like to me. More like the analysis and criticism one is supposed to do in English classes, and I was never interested in doing that. I read for interest, fun, enjoyment (or sometimes to scare myself in the horror I read!). But, not to analyze. Because of that, I lost interest many times while reading the book. There were parts that I did find myself following; moreso for books, movies and/or tv I've already read or seen. Overall, I'm rating it “ok”, but I think it really wasn't my cup of tea.
  • (4/5)
    I purchased this book back in the 1980’s when it was first published and I know I thumbed through it occasion but never really read it. In my defense, it was my “baby years” and I did not read much that was not escapism fiction. Okay, okay, I still don’t, but I sneak in some “high-brow” books every once in while now. I came across this title again as an audio download from my library and decided it was time to hear what the horror-master has to say about the horror genre.

    The audio book had an updated forward by Mr. King. His thoughts were interesting since it was around 30 years since the book was first published. The book was definitely worth the listen. Despite the fact that some of the references were dated (referring to his son Joe as a child when he is now a published author himself was amusing) but overall his references to horror books and films were still timely. He discusses the classics in the genre; Stoker, Matheson, Jackson as well as the cult-ish books and films.

    Definitely a worthwhile read for any die hard King fans or horror fans in general.
  • (4/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    An intriguing look into Stephen King's insights and interpretations of what horror is about and why horror fiction exists.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    Who knew Stephen King and terror could be so... entertaining?! A discussion of all things scary, including a look at films from the 1930s onwards, King brings a discerning and remarkably funny eye to dissecting what makes us scream. The book reads like an extended literary thesis on steroids: analytical but fun. A bit dated now (published in the 1980s) this reader would love a new edition to include films like Paranormal and The Conjuring.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (4/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    I'm re-reading Stephen King's books in chronological order and this was the next book in line. I can now tell exactly how old I was when I originally read his books because this was the first one I bought (well was gifted) brand new from the bookstore. Every July (my bday) and Christmas my dad would give me any new Stephen King books that had come out as presents; so I was 13 when I got this one. I was really looking forward to this, King's first foray into non-fiction, as my first read of it had been soooo enlightening. I wanted to get my hands on every book he mentioned, watch every movie he named but it being pre-internet days that was a very hard task indeed. Now that I re-read the book thirty years later I find that I've watched a great many of the mentioned movies and the major books listed but not all of them so I still had some titles and authors to add to my tbr. It's a great book and so interesting to read. Parts of the book are biographical telling about young Steve's life as a kid when he connected with this world of the macabre, but mostly it is his treatise on the horror story genre and what it includes both the good and the bad. The movie section was enjoyable but my favourite part was the longest section: on books, of course. Steve has a great writing voice and it's like taking to someone about a topic you both love over a couple of beers. The only part that was disappointing was the section on TV. The book shows its age here, written in 1981, King is writing from an era of Mork & Mindy, The Dukes of Hazzard and Fantasy Island to name a few. King has no use for television whatsoever, feeling that all who lower themselves to its level, actors, directors, writers are entering an abyss of no return. He does manage to tell about a few gems, in his opinion, and he recommends such as Outer Limits and Dark Shadows. The book was written over quite a period of time which shows as when he first starts the book he mentions his own books: . Carrie, 'Salem's Lot, The Shining (and the corresponding movies), further on Night Shift and The Stand and towards book's end The Dead Zone is mentioned once. He had also of course published Firestarter by the time this book was on the shelves. Since his opinions and views of television are so outdated from now, where horror is a staple on the tube with King even being behind some ventures himself (Kingdom Hospital), I would sincerely love a follow-up to this book. Two ideas I have Uncle Steve, if you are listening: 1) continue with another book following the same theme horror movies, TV, books from the 80s to the 2010's. or 2) A new book just on horror and TV where King can expound on the very short chapter he included in this book and then go on to talk about what happened with horror on TV after the sitcom driven slump of the 80s up to the present. Why was Buffy a big hit in the 90s? Why is Walking Dead so hot today? Great book for the history of the genre but really worthy of a modern follow-up since there is so much more to say when his opinions are rooted in the eighties.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (2/5)
    I can't say I disliked this book, though like many of Stephen King's recent works, it could definitely have used some editing. I found it overlong. Many of the points King made could have been dealt with much more succinctly; as it was, I found it repetitive at times.
  • (3/5)
    A survey of horror literature and movies. Pretty good insight into King's mindset, but not particularly revealing.
  • (4/5)
    This is one of the most effective studies on horror by one of the masters. Although King only covers thirty years of modern horror in the media (1950-1980), he still manages to cover a wide arc of large, Cold War-era horror medium to the quieter self-involved horror that peaked in the Seventies and Eighties. This is a fantastic read and a must for any horror fan.
  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    I scare easily. There's no question of this. I've never been a huge fan of scary movies. When I was not yet thirteen, a girl in my class had a sleepover birthday party. I don't recall if she was first generation American, or if she had actually been born prior to her family coming over from China, but her parents were...I'd like to say open-minded, but I think really they may have just been a little oblivious. They allowed her to rent Scream for the sleepover.A bunch of twelve-year-olds (plus the birthday girl's younger sisters--10 and 7, I think) watching Scream late at night. It may have scarred me for life. Prior to that, I think the scariest thing I'd ever seen was the ghost of Mary Meredith in The Uninvited (1944). Unless you want to count Tony Pierce's haunting craziness in The Bodyguard. God, I love that movie. Okay, and some of the classic "Twilight Zone" episodes are really freaky.In recent years, I've tried to be a little braver. A little. My best friend and I went to see the remake of The Amityville Horror in 2005. I'm sure Ryan Reynolds was really hot in it, but I wouldn't know because Ali and I spent the entire time watching the top two feet of the movie screen, my sweater blocking out the rest, out of fear. I've seen the second and third installments in the Scream series...through my fingers. I went back and watched every episode of Snick's "Are You Afraid of the Dark"...while at work, in the daytime, and only if I fast-forwarded through the opening because swings moving by themselves freak me the hell out.I've seen both Perfect Getaway (2009) and The Orphan (2009), both of which are really thrillers....and both during the day...at work. Actually, the biggest jump in my horror/thriller education (until very recently) was watching each and every episode of CBS's "Harper's Island" back in 2009...in the comfort of my home, after dark, and not screaming every time something remotely scary happened.In the last year, I've started watching some good old classic horror films (see: The Creature from the Black Lagoon or The House on Haunted Hill). And then I got turned on to "The Walking Dead" on AMC. This led to more of the....less classic horror films (see: Dead & Buried or Return of the Killer Tomatoes). I don't count the Jaws series (or any of those shark attack/megalodon films) in my education, partly because that (to me) has always been a different type of scary, and also because most of them are just awful and inadvertently hilarious. And finally, this led to seeing The Woman in Black last month. I was really good up until a bit with a rocking chair, at which point I started letting the sleeve of my sweater hover in front of my eyes now and then.I didn't plan to do an actual review of this book, and this is not really a review. The copy I had belongs to a friend of mine (with whom I saw The Woman in Black) who lent it to me while he was on vacation, and I read it (mostly) to gain an understanding of a genre that I didn't really understand very well at all. Danse Macabre is a work of non-fiction, by Stephen King, about the genre he knows best: horror. It was first published in 1981 and, as a result, only concerns stories (novels, short stories, radio plays, and films) up to that point. The bulk of the focus is on the works written during King's lifetime (he was thirty-three in 1981).But the brilliant thing about King's insight into this subject is that the genre really doesn't change. He bases his analysis on the idea that horror can be boiled down to three archetypes: the vampire (see: Dracula), the werewolf (see: Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde) and "The Thing Without a Name" (see: Frankenstein). And over thirty years later, the method of the madness has not changed. I often found myself classifying and re-classifying more modern pictures and novels as the book went on. But this was not just a lesson in classification. Rather, it was a dual lesson in anthropology and literature, one that--when applied to my affinity for fantasy novels--was truly illuminating.I just want to say three very brief things about this book, and then I'll let you all be:1. I can't imagine being not only settled with a family and published, but so incredibly intelligent at thirty-three years old. The man amazes me.2. King's voice in the book is exceedingly casual and, therefore, the reading of it is very comfortable. There's no high-handed alienating jargon. It's quite down to earth.3. I can now go forward in my reading with a better understanding of why fantasy and horror exist, and to what extent they are useful in allowing modern readers of fiction to live and imagine and create. The world may be very different than it was in 1981, but some things - like fear - never really change.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (3/5)
    Danse Macabre is Stephen King's essay/opinion piece on the horror genre from 1950-1980. The writing style is very conversational, but if you are not well versed in the books and movies from the selected time period much of the content will float right on over the readers head. The problem with a book like this is that it is stuck in time, and the level of enjoyment for the reader is directly proportional to the readers age and the readers exposure to writing from this time period. Fortunately, Stephen King provides an appendix of recommended reads to help the reader expand their horror horizons. For me, I am hoping to beef up my wishlist, read some horror novels that I was previously unaware of and maybe come back to this book when I can fully appreciate King's expert opinion.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed the conversational tone, and I found it to be a really fun read. It's a light-n-fluffy sort of popcorn book. I found that the most appealing part was actually the recommendations of horror movies and literature. King has pointed the way to some really great stuff that I never would have found otherwise.
  • (4/5)
    A horror/pop-culture perrenial, but how fantastic would it be to have King write an update, or a whole new book on the subject! I'd love to know his take on how much things have changed since 1983 - all I know is that he didn't thing much of 'Twilight'. Hardly revolutionary. :)
  • (2/5)
    I can't say I disliked this book, though like many of Stephen King's recent works, it could definitely have used some editing. I found it overlong. Many of the points King made could have been dealt with much more succinctly; as it was, I found it repetitive at times.
  • (5/5)
    There's something about the way Stephen King writes that just seems like he's sitting across the table from you, chit-chatting. It's conversational while educational and it makes me wish that I was alive and in college those twenty years ago so I could have benefited first hand from the lectures. This is King's view on the horror genre in film, television and writing from the 1950s until the 1980s. While not the most up-to-date information, what he says holds true even today. Each film/novel/show he analyzes can bring a sense of nostalgia to the reader or give them a whole buffet of horror classics to go check out. (Yes, I went to my library and rented a good chunk of movies. Next week are the books...)He says, and holds true to that promise, that he won't analyze things like an English professor and I enjoy that the most. He shares in something I've said for years: sometimes, a story is just a story and there's no subtext when we write it. And that horror and humor are linked, as they should be. It makes me feel not so bad knowing that I'm not the only person who laughs ridiculously loud at horror movies...I'd recommend this book as a fresh view of what's happened in the horror genre, and to see where the roots lie. The roots before everything became the gross-out factor.
  • (4/5)
    This was an interesting read. I liked learning what King thought about the horror stories than influenced him.
  • (4/5)
    Great read. I have so much to read now and so many movies to see. I completely understands King when he talks about how a person can appreciate stories even when they're presented in a less than talented way, they still have that magic even if the author/director doesn't know how to fully express it. I never gave much thought to the archetypes of horror, but after reading this book I can see them clearly in the books/movies I've read/seen in the past. Loved this book.
  • (5/5)
    I've read the book and this time, I listened to the audio version. I definitely recommend the audio, although the narrator's voice was a bit grating to me at first. Quickly though, I adapted to his sound and lost myself in the memories of a lifetime. Many spoilers throughout and a lot might be meaningless if you are not familiar with the books and movies covered. I recommend looking at the bibliography and watching and reading as much of the material Stephen discusses before you read this book. This is one of my most favorite SK writings because I enjoy his non-fiction almost more than his fiction. Definitely one of these books that might be appreciated more by readers closer to Stephen's age, I think younger people could enjoy it too as a movie and book guide for a real history lesson of horror. The roots and templates for today's scares, these B flicks and their campy promotions were the best. You can see for yourself where the movies and books of today drew heavily on the ideas and creativity of yesteryear. And, although there aren't the special effects and buckets o'blood like in today's movies and books, in some cases, they are scarier and more disturbing in what they don't show. I have seen or read almost every single thing Stephen discusses here, so this was a nostalgic look back at my childhood and young adulthood. I would recommend this book to anyone who appreciates the horror genre and its place in pop culture. I love a good scary story because, I do believe in spooks, I do believe in spooks, I do believe in spooks.
  • (4/5)
    This book length essay on the horror genre turned out to be much more entertaining than I expected. Even when writing a nonfiction genre-study, King cannot avoid being King. His goofy sense of humor, absolute frankness, and the occasional crass comment made me feel more like I was having a beer with the guy and discussing books than sitting in a lecture hall. King fans who want to hear where he gets his inspirations from and what authors/films he has taken enjoyment from will get a lot out of this book.A word of caution however, if you hate spoilers, you WILL hate this book. King goes in depth in discussing several movies and books that he feels have had major influence upon the genre and he doesn't hold back from describing major plot points or endings. If you think that you might have the urge to read older sci-fi, fantasy, or horror and don't want to have any spoilers, this is not the book for you.
  • (5/5)
    This is a fascinating and humorous book, worth reading and enjoyable for fans of horror in any form, film or television or fiction. I'd also go so far as to say that readers and watchers of sci-fi or readers who simply like to talk about books and writing would enjoy this. King spends equal amounts of attention on writing, film, and fiction, and his insights well worth looking into. If you're interested, I'd strongly recommend this book. King's voice makes it an enjoyable read, and it reads more like fiction than anything else. The one warning? Your list of to-be-watched movies and to-be-read books is sure to grow....
  • (4/5)
    I found the author and subject quite interesting. But I am a little younger than King himself and did not grow up with the sci fi and horror that he did. I would, however, be EXTREMELY interested in King's take on horror novels, movie, and television from 1980 onwards. I feel that horror became much more acceptable as a form of entertainment in this generation. I do enjoy Stephen King's work though. He is the only author that I ALWAYS read the introduction or preface to his work, because he is just as interesting in nonfiction as fiction.
  • (4/5)
    Stephen King must have gotten tired of answering the question ‘Why do you write such horrible stuff (and why do we read it)?’Danse Macabre is sort of a wildly expanded version of the introduction he wrote for his first short story collection: Night Shift. Here, he discusses his love for the horror genre and explains what he finds valuable about it. This leads him to a survey of horror in the source of novels, films, radio and comics from the 1950's through the '80's.Reading through the book, it is pretty dated. If you're an oldster like me who can remember the seventies and eighties the book ought to give you a heady dose of nostalgia and maybe remind you of some books and movies that should be checked out again, or some books you wanted to read back then, but have forgotten about. However, if you are younger and can't remember stuff like Dark Shadows then the book's examples could come off as too unfamiliar for enjoyment. He is mainly focused on the years 1950-80 (with detailed side trips to praise the three horror bedrocks Dracula, Frankenstein and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde) so depending on your age/interest in what the state of horror was at that time, your mileage may vary.I enjoy the way the book was written, because even in his non-fiction he still has the gift for the gab and I enjoy his writing persona. Other LT reviewers that I respect didn't enjoy that so much, so maybe it depends on how much you like King's style.You'll also get more horror book and movie recommendations than you can shake a stick at. He gives some interesting analysis of The House Next Door, The Haunting of Hill House, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Ghost Story, Something Wicked This Way Comes, The Doll Who Ate His Mother and The Incredible Shrinking Man.This book also deserves credit for sparking my interest in Richard Matheson. King is fairly generous in recommending other horror writers and gives clear explanations of why he thinks the good ones are good.I do wish he would do a companion book. Hey, in 2010 he could cover the 80's, '90's and '00's. That would give him another thirty year block. That would be cool.
  • (3/5)
    This look at the horror genre through the mid-20th century is a bit dated now, but it still gives a good background on the history of the genre from an approachable source. But then, King could write about trimming his beard and it would be a good read...